29 avril 2021 | Local, Sécurité

Funding to develop inclusive respirator for RCMP / Financement pour le développement d'un appareil de protection respiratoire inclusive pour la GRC

Funding to develop inclusive respirator for RCMP / Financement pour le développement d'un appareil de protection respiratoire inclusive pour la GRC

New Funding Opportunity

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) is seeking the design and production of an inclusive respiratory protection option that can be safely used by front-line police officers who have facial hair for religious, cultural, medical and/or gender identity reasons.

Think you can solve the Inclusive Respirator challenge? Compete for funding to prove your feasibility and develop a solution! This challenge closes on June 9th, 2021.

Apply online

 

 

Nouvelle opportunité de financement

La Gendarmerie royale du Canada (GRC) cherche à concevoir et à produire une option de protection respiratoire inclusive pouvant être utilisée en toute sécurité par les policiers de première ligne qui ont une pilosité faciale pour des raisons religieuses, culturelles, médicales et/ou d’identité de genre.

Vous pensez pouvoir relever le défi du Respirateur Inclusif ? Compétitionnez afin de prouver la faisabilité de votre solution et de la développer ! Ce défi se termine le 9 juin, 2021.

 

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