Back to news

October 27, 2022 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security, Other Defence

Biden seeks 'right technology investment' in National Defense Strategy

Along with investments in directed-energy and hypersonics, the strategy would make U.S. a '€œfast-follower'€ in artificial intelligence and autonomy.

https://www.c4isrnet.com/cyber/2022/10/27/biden-seeks-right-technology-investment-in-national-defense-strategy/

On the same subject

  • Rheinmetall to supply Germany’s Federal Police with protective vest inserts

    December 7, 2018 | International, Land

    Rheinmetall to supply Germany’s Federal Police with protective vest inserts

    Rheinmetall has won an order to supply the German Federal Police with ballistic inserts for protective vests. The framework agreement lasts 36 months and is worth a total of around €10 million. Representing roughly €1 million in sales, a first batch consisting of over 5,000 ballistic inserts will be shipped in spring 2019. The contract encompasses an option for the supply of an additional 36,000 inserts. Developed and produced by Rheinmetall Ballistic Protection in Krefeld, Germany, the inserts exploit the latest technology in order to achieve high protection at the lowest possible weight. Among the lightest of their kind, these inserts withstand shots fired from an AK-47 assault rifle. As a result, law enforcement officers who find themselves in complex, life-threatening situations are not only well protected, but able to manoeuvre easily as well. Rheinmetall – a powerful partner of the police and security services Headquartered in Düsseldorf, Rheinmetall AG is a publicly traded, globally operating technology group. It consists of two operational units: Rheinmetall Defence and Rheinmetall Automotive. In 2017 the Group's 23,000 employees generated sales of just under €6 billion. Rheinmetall feels a special obligation to make the best-possible equipment available to those whose task it is to protect our society. Its Public Security product portfolio – tailored to meet the needs of law enforcement agencies and security services – covers a wide array of capabilities, ranging from reconnaissance and surveillance to command and control, cyber operations, kinetics, force protection and tactical mobility. https://www.rheinmetall-defence.com/en/rheinmetall_defence/public_relations/news/latest_news/index_18816.php

  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - August 20, 2019

    August 21, 2019 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - August 20, 2019

    DEFENSE THREAT REDUCTION AGENCY Applied Research Associates Inc., Albuquerque, New Mexico, is being awarded a maximum ceiling $240,000,000, cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract with a five-year base ordering period and an additional five-year option period. Competitive proposals were solicited and two offers were received. The contract provides for 24/7/365 technical reachback operational and decision support analysis, as well as research and development, to develop and advance the Defense Threat Reduction Agency's (DTRA's) weapons of mass destruction operational support capabilities. The work will be performed at multiple DTRA locations, primarily at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $150,000 (the guaranteed minimum) are being obligated at time of award. DTRA, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, is the contracting activity (HDTRA1-19-D-0007). ARMY The Boeing Co., Mesa, Arizona, was awarded a $154,890,000 modification (P00026) to contract W58RGZ-16-C-0023 to procure new-build Apache AH 64E helicopters. Work will be performed in Mesa, Arizona, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2022. Fiscal 2018 and 2019 aircraft procurement, Army funds in the amount of $154,890,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity. Berg Manufacturing Inc.,* Spokane Valley, Washington, was awarded a $44,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for a self-service laundry system. Bids were solicited via the internet with six received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 19, 2024. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity (W911QY-19-D-0027). DynCorp International LLC, McLean, Virginia, was awarded a $32,753,836 time-and-materials contract to train, advise and assist. Bids were solicited via the internet with three received. Work will be performed in Afghanistan with an estimated completion date of Aug. 19, 2020. Fiscal 2019 Afghanistan security forces, Army funds in the amount of $32,753,836 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, is the contracting activity (W560MY-19-C-0002). Manson Construction Co., Seattle, Washington, was awarded a $24,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for rental of a cutterhead pipeline dredge for dredging in Mobile Harbor, Alabama. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Oct. 13, 2020. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W91278-19-D-0040). Manufacturing Support Industries Inc.,* Salisbury, Maryland, was awarded a $9,500,000 firm-fixed-price contract for M240 lightweight adjustable bipod. Bids were solicited via the internet with seven received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 20, 2024. U.S. Army Contracting Command, New Jersey, is the contracting activity (W15QKN-19-D-0097). AIR FORCE Akima Intra‐Data LLC, Colorado Springs, Colorado, has been awarded a $152,871,144 firm-fixed-price contract for Facility Support Services II. This contract will provide for industrial and test security; security services; command, control, and communication functions; fire and emergency services; environmental; safety; occupational and environmental health; base supply; cargo movement, and vehicle maintenance at Arnold Engineering Development Complex. Work will be performed at Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee, with specific performance at White Oak, Maryland; and Moffett Field, California, and is expected to be completed by Nov. 30, 2027. This award is the result of a competitive small business set-aside acquisition utilizing a single solicitation and received two offers. No funds are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Test Center, Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee, is the contracting activity (FA9101‐19‐C‐1000). The Stratagem Group Inc., Aurora, Colorado,* has been awarded a $32,600,866 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for Radio Frequency Identification, Detection, and Geolocation of Emitting Systems software/hardware. This contract provides for improved collection and processing capabilities across multiple intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance sensing sources in the detection and characterization of priority radar waveforms. Work will be performed at Aurora, Colorado, and is expected to be complete by Aug. 19, 2024. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and two offers were received. The Air Force Research Laboratory, Rome, New York, is the contracting activity (FA8750-19-C-0072). NAVY BAE Systems Information and Electronic Systems, Nashua, New Hampshire, is awarded a $74,990,530 firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to procure 1,440 Radio Frequency Countermeasures and the maintenance and repair of multi-function test stations in support of the F-35 aircraft. Work will be performed in Nashua, New Hampshire (74%); Landenberg, Pennsylvania (7%); Topsfield, Massachusetts (2.5%); Industry, California (1.6%); Hamilton, New Jersey (1.5%); Carson, California (1.3%); Dover, New Hampshire (1.1%); Londonderry, New Hampshire (1%); Chartley, Massachusetts (1%); and various locations within the continental U.S. (9%), and is expected to be completed in March 2022. Fiscal 2017, 2018 and 2019 aircraft procurement (Air Force); fiscal 2019 procurement ammunition (Navy, Marine Corps); and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) funds in the amount of $74,990,530 will be obligated at time of award, $2,394,867 of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract combines purchases for the Air Force ($37,068,372; 49%); Navy and Marine Corps ($13,556,992; 18%); and FMS countries ($24,365,166; 33%). This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1). The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity (N00019-19-C-0001). Sikorsky Aircraft Corp., a Lockheed Martin Co., Stratford, Connecticut, is awarded $48,325,008 for firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-fixed-fee order N00019-19-F-4126 against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00019-19-G-0029) to procure spare parts to repair and maintain CH-53K low-rate initial production Lot Three configuration aircraft. Work will be performed in Quebec, Canada (14.88%); Stratford, Connecticut (9.17%); Fort Walton Beach, Florida (2.32%); Rome, New York (2.06%); Bridgeport, West Virginia (2.02%); Chesterfield, Missouri (1.52%); Forest, Ohio (1.47%); Davenport, Iowa (1.38%); Rochester, Kent, United Kingdom (1.36%); Milford, Connecticut (1.22%); Windsor Locks, Connecticut (1.13%); various locations within the continental U.S. (53.97%); and various locations outside the continental U.S. (7.50%), and is expected to be completed in August 2024. Fiscal 2019 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $48,325,008 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Raytheon Missile Systems, Tucson, Arizona, is awarded a $13,248,183 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to previously awarded contract N00024-17-C-5410 to exercise options for engineering and technical services in support of Standard Missile-2/6. This contract combines purchases for the U.S. government (96%); and the governments of Australia, Taiwan, Germany, Denmark, Korea and Japan (4% total) under the Foreign Military Sales program. Work will be performed in Tucson, Arizona, and is expected to be complete by December 2020. This contract includes options which, if exercised, be complete by April 2022. Fiscal 2019 and 2017 weapons procurement (Navy); fiscal 2019 and 2018 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy); fiscal 2019 other Department of Defense; and Foreign Military Sales (governments of Australia, Germany, Denmark, Taiwan, Korea and Japan) funding in the amount of $13,248,183 will be obligated at time of award and not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This modification is not competitively procured in accordance with 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1) and Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1(a)(2)(iii). The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Campbellsville Apparel Co., Campbellsville, Kentucky, has been awarded a maximum $7,562,400 modification (P00006) exercising the third one-year option period of a one-year base contract (SPE1C1-16-D-1083) with four one-year option periods for fuel handler's undershirts and moisture wicking t-shirts. This is an indefinite-delivery contract. Location of performance is Kentucky, with a Sept. 7, 2020, performance completion date. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2020 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. *Small Business https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Contracts/Contract/Article/1939263/source/GovDelivery/

  • ‘Red Air’ providers prep for a big year of war games

    January 14, 2020 | International, Aerospace

    ‘Red Air’ providers prep for a big year of war games

    By: Valerie Insinna WASHINGTON — Last year, the Air Force tapped seven defense companies for a $6.4 billion opportunity for “Red Air” training where contracted pilots pose as aggressors in air-to-air combat. With the fiscal 2020 budget finally approved, those firms are hungry to hear for more information about when and where they start flying. The companies — Air USA Inc., Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), Blue Air Training, Coastal Defense, Draken International, Tactical Air Support and Top Aces Corp. — currently find themselves waiting for the next phase of the competition, when the Air Force will issue individual work orders for a total of 22 bases that will allow contractors to begin flying this year. “I think we've all watched the Air Force program develop over the last two years kind of in awe at the size of it and the ambition, the commitment they're making to have enough adversaries out there to challenge their pilots,” said Russ Bartlett, CEO of Textron Airborne Solutions, which is the parent company of ATAC. “That's great for industry, because the Air Force knows they need to do that.” Unlike major programs for weapon systems, which have a dedicated line item in the budget, the work orders for adversary air services will be paid out of the operations and maintenance account, which is more flexible. While the Air Force's FY20 budget request flags a $151 million increase for “contract air training,” it's unclear how much of that amount will ultimately be set aside for that adversary air services. It will be up to Air Combat Command “to decide how much money they're going to put against the adversary air budget. So we're really just waiting to figure out how that all works,” said Russ Quinn, president of Top Aces. “We and the program office are looking very forward to hearing how Air Combat Command is planning on funding the contract.” Draken International is already conducting aggressor flights at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., as part of a five-year contract awarded in 2018. That work is helping the company keep its Red Air planes ready ahead of work at other bases, said Sean Gustafson, Draken's vice president of business development. "We're flying 6,000 to 7,000 hours a year out there right now,” he said. “We're excited for the task orders to come out shortly, looking to expand and set up operations on the East Coast and then supporting those bases.” The Draken pilots, who currently fly the Aero Vodochody L-159E Honey Badger and Douglas A-4 Skyhawk, regularly deploy from Nellis AFB and visit other installations, including Hill AFB in Utah, Eglin AFB in Fla., and Holloman AFB in N.M. The company will begin adding Mirage F1s to the mix next month, Gustafson said. “We're very excited about that, because that will be the first radar-equipped, supersonic aircraft in the industry. We have the first three [of 24 total] going out there in February,” he said. The company has also purchased 12 radar- equipped, supersonic Atlas Cheetah fighters that will help cover Air Force requirements outside of Nellis. Meanwhile, the other companies are doing training and modifications necessary to get their aggressor fleets ready to fly whenever the U.S. Air Force decides it needs those planes. Top Aces has purchased 29 used F-16s from an undisclosed user specifically for the Air Force's adversary air contract. Those aircraft are not yet in the United States, but Quinn is confident that the company will have the aircraft in hand in early spring, he said. After that, Top Aces will begin modifying each jet with an open architecture system that will allow the company to more easily outfit the aircraft with a range of radar, sensors, electronic warfare pods or other technologies that increase the capability of Red Air forces, he said. Depending on whether the company wins a contract with Germany for adversary air services, it may also have excess capacity with its Douglas A-4N Skyhawk fleet, which it could also offer to help supplement the U.S. Air Force's needs, Quinn said. ATAC plans to use its new fleet of Mirage F1 jets to meet the Air Force's requirements. So far, the company has fully trained one F1 pilot, who flew the first ATAC Mirage in August. Another two pilots were set to begin training in December, Bartlett said late last year. “On the airplane side, we're in really good shape. Sixty-three airplanes is a huge win for us. There are a lot of economies of scale that we intend to capitalize on,” he said. “The challenge is going to be — of course — hiring and retaining pilots. The services are trying keep their pilots and grow their pilot cadres; the airlines are hiring aggressively and paying lucrative salaries, and this industry is growing by leaps and bounds with just this Air Force program.” So far, recruiting pilots has not been a problem for Draken, Gustafson said. The company has employed 52 aggressor pilots to meet the demands of its contract with Nellis, and has a “stack of resumes” from pilots that jobs as the company expands to other bases. “We're doing well on [hiring],” he said. “Some folks, they don't want to go to the airlines. They recently retired from the military and they want to keep flying fighters.” The company is looking to grow its fleet with new aircraft, as well, he added. “We should have some pretty exciting news about five to six months from now,” he said. https://www.defensenews.com/air/2020/01/13/red-air-providers-prep-for-a-big-year

All news