4 février 2019 | Local, Naval

Major contract awarded for work on the Joint Support Ships

Mississauga-based INDAL Technologies Inc. has been awarded a contract to provide the helicopter handling system for the Joint Support Ships

North Vancouver, BC – Seaspan Shipyards (Seaspan) has awarded INDAL Technologies Inc. (INDAL) of Mississauga, Ontario, a contract valued at almost $20M for work on Canada's new Joint Support Ships (JSS). INDAL represents one of more than 60 Ontario suppliers to date that Seaspan is working with to meet its commitments under the National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS).

INDAL is providing its Aircraft Ship Integrated Securing & Traversing (ASIST) System for JSS. The ASIST System is a state-of-the-art integrated helicopter handling system for surface combatants. The System provides the functionality necessary to support helicopter handling, including deck securing on touchdown, on-deck manoeuvring and traversing to/from the hangar space, and helicopter launch. INDAL will also be supplying all the installation support and training, as well as the required maintenance and logistics documentation.

A distinct capability of this System is its ability to straighten and align the helicopter remotely from the ASIST Control Console using combined operations of the on-deck Rapid Securing Device (RSD) and Traverse Winch sub-system. Straightening and alignment is achieved with no requirement for external cables attached to the helicopter. Various configurations of INDAL's ASIST systems are operating successfully with navies from around the world including Chile, Turkey and Singapore. ASIST has also been selected by the U.S. Navy as an integral capability within its DDG-1000 “Zumwalt” destroyer program and by the Royal Australian Navy for its Air Warfare Destroyer and SEA 5000 Programs.

Thanks to its work under the NSS, Seaspan has issued over $690M in committed contracts with approximately 540 Canadian companies. By building ships for the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) and Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) in Canada, Seaspan is helping to re-establish a Canadian marine industry. As the company continues to make progress on its NSS commitments, this supply chain is expected to grow as more Canadian companies realize new opportunities with a revitalized shipbuilding industry. It is through its work on the NSS that Seaspan is directly and indirectly helping to employ thousands of Canadians from coast to coast to coast.

QUOTES

“This contract is a prime example of how the National Shipbuilding Strategy is helping drive technological innovation in Canada, while also building a strong, sustainable marine sector. INDAL Technologies Inc.'s homegrown, state-of-the-art technology will help equip our Royal Canadian Navy's future supply ships with the tools needed so that our women and men in uniform can carry out their important work.”

– The Honourable Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Public Services and Procurement and Accessibility

“Seaspan Shipyards is pleased to announce this major contract award for INDAL Technologies Inc. to provide a crucial system for the Joint Support Ships. Through its work in Canada, and internationally, INDAL is a trusted leader in the design and development of ship borne helicopter handling and other sophisticated marine systems. As a result of contract awards like these the NSS is encouraging investment by Canadian companies, supporting the development of export opportunities, and creating highly-skilled, middle class jobs across Canada”

– Mark Lamarre, Chief Executive Officer, Seaspan Shipyards

“On behalf of INDAL Technologies Inc. I am excited to announce that we have been awarded a contract valued at almost $20 million to provide the helicopter handling system for the Royal Canadian Navy's (RCN) new Joint Support Ships currently being built at Seaspan's Vancouver Shipyards. INDAL Technologies prides itself in combining a high level of engineering and manufacturing capability with expertise in the management of large and complex defense programs to produce unmatched solutions for the RCN. We value our ongoing relationship with Seaspan and our partnership under the National Shipbuilding Strategy.”

– Colleen Williams, General Manager, INDAL Technologies Inc.

QUICK FACTS

  • Seaspan operates three yards with a combined workforce greater than 2,500 people across its yards in North Vancouver & Victoria.
  • To date, Seaspan has awarded over $690M in contracts to approximately 540 Canadian companies, with nearly $230M in contracts awarded to Ontario-based companies.
  • INDAL is based in Mississauga, Ontario, since its incorporation in 1951 under the name Dominion Aluminum Fabricating Ltd., the company has developed its engineering design and manufacturing capabilities and today is heavily involved in systems integration and testing.
  • The company has over forty years of experience with equipment for shipboard aircraft operation, its personnel are uniquely trained and experienced in designing and building system solutions for handling aircraft and UAVs onboard ships in the toughest possible environments.
  • INDAL is positively impacted with 38 person-years of direct employment as a direct result of its work under the NSS.

https://www.seaspan.com/major-contract-awarded-work-joint-support-ships

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