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July 27, 2020 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - July 24, 2020

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

General Electric Aviation, Cincinnati, Ohio, has been awarded an estimated $259,403,817 modification (P00051) exercising the three-year option period of an eight-year base contract (SPE4AX-15-D-9412) with one three-year option period for supplies related to airplane engine platform support. This modification brings the total cumulative face value of the contract to $892,596,638 from $633,192,821. This is a firm-fixed-price, requirements-type contract. Location of performance is Ohio, with a May 31, 2023, performance completion date. Using customers are Air Force, Navy and Foreign Military Sales partner countries. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2020 through 2023 defense working capital funds and Foreign Military Sales funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Richmond, Virginia (SPE4AX-15-D-9412).

EFW Inc., Fort Worth, Texas, has been awarded a maximum $11,999,844 firm-fixed-price contract for Bradley Fighting Vehicle controller grip assemblies. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a three-year contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Texas, with a July 31, 2023, performance completion date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2020 through 2023 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Land and Maritime, Warren, Michigan (SPRDL1-20-D-0020).

Curtiss-Wright Defense Systems, Santa Clarita, California, has been awarded a maximum $7,532,963 firm-fixed-price contract for an advanced mission management system in support of the MQ4-C Triton aircraft program. This was a sole-source acquisition using Justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a 19-month contract with no option periods. Location of performance is California, with a Feb. 28, 2022, performance completion date. Using military service is Navy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2020 Navy operations, maintenance and procurement funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPRPA1-20-C-K019).

NAVY

RQ-DPR JV, Carlsbad, California, is awarded a $143,587,704 firm-fixed-price contract for the construction of Hurricane Florence Recovery Package 2, Headquarters, located at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The contract also contains 45 unexercised planned modifications and 19 unexercised options, which if exercised will increase the cumulative contract value to $178,308,510. Work will be performed in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. This contract provides replacements for buildings damaged during Hurricane Florence. The construction is divided into eight separate projects encompassing the following areas: Combat Logistics Battalion Headquarters Facilities; 2nd Marine Division Tank Battalion and Company Headquarters and Armory; Regimental Headquarters, 2nd Marine Division; 1/8 Battalion Headquarters; 24th and 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit Headquarters; 2nd Marine Division Transportation Support Battalion Headquarters; Environmental Management Division; and Marine Corps Advisor Battalion Headquarters. Work is expected to be completed by March 2025. Fiscal 2019 military construction (Marine Corps) contract funds in the amount of $120,616,899; and fiscal 2020 military construction (Marine Corps) contract funds in the amount of $22,970,805 are obligated on this award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the beta.SAM.gov website, and 13 proposals were received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (N40085-20-C-0044).

Archer Western Construction, Tampa, Florida, is awarded an $117,995,000 firm-fixed-price contract for the construction of Hurricane Florence Recovery Package 4, Bridges, located in Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Work will be performed in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. This contract provides replacements for bridges damaged during Hurricane Florence. The construction is divided into two separate projects encompassing a moveable bridge across the Intracoastal Waterway, the White Oak River and Queens Creek Trestles. Work is expected to be completed by March 2025. Fiscal 2019 military construction (Marine Corps) contract funds in the amount of $117,995,000 are obligated on this award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the beta.SAM.gov website, and six proposals were received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (N40085-20-C-8505).

American Petroleum Tankers LLC, Blue Bell, Pennsylvania, is awarded a $26,462,500 firm-fixed-price contract with reimbursable elements for the U.S. Flagged, West Coast, Jones Act tanker vessel M/T Empire State. This contract includes one 12-month firm period, three one-year options and one 11-month option period, which if exercised will bring the cumulative value of this contract to $190,364,159. Work will be performed worldwide, and is expected to be completed by July 2025. Transportation Working Capital Funds in the amount of $26,462,500 are obligated for fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2021, and will expire at the end of the fiscal 2021. This contract was competitively procured with proposals solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website, and two offers were received. The U.S. Navy's Military Sealift Command, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (N32205-20-C-4105).

Analysis, Computing & Engineering Solutions Inc., Columbia, Maryland, is awarded a $19,062,904 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) Systems design and development. This contract includes options which, if exercised, will bring the cumulative value of this contract to $100,273,144. Work will be performed in Washington, D.C. The services to be acquired consist of continuing advanced research and development for scientific, technical and engineering efforts associated with the development and integration of C4ISR systems. Work is expected to be completed by July 2025. Fiscal 2020 Working Capital Funds (Navy) in the amount of $2,395,802; and fiscal 2020 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) in the amount of $150,000 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured and three offers were received via Federal Business Opportunities (FedBizOpps). This contract was a negotiated acquisition under the authority of Title 10 U.S. Code 2304(b)(2), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.203. The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00173-20-C-6002).

Deloitte Consulting, Arlington, Virginia, is awarded a $13,296,822 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for complete engineering changes to the Order to Payment System (OTPS), also known as NEST. The objective of this contract is to enable effective management of the current Next Generation Enterprise Network contracts, as well as to obtain the full range of systems engineering, software engineering, project management, integration and application sustainment services to assist and support the Navy's Program Executive Office Digital and Enterprise Services to complete OPTS/NEST engineering changes. The three option periods, if exercised, will bring the cumulative value of this contract to an estimated $49,158,628. Work will be performed in Arlington, Virginia, and is expected to be completed by January 2024 if all options are exercised. $3,486,500 in fiscal 2020 operation and maintenance (Navy); and $5,456,500 in fiscal 2020 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funding will be applied to this contract after contract award. $3,486,500 of the obligated funds would have expired at the end of the current fiscal year if this award had not been made. This contract was not competitively procured because it is a sole source acquisition pursuant to the authority of 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1). There is only one responsible source under the Federal Acquisition Regulation subpart 6.302-1. The Naval Information Warfare Systems Command, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity (N00039-20-C-0011).

Oceanetics Inc., doing business as Truston Technologies,* Annapolis, Maryland, is awarded a $11,811,782 firm-fixed-price contract for the detailed design, fabrication and installation of a waterside security barrier (WSB) system at three commercial shipyards located in San Diego Bay: General Dynamics (National Steel and Shipbuilding Co.), BAE Systems Inc. and Huntington-Ingalls Industries. The effort will also include the training of personnel on the maintenance and operation of the WSB system and an initial suite of spares and repair parts. Work will be performed in Welch, West Virginia (75%); San Diego, California, (20%); and Annapolis, Maryland (5%). The new WSB will meet force protection requirements and allow for the cessation of manned security patrols. Work is expected to be completed by February 2022. Fiscal 2018 other procurement (Navy) funding in the amount of $11,811,782 will be obligated at time of award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, and three offers were received. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity (N00024-20-C-6303).

DRS Laurel Technologies, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, is awarded a $10,048,979 firm-fixed-price modification to previously awarded contract N00024-15-C-5228 to exercise options for the production of Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) AN/USG-3B equipment sets and installation and checkout replacement components. Work will be performed in Largo, Florida (60%); Johnstown, Pennsylvania (30%); and Menlo Park, California (10%). The CEC is a sensor netting system that significantly improves battle force capability by extracting and distributing sensor-derived information, such as the superset of data that is available to all participating CEC units. The CEC also improves overall situational awareness by enabling longer range, cooperative, multiple, or layered engagement strategies. Work is expected to be completed by January 2022. Fiscal 2020 aircraft procurement (Navy); fiscal 2020 other procurement (Navy); fiscal 2019 procurement Marine Corps; and fiscal 2018 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy) funding in the amount of $10,048,979 will be obligated at the time of award, and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Vigor Marine LLC, Portland, Oregon, is awarded a $10,000,000 modification to previously awarded contract N00024-19-C-4447 to support USS Chosin (CG 65) extended dry-docking selected restricted availability. Work will be performed in Seattle, Washington. This modification will provide docking and pier-side services to USS Chosin (CG 65) during the performance of the extended availability at Vigor Shipyard, Seattle, Washington. The contract will include all necessary docking and pier-side services, labor, material and equipment deemed necessary to support the performance of depot level repairs. Work is expected to be completed by October 2021. Fiscal 2020 other procurement (Navy) funding in the amount of $5,454,170 will be obligated at the time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance (Navy) funding in the amount of $4,545,830 will be obligated at the time of award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility, Bremerton, Washington, is the contracting activity.

ARMY

Airfield Contracting,* Columbus, Ohio, was awarded a $21,456,750 firm-fixed-price contract to repair airfield drainage at Laughlin Air Force Base. Bids were solicited via the internet with three received. Work will be performed in at Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas, with an estimated completion date of March 26, 2021. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance (Air Force) funds in the amount of $21,456,750 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth, Texas, is the contracting activity (W9126G-20-C-0026).

Government Marketing and Procurement LLC,* Wimberley, Texas, was awarded an $18,000,000 modification (P00005) to contract W912DY-18-D-0024 for Vocera wireless hands-free communications systems and supporting hardware/software infrastructure. Work will be performed in Wimberley, Texas, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 1, 2023. Fiscal 2020 Defense Health Program funds in the amount of $18,000,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntsville, Alabama, is the contracting activity.

AIR FORCE

Kearney & Company P.C., Alexandria, Virginia, has been awarded an $11,119,320 firm-fixed-price modification (P00011) to contract FA7014-18-F-1022 for advisory and assistance support. This modification exercises Option Year Two that continues support for Total Force analysis to include capability and capacity analysis of Air Force mission areas; linking results to the strategy, planning, and programming process; performing planning, programming, and budgeting study excursions; analytically supporting Total Force initiatives, strategy review and assessment, and planning support. Work will be performed in Washington, D.C., and if all options are exercised, work is expected to be completed July 31, 2023. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition with one offer received. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $5,399,055 are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force District of Washington Contracting Directorate, Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

*Small Business

https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Contracts/Contract/Article/2287902/source/GovDelivery/

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  • Sea-Air-Space Exposition 2019 Day One

    May 7, 2019 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land

    Sea-Air-Space Exposition 2019 Day One

    By Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brittney Kinsey, Defense Media Activity Public Affairs NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. (NNS) -- Sea service chiefs and civilian defense leadership discussed myriad opportunities and challenges commanders face while operating on land, sea and air during the first day of the 54th annual Sea-Air-Space Exposition (SAS), May 6, 2019. Derived from the Chief of Naval Operations' (CNO) Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority 2.0 (Design 2.0), this year's exposition theme is “Sustainability, Agility, Superiority.” CNO Adm. John. M. Richardson, Commandant of the Marine Corps General Robert B. Neller, Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard Adm. Karl Schultz and Administrator of the U.S. Maritime Administration retired Rear Adm. Mark H. Buzby each addressed during the sea service chiefs panel the specific obstacles their services contend with in the current maritime environment. Richardson explained that rapid changes in technology and maritime security requires a level of trust and confidence in leaders tasked with commanding maritime forces. “It's very important that our leaders are people of character and integrity so that when we put them in front of our Sailors to lead them, not only do they know their business in warfighting but also that we would be proud for our sons and daughters to follow them,” he said. “Whether at sea or near the sea, responding to any man-made or natural crisis, [they] are so much more than a maritime warrior, [they] are also diplomats and are securing our prosperity.” Richardson also stressed the importance of improving the logistical capabilities, stating that services will only maintain an upper hand in the maritime environment by becoming more agile. ‘'We have got to get capabilities into the hands of our soldiers, Sailors, airmen and Marines – more and faster,” he said. “It's important that as the pace quickens, as new technology enters the fray, as the security environment manifests itself in a really fast-changing world that we don't forget those fundamentals in terms of providing sustainable forces. ” During a panel on the Arctic, speakers explained why partnering with other services is also crucial to maintaining superiority, particularly in places like the Arctic Circle where there hasn't been a large naval presence. “When it comes to maritime readiness in the Arctic, we cannot and should not go alone,” said Rear Adm. John A. Okon, commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. “Collaboration is key. Resources and access points are limited, so we must work with our maritime partners to be successful.” Richardson echoed Okon's comments during his keynote remarks at the Sea Services Luncheon. “The Arctic is a very dynamic situation,” he said. “There are seaways that are open that were not open before, continental shelves that are being exposed that weren't exposed before, so I think that merits a response from our maritime forces and there's tremendous value in partnering with our fellow services such as the Coast Guard.” Keeping the waters open for Indo-Pacific trade routes, which bolster global economic prosperity, also remains a top priority for the Navy. “A third of the world's trade flows through the South China Sea, 90% of the world's trade flows by the sea, tens of trillions of U.S. dollars flow through that body of water,” said Richardson. “It's extremely important that those lines of communication and sea lanes remain open, and that's why the United States Navy is there and that's why we're going to stay there.” Other scheduled keynote speakers and panelists include Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer, Undersecretary of the Navy Thomas Modly, Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development and Acquisition James “Hondo” Geurts and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Russell Smith. Founded in 1965 and the largest maritime exposition in the United States, SAS brings together the U.S. defense industrial base, private sector U.S. companies and key military decision makers for an annual event to share the most current policies, programs, information and technology relevant to maritime service. SAS takes place May 6-8 and will include speaker and professional development sessions and dynamic maritime and defense exhibits on the latest technology and military equipment. https://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=109502

  • Here are the biggest weaknesses in America’s defense sector

    July 2, 2019 | International, Security, Other Defence

    Here are the biggest weaknesses in America’s defense sector

    By: Aaron Mehta WASHINGTON — Production of a component vital to protecting American troops from chemical attacks that can't keep up with need. Key suppliers of aircraft parts that could go bankrupt at any time. A key producer of missile components that closed for two years before the Pentagon found out. These are just some of the key findings of an annual report from the Pentagon judging the greatest risks to the defense industrial sector, underlining that while the overall defense industry continues to bring in massive profits, not all is well among the suppliers of key components that, while small pieces of larger systems, could impact America's ability to wage war. The annual “Industrial Capabilities” report, quietly released May 13 by the Defense Department's Office of Manufacturing and Industrial Base Policy, found that despite total dollars spent by the department on weapons and ammunition increasing year over year since 2016, the number of vendors supplying them has decreased. In addition, while the report found generally positive trends for the U.S. defense sector, it did warn that in certain areas, foreign weapon sales are decreasing. For instance, the U.S. saw its market share of global naval weapon exports go from 63 percent in 2007 to just 17 percent in 2017. And from 2008-2017, two reliable buyers of U.S. defense goods — Pakistan and South Korea — saw their U.S. procurement percentages drop. Pakistan went from 31 percent to 12 percent, while South Korea went from 78 percent to 53 percent. This is the first Industrial Capabilities report to be published since the October release of a White House-mandated study on the defense-industrial base. That study concluded, in part, that the government needs to increase use of its Defense Production Act Title III authorities, which allows the government to expend funds to support key production lines that might now otherwise survive. The latest report says that through March 2019, seven presidential determinations were issued to address “key industrial base shortfalls in lithium sea-water batteries, alane fuel cell technology, sonobuoys production, and critical chemicals production for missiles and munitions.” However, details of those agreements, such as how much funding might go toward fixing the issues, were pushed into a nonpublic appendix. Here are the biggest concerns, broken down by sector: Aircraft: The report cites long product and system development timelines, high costs for development and qualification, and limits on production as broad issues in the aircraft sector. Those issues are inherent in major defense programs, but the report also calls out the aging workforce and consolidation among the industrial base, which “has expanded into the sub-tiers of the supply chain, creating additional risks for single or sole source vendors.” As an example, the report notes there are only four suppliers with the ability to manufacture “large, complex, single-pour aluminum and magnesium sand castings” needed to make key parts of military aircraft. These four suppliers face “perpetual financial risk and experience bankruptcy threats” due to the insecure nature of Pentagon funding. “The single qualified source for the upper, intermediate, and sump housing for a heavy-lift platform for the Marines has experienced quality issues and recently went through bankruptcy proceedings,” the report adds. “Without a qualified or alternate qualified source for these castings, the program will face delays, impeding the U.S. ability to field heavy-lift support to Marine Corps expeditionary forces.” Finding qualified software engineers is another issue identified, with the report warning it is “increasingly difficult to hire skilled, cleared, and capable software engineers. As aircraft continue to increase in software complexity, it will become even more important for the sector to hire skilled software engineers.” Ground systems: The report says the Pentagon's plan of incremental updates to existing systems rather than wholesale new designs has created “a generation of engineers and scientists that lack experience in conceiving, designing, and constructing new, technologically advanced combat vehicles.” But the same issues of consolidation and lack of budget stability that showed up in the aircraft sector impact the ground vehicle sector. “Legislation and DoD industrial policy requires DoD to manufacture all large-caliber gun barrels, howitzer barrels, and mortar tubes at one organic DoD arsenal,” the report cites as an example. “There is only one production line at the arsenal for all of these items, and policy modifications to meet demand and surge from overseas have led to a lack of capacity to meet current production requirements.” Shipbuilding sector: When it comes to maritime vessels, the “most significant risks found were a dependence on single and sole source suppliers, capacity shortfalls, a lack of competition, a lack of workforce skills, and unstable demand,” the report found. The lack of competition goes from the highest levels, where four companies control the seven shipyards building military vessels, to the lowest components, such as “high-voltage cable, propulsor raw material, valves, and fittings.” Workforce concerns also dominate the shipbuilding sector. The report cites statistics from the Department of Labor predicting that between 2018 and 2026, there will be a 6–17 percent decrease in U.S. jobs in occupations critical to Navy shipbuilding projects, “such as metal layout (ship-fitting), welding, and casting.” If that is not addressed, a lack of skilled workers “will significantly impact the shipbuilding industry's ability to meet the Navy's long-term demand.” Munitions sector: A major concern in last year's annual report was the future of the U.S. munitions sector, and many of those issues remain in the 2019 version. The report identified “multiple risks and issues, including material obsolescence and lack of redundant capability, lack of visibility into sub-tier suppliers causing delays in the notification of issues, loss of design and production skill, production gaps and lack of surge capacity planning, and aging infrastructure to manufacture and test the products.” As an example, the report points to a voltage control switch, used in ignition devices and flight termination systems for Department of Defense missiles. Several years ago, the foundry that made a key component for the switch was purchased by another foundry, which then decided to close the factory. The Pentagon was not informed until two years after the foundry was closed, at which point “it became evident that the end-of-life buy, which was designed to last from three to five years, would only last six months.” In another case, two key chemicals in solid-fuel rocket motors became obsolete, requiring the DoD to scramble for potential replacements. Chemical, biological and radiological sector: The chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense sector provides protection for war fighters through items like respirators, masks and vaccines. But the report found serious issues regarding the industrial base's ability to provide that capabilities, indicating that Title III authorities might be needed in the near future to maintain production. As an example, the report points to production of ASZM‑TEDA1 impregnated carbon, a defense-unique material with only a single qualified source that, as a result, “precludes assurances for best quality and price.” The carbon is used in 72 chemical, biological and nuclear filtration systems, and the report notes that current sourcing arrangements “cannot keep pace with demand.” The DoD is already using Title III to modernize the production line and try to establish a second source for the material. Soldier systems: The collapse of the American textile market over the last three decades has left the department depending on single sources or foreign suppliers for soldier systems. Additionally, battery production is identified as a potential future issue. “Lack of stable production orders has resulted in lost capability and capacity, increased surge lead times, workforce erosion, and inhibited investments by remaining suppliers. Surge-capacity-limiting constraints occur at several points along the value chain, from raw material to final battery assembly,” the report says. Space systems: Aside from major issues around future threats to space assets from near-peer competitors, the report identifies major industrial base concerns for space as including “aerospace structures and fibers, radiation-hardened microelectronics, radiation test and qualification facilities, and satellite components and assemblies.” Other areas include solar panel development — “There is not enough space business for companies to justify R&D to improve cells without [government] help,” the report says — the erosion of the traveling-wave tube industry, and a lack of suppliers for key parts needed to produce precision gyroscopes needed for spacefaring systems. Electronics: The Pentagon has been sounding the alarm about China's growing power in the printed circuit board market, and this report continues that trend. The United States now accounts for only 5 percent of global production, representing a 70 percent decrease from $10 billion in 2000 to $3 billion in 2015, per the report. Meanwhile, almost half of global production comes from China. https://www.defensenews.com/pentagon/2019/06/27/here-are-the-biggest-weaknesses-in-americas-defense-sector/

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