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May 25, 2023 | Local, Naval

Government of Canada announces major investment in Canadian Coast Guard’s small vessels fleet

Vancouver, British Columbia - Making sure that members of the Canadian Coast Guard have the equipment they need to keep Canada’s waterways navigable and safe is a key priority for the Government of Canada. That includes the Canadian Coast Guard’s small vessels, which play a critical role in our fleet, especially in shallow coastal waters and inland lakes and rivers where larger ships cannot operate.

Today, the Honourable Joyce Murray, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard announced a major investment to fund the completion of the renewal of the Canadian Coast Guard’s small vessels fleet.

The Honourable Helena Jaczek, Minister of Public Services and Procurement also took part in the announcement from St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, along with Joanne Thompson, Member of Parliament for St. John’s East and Churence Rogers, Member of Parliament for Bonavista—Burin—Trinity. The investment, valued at $2.5 billion, provides for up to 61 small vessels and the ongoing replacement of small craft, barges and work boats with new modern equipment.

This investment will help modernize the Canadian Coast Guard’s small vessel fleet, so that they can keep Canadian waterways and Canadians safe, while creating good-paying jobs across Canada.

This investment will complete the renewal of the Canadian Coast Guard’s small vessels fleet and enable the Canadian Coast Guard to acquire up to:

  • Six Mid-shore Multi-Mission Vessels;
  • One Near-Shore Fishery Research Vessel;
  • 16 Specialty Vessels comprised of:
    • Two Special NavAids Vessels;
    • Four Special Shallow Draft Buoy Tenders
    • Four Inshore Science Vessels
    • Four Special Enforcement Vessels
    • Two Lake Class Vessels;
  • Four Air Cushion Vehicles; and
  • 34 Cape Class Search and Rescue Lifeboats.

The procurement of these small vessels will provide opportunities for smaller shipyards and suppliers across Canada, supporting good-paying jobs in our marine industry.

The National Shipbuilding Strategy is creating jobs in Canada’s shipbuilding industry and marine sector, and providing Canadian Coast Guard members with the equipment they need to continue their important work. Under the National Shipbuilding Strategy, 16 small vessels including 14 Search and Rescue lifeboats and two Channel Survey and Sounding Vessels have been delivered to the Canadian Coast Guard.

Contracts under the National Shipbuilding Strategy are estimated to have contributed approximately $21.26 billion ($1.93 billion annually) to Canada’s gross domestic product, and created or maintained over 18,000 jobs annually between 2012 and 2022.

Quotes

“This is a critical investment that will help modernize the Canadian Coast Guard’s small vessel fleet. We are making sure the Canadian Coast Guard has the equipment it needs to keep Canadians and Canada’s waterways safe, while also creating good-paying jobs across the country.”

The Honourable Joyce Murray, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

“Through the National Shipbuilding Strategy, the government is providing the members of the Canadian Coast Guard with the ships they need to carry out their important work for Canadians. This significant investment also will create more jobs, generate significant economic benefits and help grow the marine industry throughout Canada.”

The Honourable Helena Jaczek, Minister of Public Services and Procurement

Quick facts

  • This additional $2.5 billion investment will enable the Canadian Coast Guard to further the renewal of its small vessel fleet through the acquisition of up to 61 small vessels, ensuring the Canadian Coast Guard has the modern equipment it needs to continue to provide vital services to Canadians.

  • Small vessels can provide search and rescue services as well as assistance to disabled vessels and support aid to navigation programs.

  • To date, under the National Shipbuilding Strategy, 16 small vessels have been delivered to Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Canadian Coast Guard. This includes 14 Search and Rescue lifeboats and two Channel Survey and Sounding Vessels. 

  • The Government of Canada’s National Shipbuilding Strategy is a long-term, multi-billion-dollar program focused on renewing the Canadian Coast Guard and Royal Canadian Navy fleets to ensure that Canada’s marine agencies have the modern ships they need to fulfill their missions, while revitalizing Canada’s marine industry, creating good middle-class jobs and ensuring economic benefits are realized across the country.

  • National Shipbuilding Strategy small vessels construction contracts awarded between 2012 and 2022 are estimated to contribute close to $389.4M ($32.4M annually) to the GDP, and create or maintain 293 jobs annually, through the marine industry and its Canadian suppliers, as well as consumer spending by associated employees.

Related products

https://www.canada.ca/en/canadian-coast-guard/news/2023/05/government-of-canada-announces-major-investment-in-canadian-coast-guards-small-vessels-fleet.html

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