7 février 2024 | International, C4ISR

Hand-held navigation tool for US Army deemed effective against jamming

The U.S. Army last year tapped TRX Systems to produce DAPS GEN II in a deal worth as much as $402 million.

https://www.defensenews.com/electronic-warfare/2024/02/07/hand-held-navigation-tool-for-us-army-deemed-effective-against-jamming/

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