7 février 2019 | International, Sécurité, Autre défense

DARPA: Intelligent Healing for Complex Wounds

Blast injuries, burns, and other wounds experienced by warfighters often catastrophically damage their bones, skin, and nerves, resulting in months to years of recovery for the most severe injuries and often returning imperfect results. This long and limited healing process means prolonged pain and hardship for the patient, and a drop in readiness for the military. However, DARPA believes that recent advances in biosensors, actuators, and artificial intelligence could be extended and integrated to dramatically improve tissue regeneration. To achieve this, the new Bioelectronics for Tissue Regeneration (BETR) program asks researchers to develop bioelectronics that closely track the progress of the wound and then stimulate healing processes in real time to optimize tissue repair and regeneration.

Paul Sheehan, the BETR program manager, described his vision for the technology as “not just personalized medicine, but dynamic, adaptive, and precise human therapies” that adjust to the wound state moment by moment to provide greater resilience to wounded warfighters.

“Wounds are living environments and the conditions change quickly as cells and tissues communicate and attempt to repair,” Sheehan said. “An ideal treatment would sense, process, and respond to these changes in the wound state and intervene to correct and speed recovery. For example, we anticipate interventions that modulate immune response, recruit necessary cell types to the wound, or direct how stem cells differentiate to expedite healing.”

The envisioned BETR technology would represent a sharp break from traditional wound treatments, and even from other emerging technologies to facilitate recovery, most of which are passive in nature.

Under current medical practice, physicians provide the conditions and time for the body to either heal itself when tissues have regenerative capacity or to accept and heal around direct transplants. Most people are familiar with interventions that include casts to stabilize broken bones or transplants of healthy ligaments or organs from donors to replace tissues that do not regenerate.

Passive approaches often result in slow healing, incomplete healing with scarring, or, in some unfortunate cases, no healing at all. Blast injuries in particular seem to scramble the healing processes; 23 percent of them will not fully close. Moreover, research shows that in nearly two thirds of military trauma cases — a rate far higher than with civilian trauma injuries — these patients suffer abnormal bone growth in their soft tissue due to a condition known as heterotopic ossification, a painful experience that can greatly limit future mobility.

Although recent experimental treatments offer some hope for expedited recovery, many of these new approaches remain static in nature. For instance, some “smart” bandages emit a continuous weak electric field or locally deliver drugs. Alternatively, hydrogel scaffolds laced with a drug can recruit stem cells, while decellularized tissue re-seeded with donor cells from the patient help avoid rejection by the host's immune system. These newer approaches may indeed encourage growth of otherwise non-regenerative tissue, but because they do not adapt to the changing state of a wound, their impact is limited.

“To understand the importance of adaptive treatments that respond to the wound state, consider the case of antibiotic ointments,” Sheehan explained. “People use antibiotics to treat simple cuts, and they help if the wound is infected. However, completely wiping out the natural microbiota can impair healing. Thus, without feedback, antibiotics can become counterproductive.”

Recent technologies have begun to close the loop between sensing and intervention, looking for signs of infection such as changes in pH level or temperature to trigger treatment. To date, however, these systems have been limited to monitoring changes induced by bacteria. For BETR, DARPA intends to use any available signal, be it optical, biochemical, bioelectronic, or mechanical, to directly monitor the body's physiological processes and then to stimulate them to bring them under control, thereby speeding healing or avoiding scarring or other forms of abnormal healing.

By the conclusion of the four-year BETR program, DARPA expects researchers to demonstrate a closed-loop, adaptive system that includes sensors to assess wound state and track the body's complex responses to interventions; biological actuators that transmit appropriate biochemical and biophysical signals precisely over space and time to influence healing; and adaptive learning approaches to process data, build models, and determine interventions. To succeed, the BETR system must yield faster healing of recalcitrant wounds, superior scar-free healing, and/or the ability to redirect abnormally healing wounds toward a more salutary pathway.

DARPA anticipates that successful teams will include expertise in bioelectronics, artificial intelligence, biosensors, tissue engineering, and cellular regeneration. Further, DARPA encourages proposals that address healing following osseointegration surgery, which is often necessary to support the use of advanced prosthetics by wounded warfighters.

DARPA will host a Proposers Day on March 1, 2019 in Arlington, Virginia, to provide more information to researchers interested in submitting a proposal for funding. Additional information is available at https://go.usa.gov/xENCQ. A forthcoming Broad Agency Announcement, to be posted to the Federal Business Opportunities website, will include full details of the program.

https://www.darpa.mil/news-events/2019-02-06a

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  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - December 17, 2018

    18 décembre 2018 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - December 17, 2018

    AIR FORCE Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Rolling Meadows, Illinois, has been awarded a $3,600,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for Large Aircraft Infrared Counter Measures (LAIRCM) equipment and support. This contract provides for LAIRCM line replaceable units, support equipment, logistics support related activities, systems and sustaining engineering, program management, and other efforts necessary supporting efforts specified in each task/delivery order. Work will be performed in Rolling Meadows, Illinois, and is expected to be completed by December 2025. No funds are being obligated at the time of award. This contract involves numerous foreign military sales requirements and is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8638-19-D-0001). L-3 Technologies, Greenville, Texas, has been awarded an $8,600,988 firm-fixed-price contract modification to previously awarded contract FA8620-16-G-3027/FA8620-18-F-4816 for management support services. The contract modification provides for the exercise of an option for additional services being produced under the basic contract. Work will be performed in Greenville, Texas, and is expected to be completed by Dec. 31, 2019. This contract involves 100 percent Foreign Military Sales and is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $8,600,988 are being obligated at the time of award. The 645th Aeronautical Systems Group, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity. CORRECTION: The contract announced on Dec. 14, 2018, to Peraton Inc., Herndon, Virginia (FA8750-19-F-0003) for Xdomain technology through research, evolution, enhancement, maintenance, and support software and report, was actually awarded today, Dec. 17, 2018. All other information in the announcement is correct. ARMY BAE Systems Land & Armaments LP, Sterling Heights, Michigan, was awarded a $375,932,453 hybrid (firm-fixed-price and fixed-price-incentive) contract for Mobile Protected Firepower middle tier acquisition and rapid prototyping effort with low-rate initial production options. Bids were solicited via the internet with three received. Work will be performed in Sterling Heights, Michigan, with an estimated completion date of Oct. 15, 2025. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $175,974,048 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W56HZV-19-C-0035). General Dynamics Land Systems Inc., Sterling Heights, Michigan, was awarded a $335,043,086 hybrid (firm-fixed-price and fixed-price-incentive) contract for Mobile Protected Firepower middle tier acquisition and rapid prototyping effort with low-rate initial production options. Bids were solicited via the internet with three received. Work will be performed in Sterling Heights, Michigan, with an estimated completion date of Oct. 15, 2025. Fiscal 2018 and 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $175,011,179 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W56HZV-19-C-0036). Lockheed Martin Corp., Orlando, Florida, was awarded a $91,250,000 modification (P00069) to contract W31P4Q-15-C-0102 for procurement of Joint-Air-to-Ground missiles under the initial phases of the Low-rate Initial Production 3. Work will be performed in Orlando, Florida, with an estimated completion date of Feb. 28, 2022. Fiscal 2017, and 2018 other procurement Army funds in the amount of $91,250,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity. Foster-Miller Inc., doing business as QinetiQ North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, was awarded a $90,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for the reset, sustainment, maintenance and recap to support the overall sustainment actions of the Tactical Adaptable Light Ordnance Neutralization family of robotic systems. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 16, 2023. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W56HZV-19-D-0024). Gilbane Building Co., Providence, Rhode Island, was awarded a $12,651,574 firm-fixed-price contract for modifications to an operational training facility, Marine Corps Air Station, Iwakuni, Japan. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work will be performed in Iwakuni City, Japan, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 3, 2019. Fiscal 2016 and 2017 military construction funds in the amount of $12,651,574 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Camp Zama, Japan, is the contracting activity (W912HV-19-C-0002). NAVY Lockheed Martin Corp., Owego, New York, is awarded a $92,500,000 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for technical, management, and process support to maintain, upgrade, and deploy software and systems configurations for all H-60 variants in support of the Navy and the governments of Denmark, Australia, and Saudi Arabia. Work will be performed in Owego, New York, and is expected to be completed in September 2023. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $9,392,660 will be obligated at time of award, all of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This contract combines purchases for the Navy ($70,010,000; 75.68 percent); and the governments of Australia ($15,430,000; 16.68 percent); Denmark ($3,530,000; 3.82 percent); and Saudi Arabia ($3,530,000; 3.82 percent), under the Foreign Military Sales program. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity (N00019-19-D-0005). Huntington Ingalls Inc., Pascagoula, Mississippi, is awarded a $39,395,512 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to previously awarded contract N0024-16-C-2415 to exercise Option Year 3 for life cycle engineering and support services for the LPD 17 class amphibious transport dock ship program. The services include post-delivery planning and engineering; homeport technical support; class integrated product data environment; data maintenance and equipment management; systems integration and engineering support; LPD 17 class design services; research engineering; obsolescence management; class material readiness; emergent repair provision; training and logistics support; ship alteration development and installation; material management; operating cycle integration; availability planning; and configuration data management. Work will be performed in Pascagoula, Mississippi (96 percent); Norfolk, Virginia (1 percent); San Diego, California (1 percent); Mayport, Florida (1 percent); and Sasebo, Japan (1 percent), and is expected to be complete by December 2019. Fiscal 2012, 2016, 2017, 2019 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy); fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy); and fiscal 2019 research, development, test, and evaluation (Navy) funds in the amount of $19,057,104 will be obligated at time of award and contract funds in the amount of $18,017,669 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. Huntington Ingalls Inc., Pascagoula, Mississippi, is awarded a $28,573,043 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to previously-awarded contract N00024-17-C-2473 to exercise options for the accomplishment of the industrial post-delivery availability and planning, engineering and management efforts for the post-delivery planning yard services in support of the LHA 7 amphibious assault ship. Work will be performed in Pascagoula, Mississippi, and is expected to be completed by December 2019. Fiscal 2012 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy) funding in the amount of $21,200,000; and fiscal 2018 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy) funding in the amount of $2,355,011 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. Lockheed Martin Space, Sunnyvale, California is awarded $21,987,176 for cost-plus-fixed-fee modification P00017 under a previously awarded contract (N00030-17-C-0100) to exercise options for Trident II (D5) missile production and deployed system support. The work will be performed in Sunnyvale, California (61.25 percent); Denver, Colorado (36.04 percent); and Titusville, Florida (2.71 percent), and is expected to be completed Dec. 30, 2019. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test, and evaluation (Navy) funds in the amount of $21,987,176 are obligated on this award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Strategic Systems Programs, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. B.E. Meyers and Co. Inc.,* Redmond, Washington, is awarded a $10,348,345 delivery order (M67854-19-F-1529 0002) from a previously awarded firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (M67854-14-D-1040) for the purchase of 917 Ocular Interruption Systems. Work will be performed at Redmond, Washington, and is expected to be completed by Aug. 31, 2020. Fiscal 2019 procurement (Marine Corps) funds in the amount of $10,348,345 will be obligated at the time of award and no funds will expire the end of the current fiscal year. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Virginia, is the contracting activity. Harris Corp., Clifton, New Jersey, is awarded $9,835,000 for firm-fixed-price delivery order modification 000105 against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00016-16-G-0003) for production and qualification of ten Digital Receiver/Technique Generator Gen2 shipsets for the ALQ-214A(V)4/5 on-board jammer system in support of Foreign Military Sales (FMS) requirements. Two system spread benches are also being procured and delivered under this modification. Work will be performed in Clifton, New Jersey, and is expected to be completed in April 2020. FMS funds in the amount $9,835,000 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Raytheon Missile Systems, Tucson, Arizona, is awarded $8,988,458 for modification P00007 to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N0001917C0059) for engineering and technical support for the flight test demonstration of an extended range capability in support of the Joint Stand Off Weapon extended range Phase 3b development effort. Work will be performed in Tucson, Arizona, and is expected to be completed in January 2021. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation (Strategic Capabilities Office) funds in the amount of $661,621 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Rockwell Collins Inc., Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is awarded $8,704,807 for delivery order N0001919F0273 against a previously issued firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-fixed-fee, cost basic ordering agreement (N00019-14-G-0021) in support of the E-6B Mercury aircraft. This order provides for non-recurring engineering for the installation of the Digital Red Switch System (DRSS) kits into the Mission Avionics Systems Trainer (MAST), as well as the procurement of six DRSS kits for the aircraft and one for MAST. Work will be performed in Richardson, Texas, and is expected to be completed in September 2022. Fiscal 2018, and 2019 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $8,704,807will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Northrop Grumman Corp., Aerospace Systems, Melbourne, Florida, is awarded $7,993,664 for modification P00004 to cost-plus-fixed-price delivery order 0027 previously issued against a basic ordering agreement (N0001915G0026). This modification provides for the procurement of additional organic depot and intermediate level repair publications in support of the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft, including the structural repair manual and organic depot and intermediate level repair publications. Work will be performed in Melbourne, Florida (79.6 percent); St. Augustine, Florida (11.6 percent); Menlo Park, California (7.3 percent); and Bethpage, New York (1.5 percent), and is expected to be completed in September 2020. Fiscal 2017 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $7,993,664 will be obligated at time of award, all of which will expire at the end of the fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. TKH-ASI LLC,* Kahului, Hawaii, is awarded $7,744,000 for firm-fixed-price task order N6247819F4034 under a previously awarded, multiple award construction contract (N62478-16-D-4016) to repair unaccompanied housing Building 2, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Wahiawa Annex, Hawaii. The work to be performed provides for repair of Station B1 (located in Facility S1104) and interconnecting Station B1 with Station B29. Project work will include replacing old and deteriorated components in Station B1, adding a primary circuit and circuit breaker to Station B29, and installing underground feeder cables to interconnect and consolidate Stations B1 and B29. Work will be performed in Oahu, Hawaii, and is expected to be completed by February 2020. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $7,744,000 are obligated on this award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Three proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Hawaii, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, is the contracting activity. DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Honeywell International Inc., Phoenix, Arizona, has been awarded an $11,499,928 firm-fixed-price delivery order (SPRPA1-19-F-KQ1B) against a five-year basic ordering agreement (SPE4A1-17-G-0017) with no option periods for 11 auxiliary power units for the P-8 aircraft. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulations 6.302-1. This is an 11-month contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Arizona, with a Nov. 11, 2019, performance completion date. Using customers are Navy and the United Kingdom. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019, Navy working capital funds and Foreign Military Sales funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. *Small business https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1716020/source/GovDelivery/

  • After huge hack, Biden security picks want more cyber coordination with industry

    21 janvier 2021 | International, C4ISR, Sécurité

    After huge hack, Biden security picks want more cyber coordination with industry

    Andrew Eversden WASHINGTON — Two top national security nominees advocated Tuesday for stronger federal cybersecurity and increased collaboration with contractors in the aftermath of a supply chain breach that infiltrated numerous federal agencies. If confirmed, retired Army Gen. Lloyd Austin and Avril Haines, President-elect Joe Biden's nominees for defense secretary and director of national intelligence, respectively, would start their jobs in the middle of the national security community's assessment of damage from a cybersecurity breach pinned on Russian hackers. They gained access through software from SolarWinds, a major government contractor. “We must elevate cybersecurity as an imperative across the government in order to defend the American people and U.S. critical infrastructure,” Austin told the Senate Armed Services Committee in his answers to the lawmaker's advance policy questions. “Additionally, the government must continue to strengthen its partnership with the private sector to foster greater information sharing and collaboration.” So far, federal investigators have discovered breaches at “fewer than 10” federal agencies, though the Pentagon and intelligence community haven't confirmed whether their offices were among the victims. Haines, who served as deputy CIA director and deputy national security adviser to President Barack Obama, found it concerning that the breach first came to light through cybersecurity company FireEye, instead of through U.S. government cybersecurity operators. “[I] absolutely share ... concern that we're actually able to detect these because that's obviously absolutely critical to us protecting against them,” Haines said before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. “I think ... it was pretty alarming that we found out about it through a private company as opposed to our being able to detect it ourselves to begin with.” In response to the breach, Austin committed to reviewing the DoD's cyber posture and emphasized that Russia must be punished for infiltrating federal networks. In the advance questions, Austin stopped short of calling the breach an act of war, arguing that designation “requires a case-by-case and fact-specific determination.” “For example, malicious cyber activities could result in injury, death or significant property destruction,” Austin wrote. “These activities would need to be considered in their totality.” An early January announcement from several federal investigators, including the NSA and Office of the Director of National Intelligence, stated that the breach was believed to be an espionage campaign and “likely Russian in origin.” “If that's the case, I think Russia should be held accountable,” Austin said at the hearing. “That's my personal belief.” Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., who sits on both SASC and SSCI, called the breach “the greatest cyber intrusion in the history, I think, perhaps, of the world” and said that the stovepiped nature of the U.S. national security apparatus needed to be addressed. Reed said one challenge for Haines will be developing a “more coherent, cohesive, integrated approach” to dealing with cybersecurity threats, particularly from advanced nation-state actors. Under questioning from senators, Haines said the SolarWinds supply chain hack was a “grave threat,” and the government needs new to improve its defenses against such attacks, though she noted that she hasn't received a classified briefing on the intrusion. In 2019, a report from ODNI warned of growing software supply chain hacks that provide an “efficient way to bypass traditional defenses and compromise a large number of computers.” “To prevent a recurrence of this kind of attack, we need to close the gap between where our capabilities are now and where they need to be in order to deter, detect, disrupt and respond to such intrusions far more effectively in the future,” Haines wrote in her questionnaire. “If confirmed as DNI, I will review the expert conclusions from the SolarWinds incident and the current intelligence about supply chain vulnerabilities and what steps may be taken to address any vulnerabilities.” Haines told senators that she would assess how the intelligence community can improve its cybersecurity partnerships with industry and the whole federal government. “I believe that the IC plays an integral role in detecting and warning against nation-state targeting of U.S. networks and infrastructure,” she wrote. “If confirmed, I will examine how better collaboration between the IC and the rest of the U.S. government, coupled with closer partnerships with the private sector and our international allies, can enhance our ability to deter, detect, and mitigate cyberattacks.” Haines will review whether the intelligence community is allocating resources properly to face advanced cyber threats and will examine the adequacy of the IC's existing authorities to protect the digital infrastructure of the United States, she said. Austin pointed to a cyber-threat sharing partnership the department has with the defense industrial base and stated that the department should “continue to look for ways to better integrate with interagency partners and the private sector.” In light of the SolarWinds breach, the senators on SSCI wrote that they are worried about a “lack of mandatory threat information sharing between the private sector and government,” adding that any information sharing from the private sector after the breach is voluntary. Haines would review the relationship. “Information sharing between the IC and the private sector is increasingly important to ensure that our data systems and networks are secure,” she wrote. “If confirmed as DNI, I look forward to reviewing the Intelligence Community's data sharing and information exchange relationship with the private sector, to engaging with IC experts and private sector leaders on what information is currently being shared, and to examining the efficacy of the current framework for sharing threat information.” The incoming Biden administration has signaled that it will prioritize cybersecurity in the aftermath of the SolarWinds breach. The Biden team named Anne Neuberger, the NSA's cybersecurity director who worked to improve information sharing with the private sector, to National Security Council as deputy national security adviser for cyber and emerging technology. Haines wrote that she will “ensure” that the intelligence community has a “robust data sharing and information exchange relationship” with private companies and said that she will be “studying current information sharing to determine how it can be improved and what types of information can be shared to enhance cybersecurity protections.” “The private sector has unique insight and expertise on malicious activity occurring within its networks,” Haines said. “Real-time integration of private sector and government data could lead to more effective prevention and mitigation outcomes.” Cyber norms and deterrence For the last few years, the U.S. government wrestled with the concept of deterrence in the cyber domain, a complex challenge that including resilient defenses, risk management and strong international partnerships. As the SolarWinds breach demonstrated, deterring adversaries from hacking, which is seen as below the threshold of an armed response, is difficult. In response to a question from Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, about how to approach cyber deterrence, Haines pointed to many of the same tenets of current U.S. cyber deterrence, including imposition of costs for malicious actors' behavior, bringing foreign allies together to impose those costs, building resilient systems that are hard to hack, developing norms and creating strong relationship with the private sector. Haines wrote that setting norms should include outlining sanctionable behavior with the agreement from allies. A cornerstone to sanctioning is attributing cyberattacks to actors, a challenging undertaking in the cyber realm. Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., said he wanted Haines to be more forthcoming with attribution of cyberattacks, stating that he found it “extraordinarily concerning” that the “[Trump] White House underplay[ed] attribution on Russia.” Attribution, Haines said, would be a major piece of the ODNI's role in deterrence. “Something we [ODNI] can do is promote the ability to detect when adversaries are engaging in such activity so as then to provide information about attribution, for example. And then hold adversaries to account through that.” https://www.c4isrnet.com/cyber/2021/01/20/after-huge-hack-biden-security-picks-want-more-cyber-coordination-with-industry

  • US Air Force will buy E-7 Wedgetail in 2022, Boeing exec claims

    15 novembre 2021 | International, Aérospatial

    US Air Force will buy E-7 Wedgetail in 2022, Boeing exec claims

    “I’m very confident that the Air Force is choosing the E-7 to replace its E-3 fleet,” Mike Manazir, Boeing’s vice president for defense business development, said during a news conference ahead of the Dubai Airshow.

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