28 mai 2020 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

Post-pandemic world presents real opportunity to change U.S.-Canada relationship, experts say

Post-pandemic world presents real opportunity to change U.S.-Canada relationship, experts say

By AIDAN CHAMANDY MAY 27, 2020

As the COVID-19 pandemic rages and the American election gets closer, Canadian foreign policy experts weigh in on how the pandemic has affected bilateral relations, and where we go from here.

As the November U.S. presidential election approaches, with the prospect of a second-Trump term a real possibility, and the COVID-19 pandemic upending life on both sides of the border, some Canadian foreign policy experts say they expect the fallout from the pandemic will have a lasting effect on the bilateral relationship and the post-pandemic period presents a good opportunity for Canadian foreign policy practitioners to take novel approaches to the age-old problem of over reliance on trade with the United States, regardless of who sits behind the Resolute desk on Jan. 20, 2021.

One of the most high-profile issues currently facing the relationship is managing the nearly 6,500-kilometre border, especially as both countries begin to gradually reopen and COVID-19 cases continue to spike in certain locales.

Both countries have agreed to keep the border closed to non-essential travellers until at least June 21. Certain cross-border health-care workers are permitted entry to either country, and trade and commerce continue to flow. Refugee claimants who cross into Canada at official points of entry and meet certain eligibility criteria under the Safe Third Country Agreement are also allowed to enter.

The decision on when and how to open the border will likely become a much more difficult issue to manage as time passes, given the divergent political incentives of U.S. President Donald Trump and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (Papineau, Que.), said Christopher Sands, director of the D.C.-based Wilson Center's Canada Institute.

The two leaders' differing political incentives are based “on the election cycle and the economy,” Mr. Sands said. “Trudeau was hit in the last election, but his election is behind him and he has a huge advantage because of the official opposition leader's weakness.”

On the economic front, however, Mr. Sands said, is where Mr. Trudeau's job gets trickier.

“Canada's economy was almost in recession in the fourth quarter of 2019. Canada is going into a recession and has been performing bad, economically, for some time. Mr. Trudeau is not in a strong position,” Mr. Sands said.

Canadian gross domestic product (GDP) growth was largely flat from the third quarter to the fourth quarter of 2019, and that trend continued into early 2020 with factors such as rail disruptions contributing to the slow growth, according to data from Statistics Canada. In March, GDP dropped nine per cent and the most recent Labour Force Survey data showed more than three million Canadians have lost their jobs due to the pandemic.

Because Canada's economy was already a poor performer prior to the pandemic, Mr. Sands said it behooves Mr. Trudeau to take an extremely cautious approach to reopening the border and to continue to emphasize the centrality of public health in the decision.

“It's in his interest to say ‘safety first,'” Mr. Sands said. “As long as COVID is on everyone's mind, he has a perfect thing to blame for hard economic times.”

The incentives for President Trump are almost exactly the opposite.

“The U.S. has an election in November and Trump was going into it with a much stronger economy. He was planning to run on good times, but then COVID throws everything into question. He's got a political and economic interest in moving forward, but Trudeau doesn't,” Mr. Sands said.

With the border closed until at least June 21, many would-be travellers on both sides have found their vacation plans interrupted. As the world adjusts to the new and yet-unforeseen norms of international travel post-pandemic, the U.S. will become an even more attractive target for Canadians looking to get away, said Sarah Goldfeder, principal at Earnscliffe Strategy Group and a fellow with the Canadian Global Affairs Institute.

“The reason a lot of people go from Canada to the U.S. isn't because they want to see things, it's because they want to see people,” Ms. Goldfeder said.

As the pandemic has and continues to prevent families with members on either side of the border from travelling to see each other, Ms. Goldfeder said she expects vacations to be “centred around seeing family, and the reality for many Canadians is their family is on the other side of the border.”

However, Ms. Goldfeder also said security will be tightened.

“It's going to be a long time before we take for granted crossing the border like we used to,” she said. “There will be more pressure to account for where and why you're going. There will be longer conversations about who you're going to see and how long you're staying.”

Time to diversify trade options, say experts

While the border and all the downstream implications are a more pressing problem, for some experts the pandemic and four years of the Trump administration—with four more potentially on the horizon—have highlighted the need for a renewed push for rethinking trade diversification and the broader relationship with the Americans.

Fear of over-reliance on the United States for economic prosperity and external security has long pervaded Canadian foreign policy thinking. In 1972, foreign minister Mitchell Sharp articulated the “Third Option” doctrine in an article published in International Perspectives. Mr. Sharp tried to answer the question of how to live “distinct from, but in harmony with” the United States, as rising nationalist tides hit the shores of both countries. He argued against increased integration with the U.S. in favour of a trade diversification and a national industrial strategy emphasizing Canadian ownership.

The proceeding years saw the creation of institutions such as the Foreign Investment Review Agency and Petro-Canada that addressed Canadian ownership issues. Trade diversification, however, did not bear the same fruit. The 1982 Macdonald Commission recommended taking a “leap of faith” and signing a free trade agreement with the U.S. In the late-1980s, the U.S.-Canada Free Trade Agreement, which later became NAFTA, made Canada and the U.S. two most of the most integrated economies, and countries, in the world.

Then came Mr. Trump's claim that NAFTA was “perhaps the worst trade deal ever made” and his administration's subsequent efforts to renegotiate the deal, ending with the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA), which comes into effect on July 1.

“One of the fundamental damaging things Trump has done to the relationship is shaken Canadians' trust in the U.S. in ways that have been profound and radical. Threatening the destruction of the Canadian economy resonated deeply in Canada,” said Eric Miller, president of Rideau-Potomac Strategy Group and fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute.

Canadians have mistrusted U.S. presidents before, Mr. Miller said, but where unpopular leaders like George W. Bush were perceived as “cowboys that would do bad things that harm the world,” Mr. Trump is entirely different.

“There was no sense under [Ronald] Reagan or George W. Bush that the U.S. was deliberately going to use its power to injure Canada. Canada might be excluded from certain things, but there was no sense that we [the U.S] are going to destroy your economy,” Mr. Miller said. “Canada now has to make choices about co-operation on bigger picture issues, on economic issues that it hasn't had to contemplate much in the past.”

The Liberals' 2018 fall economic statement announced the federal government's intention to increase non-U.S. exports by 50 per cent by 2025. Attached to the announcement was a $1.1-billion investment over six years to beef up trade resources and infrastructure for exporters.

Mr. Miller said that is a welcome investment, but new ideas in addition to new money will be required for diversification to be successful.

“When Canada looks for models it tends to look at the Anglosphere. Neither the U.S. or U.K. are good models because Canada needs a mid-sized country that trades a lot,” he said.

Mr. Miller said countries like Japan have successfully grown their respective trade volumes by reducing the risk of exporting, something Canada has not done well.

Japan deploys a model dubbed “Consortium for a New Export Nation,” wherein the Japanese government essentially approaches a partner country and fronts it money for an infrastructure project to be built by Japanese companies, ensuring future servicing of the infrastructure will also be done by Japanese companies. The model incorporates small, medium, and large companies, which Mr. Miller said would be essential to replicate in Canada's SME-driven economy.

Just as Mr. Miller said Canadian trade policy needs to take advantage of the geopolitical environment, James L. Anderson, an external fellow at the Centre for International and Defence Policy at Queen's University, said he believes Canadian foreign policy is in a similar position.

Mr. Anderson said the Trump administration's focus on the domestic challenges of the pandemic creates space for global leadership on infectious disease co-operation, especially as the World Health Organization comes under heavy criticism from multiple countries, which he said Canada is well-positioned to fill.

Whereas the WHO is made up of all 193 United Nations countries save for Liechtenstein, Mr. Anderson sees value in a smaller body tasked with handling infectious diseases, what he calls “an infectious disease analogue to the G7.” Pursuing such a policy could be a boon to Canada's campaign for a UN Security Council seat, too, Mr. Anderson said.

https://www.hilltimes.com/2020/05/27/post-pandemic-world-presents-real-opportunity-to-change-u-s-canada-relationship-experts-say/249721

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  • The US military ran the largest stress test of its sealift fleet in years. It’s in big trouble.

    2 janvier 2020 | International, Naval

    The US military ran the largest stress test of its sealift fleet in years. It’s in big trouble.

    By: David B. Larter WASHINGTON — The U.S. military in September ordered the largest stress test of its wartime sealift fleet in the command's history, with 33 out of 61 government-owned ships being activated simultaneously. The results were bad, according to a new report. In an unclassified U.S. Transportation Command report posted to its website, the so-called turbo activation revealed that less than half of the sealift fleet would be fully prepared to get underway for a major sealift operation in a crisis. “The relatively low ... Qualitative Mission Success Rate indicates the Organic Surge Fleet is challenged to be immediately available for a large-scale inter-theater force deployment without delays/impacts to force closure due to degraded readiness,” the report read. The Dec. 16 report confirms what senior military and transportation officials have been saying for years now: that the sealift fleet is in urgent need of recapitalization if it is to be relied upon to support a large-scale operation overseas. In a crisis, nearly 90 percent of all Army and Marine Corps equipment would be carried by ship. The Navy is on the hook to pay for recapitalization, but it has so far failed to land on a strategy to do so. Overall, 40.7 percent of the 61 ships operated by Military Sealift Command and the Maritime Administration were fully ready to support a major sealift operation. Sal Mercogliano, a merchant marine and current professor at Campbell University who closely follows these issues, said the major equipment casualties are the driving factor that is dragging down readiness. “You had 22 out of the 61 ships in either C-5 or C-4 condition,” Mercogliano said. “C-5 means that you can't even leave the dock; C-4 means you can leave the dock but you are not in any condition to sail any real distance. In my ballpark, that's non-mission capable. So right off the bat you lose 22 of the 61 ships. Then of the 33 that they activated, nine of them had issues. Three of them were C-4 level. “So when you add together the ones that had issues with the ones that couldn't be activated, they're saying you can only really count on about 40 percent of the fleet to active when they are aiming for 85 percent.” Ultimately, the degraded status of the sealift fleet means that combatant commanders won't be able to count on its capacity for logistics support, Mercogliano said. “If you are Indo-Pacific Command, or you are Central Command, and you are counting on a certain amount of square footage available to you, that's going to have huge ramifications,” he added. In recent testimony, INDOPACOM Commander Adm. Phil Davidson said as much, saying his operational plans depend on logistics support. “Clearly recapitalization of our sealift system is going to be critically important, as it's aging out and really has propulsion plants that [are] expiring in capability and our ability to maintain them,” Davidson said. “It's [a] risk to our troops and all of our people that are forward in the region if there is any delay in our ability to deliver the logistics in accordance with the [operation] plans.” Manning concerns In a November interview prior to the compilation of the final report, Maritime Administrator retired Rear Adm. Mark Buzby told Defense News that the test validated the data they had on ship readiness and the Maritime Administration's ability to crew the vessels, which he has long maintained is enough for initial activation but would suffer during a prolonged effort. “I think given the scale of the test, as we've been saying, we are OK for doing initial manning for our ships when they are activated,” Buzby said. “Something that we couldn't test in this fairly short-term activation was the follow-on aspect. “We believe we have plenty of manning to man up the ships initially, get them past the sea buoy and get them on the mission. But the problem is going to manifest itself four to six months down the line when some of them want to rotate. Who is going to be standing on the pier ready to take their place? That's where we have a problem. You just couldn't show that in this activation.” One of the primary issues has been, as Davidson intimated, that many of the plants in the Ready Reserve Force are steam-operated plants, which are all but nonexistent in the commercial world, so it is increasingly difficult to find qualified engineers. Finding steam engineers went well for the turbo activation, Buzby said, but it proved difficult and will only become more so as fewer opportunities to retain updated certifications become available. In a 2018 interview with Defense News, Buzby described a shortage of personnel that would affect the sealift fleet's ability to operate for an extended period of time. The Maritime Administration, part of the Department of Transportation, estimates it has 11,768 qualified mariners with unlimited credentials available to crew the Ready Reserve Force, a number that just exceeds the needed total of 11,678 to operate both the reserve and commercial fleets at the same time. But that comes with a catch: This service is entirely voluntary. “Maritime Workforce Working Group estimates that there are sufficient mariners working in the industry to activate the surge fleet if the entire pool of qualified United States citizen mariners identified by MWWG are available and willing to sail when required,” the report read. “This assumption is of paramount importance given the voluntary nature of mariner service.” Furthermore, that number is just what it would take to activate the ships and temporarily operate them. If the nation needed to sustain a large-scale effort, it would soon begin to falter. “We are about 1,800 mariners short for any kind of long-term sustainment effort,” Buzby said. “We believe we have enough today to activate all the ships we would need to activate. ... But anything less than an all-of-nation effort ... where everyone who went out to sea, stayed at sea, we start to run short of people as we rotate.” https://www.defensenews.com/naval/2019/12/31/the-us-military-ran-the-largest-stress-test-of-its-sealift-fleet-in-years-its-in-big-trouble/

  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - September 25, 2018

    26 septembre 2018 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - September 25, 2018

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W91278-18-C-0031). Carasoft Technology Corp., Reston, Virginia, was awarded a $25,017,802 firm-fixed-price contract to migrate Army Enterprise System Integration Program Hub to Cloud along with managed services to accomplish their mission. Three bids were solicited with three bids received. Work will be performed in Reston, Virginia, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 13, 2021. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance Army funds in the amount of $24,914,298 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, is the contracting activity (W52P1J-18-F-0375). American Ordnance LLC, Middletown, Iowa, was awarded a $23,178,756 firm-fixed-price contract for Mine Clearing Line Charge systems. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work will be performed in Middletown, Iowa, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2020. Fiscal 2016 and 2018 other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $23,178,756 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, is the contracting activity (W52P1J-18-C-0057). BAE Systems Ordnance Systems Inc., Kingsport, Tennessee, was awarded a $20,285,513 modification (P00666) to contract DAAA09-98-E-0006 for sewer line repair and replacement at Holston Army Ammunition Plant. Work will be performed in Kingsport, Tennessee, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2020. Fiscal 2018 other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $20,285,513 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, is the contracting activity. HHI Corp.,* Ogden, Utah, was awarded an $18,943,387 firm-fixed-price contract to construct an ammunition inspection repair and repacking facility, ammunition storehouse, earth-covered magazines, igloo-style storage, and open storage area. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Fort Carson, Colorado, with an estimated completion date of May 31, 2020. Fiscal 2014 and 2018 military construction funds in the amount of $18,943,387 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha, Nebraska, is the contracting activity (W9128F-18-C-0037). LGC Global Inc.,* Detroit, Ohio, was awarded a $13,810,000 firm-fixed-price contract to renovate KC-135 aircraft hangar. Bids were solicited via the internet with six received. Work will be performed in Columbus, Ohio, with an estimated completion date of May 29, 2020. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance Army in the amount of $13,810,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Property and Fiscal Office, Ohio, is the contracting activity (W91364-18-C-5003). MedTrust LLC, San Antonio, Texas, was awarded a $13,500,000 firm-fixed-price contract for registered nursing services. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Jan. 31, 2019. U.S. Army Health Contracting Activity, San Antonio, Texas, is the contracting activity (W81K04-18-D-0030). Johnson Machine Works Inc.,* Chariton, Iowa, was awarded a $12,627,614 firm-fixed-price contract for supply of miter gates for Lock and Dam 5A, and Locks 8 and 10. Bids were solicited via the internet with three received. Work will be performed in Chariton, Iowa, with an estimated completion date of Oct. 27, 2023. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $12,627,614 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul, Minnesota, is the contracting activity (W912ES-18-C-0013). Gilbane Federal, Concord, California, was awarded a $12,255,392 firm-fixed-price contract for construction of automation-aided instructional building. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Fort Gordon, Georgia, with an estimated completion date of Jan. 18, 2020. Fiscal 2014 and 2018 military construction funds in the amount of $12,255,392 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah, Georgia, is the contracting activity (W912HN-18-C-3003). Day & Zimmermann Lone Star LLC, Texarkana, Texas, was awarded a $10,375,695 modification (P00011) to contract W52P1J-16-C-0001 for M67 fragmentation hand grenades. Work will be performed in Texarkana, Texas, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 31, 2021. Fiscal 2018 other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $10,375,695 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, is the contracting activity. Zyscovich Inc., Miami, Florida, was awarded a $10,000,000 fixed-price-award-fee contract for architect-engineering services. Bids were solicited via the internet with 23 received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 24, 2023. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (W91236-18-D-0013). Schenkel & Shultz Inc., Orlando, Florida, was awarded a $10,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for architect-engineering services. Bids were solicited via the internet with 23 received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 24, 2023. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (W91236-18-D-0010). Wright Contracting,* Knoxville, Tennessee (W912L7-18-D-0001); Rick Cox Construction Co.,* Harriman, Tennessee (W912L7-18-D-0002); Pangea Inc.,* St. Louis, Missouri (W912L7-18-D-0003); P&W Construction LLC,* Knoxville, Tennessee (W912L7-18-D-0004); NCS/EML JV,* Louisville, Tennessee (W912L7-18-D-0005); SAF Inc.,* Nashville, Tennessee (W912L7-18-D-0006); R.L. Alvarez Construction LLC,* Clarksville, Tennessee (W912L7-18-D-0007); Semper Tek Inc.,* Lexington, Kentucky (W912L7-18-D-0008); All Phase Solutions,* Delray Beach, Florida (W912L7-18-D-0009); Chief Electric Co.,* Memphis, Tennessee (W912L7-18-D-0010); and Howard Pence Inc.,* Elizabethtown, Kentucky (W912L7-18-D-0011), will compete for each order of the $10,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for construction projects to support the Tennessee National Guard. Bids were solicited via the internet with 14 received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 24, 2023. U.S. Property and Fiscal Office, Tennessee, is the contracting activity. Leidos Inc., Reston, Virginia, was awarded a $9,805,063 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to complete the RQ-7Bv2 integration, testing, and qualification of the design developed under Phase III of the RQ-7B Shadow Assured Positioning, Navigation, and Timing program. Three bids were solicited with two bids received. Work will be performed in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2020. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $5,272,644 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity (W911QY-18-F-0687). Lead Builders Inc.,* Thousand Oaks, California, was awarded a $7,890,000 firm-fixed-price contract for hangar repairs and upgrades. Bids were solicited via the internet with 13 received. Work will be performed in Edwards Air Force Base, California, with an estimated completion date of Oct. 31, 2019. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance Army funds in the amount of $7,890,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles, California, is the contracting activity (W912PL-18-C-0039). Cape Environmental Management Inc.,* Overland Park, Kansas, was awarded a $7,716,908 firm-fixed-price contract for perform remediation of sites at the former Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant in De Soto, Kansas. Seven bids were solicited with seven bids received. Work will be performed in De Soto, Kansas, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 6, 2022. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance Army funds in the amount of $7,716,908 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Kansas City, Missouri, is the contracting activity (W912DQ-18-F-3021). Sierra Nevada Corp., Sparks, Nevada, was awarded a $7,285,595 hybrid (cost, cost-plus-incentive-fee, and firm-fixed-price) contract for First Article Testing prototypes of a Medical Hands-Free Ultra-Wideband Broadcast device capable of meeting airworthiness. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work will be performed in Sparks, Nevada, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 25, 2023. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $3,614,043 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity (W911QY-18-C-0232). NAVY Orbis Sibro Inc., Mount Pleasant, South Carolina (N3904018D0003); Q.E.D. Systems Inc., Virginia Beach, Virginia (N3904018D0004), Delphinus Engineering, Eddystone, Pennsylvania (N3904018D0005); and Oceaneering Intl., Chesapeake, Virginia (N3904018D0006), are awarded a combined cumulative $166,961,483 cost-plus fixed fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, multiple award contracts to provide non-nuclear production support for U.S. naval submarine projects/repairs. This requirement includes touch labor efforts for 14 trades onboard Virginia and Los Angeles class submarines. The services under these contracts cover marine electrician, industrial fire watch/laborer, marine pipefitter, outside marine machinist, marine painter, weight handler, marine ship fitter, shipwright, welder, sheet metal, marine insulator, abrasive blaster, deck time setter, sound tile setter for upcoming submarine availabilities. Work will be performed in Kittery, Maine, and is expected to be completed by October 2019. If all options are exercised, work will continue through October 2023. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance (Navy) funding in the amount of $4,000 ($1,000 minimum guarantee per contract) will be obligated at time of award and expire at the end of the current fiscal year. These contracts were competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with four offers received in accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulations Part 15. The Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Kittery, Maine, is the contracting activity. Rockwell Collins Inc., Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is being awarded a $81,433,819 firm-fixed-priced, performance-based logistics requirements contract for logistics and repair support for 221 components in support of the F/A-18 A-F and E/A-18 G aircrafts as well as two additional components that are common across several aviation platforms including EA6, KC130, S3B, MH60, SH60, V-22, C2A, E2C, TE2C, P-3C, and the EP-3E aircrafts. This contract includes a four-year base period with no options. Work will be performed in College Park, Georgia (34 percent); Jacksonville, Florida (33 percent); and North Island, California (33 percent). Work is expected to be completed by September 2022. No funds will be obligated at the time of award. Working capital (Navy) funds and Australian funds under the Foreign Military Sales Program will be obligated to fund delivery orders as they are issued. Funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was a sole source pursuant to the authority set forth in 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), in accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1, with one offer received. Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity. (N00383-18-D-PV01) Goodwill Industries, Southeastern Wisconsin, Greendale, Wisconsin, is awarded an $80,004,557 firm-fixed-price contract to provide food and logistics support services for the Galley and Uniform Issue Department in support of the Recruit Training Command, Training Support Center, and other tenant activities located within the Naval Station Great Lakes. The contract will include a one-year base period and nine one-year option periods which if exercised, the total value of this contract will be $824,074,038. Work will be performed in Great Lakes, Illinois, and work is expected to be completed by September 2019. If all options are exercised, work will be completed by September 2028. Subject to the availability of funds, at time of award, funds will be incrementally funded under the contract's base period utilizing fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $3,434,398 that will expire at the end of the current fiscal year; and working capital funds (Navy) in the amount of $3,626,578 that will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This solicitation for a non-competitive requirement was pursuant to the Javits-Wagner-O'Day Act (41 U.S.C. 46-48c) and the rules of the Committee for Purchase from People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled (41 CFR Chapter 51) which implements the AbilityOne Program. Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center Norfolk, Contracting Department, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity. (N00189-18-C-Z053) Raytheon Co. Missile Systems, Tucson, Arizona, is awarded a $46,663,856 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for technical maturation and risk reduction of the Miniature Air Launched Decoy-Navy. Work will be performed in Tucson, Arizona (81 percent); East Hartford, Connecticut (4 percent); El Segundo, California (3 percent); Salt Lake City, Utah (3 percent); Papendrecht, Netherlands (3 percent); Cedar Rapids, Iowa (2 percent); Akron, Ohio (2 percent); and Indianapolis, Indiana (2 percent), and is expected to be completed in November 2020. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds (Navy) in the amount of $10,445,410 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1). The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity (N00019-18-C-0088). Omega Aerial Refueling Services, Inc.,* Alexandria, Virginia, is awarded a not-to-exceed $41,586,391 modification P00020 to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N00019-13-D-0010). This modification extends the period of performance to provide aerial refueling services to the Department of the Navy, other Department of Defense agencies, and Foreign Military Sales customers during missions ranging from basic training to multi-national exercises. Work will be performed in Riverside, California (50 percent); Brunswick, Georgia (40 percent); and various locations outside the continental U.S. (10 percent), and is expected to be completed in March 2019. No funds will be obligated at time of award. Funds will be obligated on individual orders as they are issued. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. GHD Setiadi Kaula AE JV, Honolulu, Hawaii, is awarded a maximum amount $40,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity architect-engineering (AE) contract for AE services for various base infrastructure projects and other projects primarily under the cognizance of Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Pacific area of responsibility (AOR). The work to be performed provides for AE services for base infrastructure and other civil design/engineering services. AE services include, but are not limited to, the execution and delivery of military construction project documentation; functional analysis and concept development workshops and design charrettes; design-build request for proposal solicitation documents; design-bid-build design contract documents; technical surveys and reports including concept studies, site engineering investigations, pavement condition surveys, topographical surveys, geotechnical investigations, hazardous material surveys, munitions of explosive concern surveys, hydrographic surveys, and others; construction cost estimates; collateral equipment buy packages; comprehensive interior design including structural interior design and furniture, fixtures, and equipment; and post construction award services. No task orders are being issued at this time. Work will be performed at various Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and other government facilities within the NAVFAC Pacific AOR including but not limited to Guam and the Northern Marianas Islands (70 percent); Australia (20 percent); and Hawaii (10 percent). The term of the contract is not to exceed 60 months with an expected completion date of September 2023. Fiscal 2017 military construction (MILCON), (planning and design) contract funds in the amount of $10,000 are obligated on this award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Future task orders will be primarily funded by MILCON. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with eight proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Pacific, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, is the contracting activity (N62742-18-D-0005). Vista Research, Inc.,* Arlington, Virginia, is awarded a $36,226,053 firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for a Small Business Innovation Research Phase III effort stemming from a Phase I, Phase II, and Phase III contract under Topic H-SB06.1-004, Signal Processing for a Southern Border Surveillance System. This requirement provides for up to eight Vista F50-ER1 Air Surveillance Radar (ASR) systems, including installation; and operation and sustainment support for 11 Vista F50-ER1 ASR systems, including three previously installed on ships. Work will be performed in Arlington, Virginia, and is expected to be completed in September 2023. Fiscal 2018 working capital funds (Navy) in the amount of $2,267,999 will be obligated at time of award; none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-5. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, New Jersey is the contracting activity (N68335-18-D-0046). Jacobs Technology, Inc., Tullahoma, Tennessee, is awarded a $30,637,699 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for base operations support services at Naval Station Mayport, Marine Corps Support Facility Blount Island, and outlying areas. The maximum dollar value including the base period and seven option years is $241,743,338. The work to be performed provides for base operations support services to include port operations, facility investment, custodial, pest control, integrated solid waste management, other (swimming pools), grounds maintenance and landscaping, utilities management, electrical, wastewater, steam, water, base support vehicles and equipment, and environmental. Work will be performed in Jacksonville, Florida; Naval Station Mayport (62 percent); Blount Island (37 percent); and outlying areas (1 percent), and is expected to be completed by December 2019. No funds will be obligated at time of award. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy); fiscal 2019 Navy working capital funds; fiscal 2019 Defense Health Program; fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Marine Corps); fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Marine Corps Reserve); and fiscal 2019 family housing operations and maintenance (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $25,168,579 for recurring work will be obligated on individual task orders issued during the base period. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website, with five proposals received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southeast, Jacksonville, Florida, is the contracting activity (N69450-18-D-1800). Creare LLC*, Hanover, New Hampshire, is awarded a $23,817,898 not-to-exceed, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for the procurement of up to 22 Compact Swaging Machines (CSMs) in support of the Aircraft Launch and Recovery System Recovery Program in support of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase III effort. The CSM is an advanced hydraulic system that uses up to 800 tons of pressure to swage a terminal onto an aircraft carrier purchase cable. These services are in support of SBIR Topic N06-T023 entitled “A Portable Swaging Machine for Aircraft Carrier Purchase Cable Terminals.” Work will be performed in Hanover, New Hampshire, and is expected to be completed in September 2023. Fiscal 2017 other procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $3,767,604 are being obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(5). The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, New Jersey, is the contracting activity (N68335-18-D-0067). DRS Network and Imaging Systems LLC, Melbourne, Florida, is awarded a $20,966,982 modification to previously awarded contract (N00164-12-D-JQ49) for the procurement of improved day/night observation device(s) (INOD) in support of the Marine Corps and U.S. Special Operations Command. The INOD is a cooled thermal mid-wave infrared imager with the ability to import data and export images. The system enables operators to successfully engage targets beyond 800 meters as well as see their bullet trace. Work will be performed in Melbourne, Florida (84 percent); and Dallas, Texas (16 percent), and is expected to be completed by May 2020. Fiscal 2018 procurement (Marine Corps) funding in the amount of $17,389,713; and fiscal 2018 procurement (defense-wide) funding in the amount of $2,329,338 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract modification was not competitively procured pursuant to 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1) and Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1 - only one responsible source and no other supplies or services will satisfy agency requirements. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, Indiana, is the contracting activity (N00164-12-D-JQ49). The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, is awarded $17,924,406 for modification P00001 to a cost-plus-fixed-fee delivery order (N0001918F0051) previously issued against basic ordering agreement N00019-16-G-0001. This modification is incorporation of Engineering Change Proposal (ECP) 6488, “Secondary Bleed Air Regulator and Shut Off Valve Improvement.” The intent of the ECP is to improve aircraft reliability through the procurement of recurring kits for the secondary bleed air regulator and shut off valve in support of an F/A-18E/F and EA-18G initiative committed to the elimination of physiological episodes. Work will be performed in Irvine, California, and is expected to be completed in January 2021. Fiscal 2018 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $17,924,406 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Elbit Systems of America, Fort Worth, Texas, is awarded $16,471,564 for firm-fixed-price delivery order N0001918F2390, against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00019-17-G-0014). This order procures standby flight displays to support government furnished equipment requirements for production aircraft; MV-22 Sustainment and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) production spares. Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas, and is expected to be completed in December 2021. Fiscal 2018 working capital (Navy); fiscal 2018 aircraft procurement (Navy); fiscal 2016 advanced procurement (Air Force); and FMS funds in the amount of $12,563,165 are being obligated on this award, $11,963,765 of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Ranger Land Systems Inc.,* Huntsville, Alabama, is awarded a $15,512,732 firm-fixed-price, time and materials, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract with a five-year ordering period for commercial maintenance, refurbishment, inspection and repair of Bearcats, High-Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles, Logistics Vehicle System Replacement, 7-ton trucks, Joint Light Tactical Vehicles, aircraft rescue firefighting and tactical trailers. Work will be performed in Jasper, Indiana, and is expected to be completed by September 2023. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance (Navy) funding in the amount of $671,628 will be obligated at time of award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with three offers received. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, Indiana, is the contracting activity (N00164-18-D-JV22). Nav Systems Inc., Chesapeake, Virginia (N3220518D4863); Barney A Cagle, Honolulu, Hawaii (N3220518D4864); Northrop Grumman Systems Corp. Maritime Systems, Charlottesville, Virginia (N3220518D4865); and Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Sperry Marine Division, Harvey, Louisiana (N3220518D4866), are awarded a combined cumulative ceiling $12,800,975 multiple award, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for a broad range of systems and service support for Military Sealift Command vessels' bridge electronic communication equipment, steering gear, navigation equipment, and various safety systems. Work will be performed in Original Equipment Manufacturer authorized marine service facilities, shipyards, and underway/onboard the vessels in various locations around the world. Work is expected to be completed by Sept. 29, 2021. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $3,500 per contract for a total of $14,000, will be obligated as the initial task orders and will satisfy the minimum guarantee requirements. Funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured, with proposals solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with five offers received. The U.S. Navy's Military Sealift Command, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity. Sealift Inc., Oyster Bay, New York, is awarded a $12,421,315 modification under previously awarded firm-fixed-price reimbursable contract N3220515C3201 to exercise option period four for the U.S. flagged vessel MV LTC John U. D. Page for prepositioning and transportation of cargo for the Department of the Army. The vessel is employed in worldwide trade for the transportation and prepositioning of cargo (including, but not limited to, hazardous cargo, explosives, ammunition, vehicular, containerized, and general cargo); and for military readiness, in accordance with the terms of this charter. The current contract includes a two-month firm period of the performance, four one-year option periods, and one nine-month option period. Working capital funds in the amount of $12,421,315 is currently available for performance, and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The U.S. Navy's Military Sealift Command, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity. Blue Skies Furniture LLC, Colorado Springs, Colorado, is awarded an $11,364,203 firm-fixed-price, four-year, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for branded furniture in support of Marine Corps Recruiting. This contract has a four-year ordering period with no options. Work will be performed at Colorado Springs, Colorado, and is expected to be completed Sept. 24, 2022. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance (Marine Corps) funding in the amount of $300,000, will be cited and obligated on the first delivery order and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively solicited and procured via solicitation on the Federal Business Opportunity website, with four proposals received. The Regional Contracting Office, Parris Island, South Carolina, is the contracting activity (M00263-18-D-1004). Sierra Nevada Corp., Sparks, Nevada, is awarded $10,850,638 for cost-plus-fixed-fee task order N0042118F0744 against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00421-15-G-0001). This task order provides engineering analysis and technical services to assess and investigate hardware and software trouble reports and perform corrective action in support of sustainment activities associated with the Landing System Upgrade program for Air Traffic Control and Landing Systems. Work will be performed in St. Inigoes, Maryland, and is expected to be completed in September 2020. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $844,000 will be obligated at time of award, all of which will expire at the end of the fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Sealift Inc., Oyster Bay, New York, is awarded a $9,581,250 modification to previously awarded firm-fixed-price, reimbursable contract N3220516C3501 to exercise option period three for the U.S. flagged vessel MV SSG Edward A. Carter Jr. for prepositioning and transportation of cargo for the U.S. Department of the Army. The vessel is employed in worldwide trade for the transportation and prepositioning of cargo (including, but not limited to, hazardous cargo, explosives, ammunition, vehicular, containerized, and general cargo); and for military readiness, in accordance with the terms of this charter. The current contract includes a five-month firm period of the performance, four one-year option periods and one five-month option period. If all options are exercised the value of the contract will be $71,243,437. Working capital funds in the amount of $9,581,250 are currently available for performance under this contract, and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The U.S. Navy's Military Sealift Command, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity. Deloitte Consulting LLP, Arlington, Virginia, is awarded an $8,118,024 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N00039-15-C-0037) to exercise an option for program management office support for the Program Executive Office Enterprise Information Systems' Navy Enterprise Networks Program Office. Services being acquired are programmatic, technical, engineering and integrated logistics, and application sustainment to support the naval enterprise Order to Payment System. This contract includes options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to an estimated $48,007,634. Work will be performed in Washington, District of Columbia, and is expected to be completed by September 2019. If all options are exercised, work could continue until September 2020. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $5,714,943 will be placed on contract and obligated at time of award. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This sole-source contract was not competitively procured in accordance with 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1). The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity. General Dynamics Electric Boat, Groton, Connecticut, is awarded $7,658,054 for modification P00006 to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N00030-17-C-0028) to provide various labor and material items in support of Strategic Weapons Systems Ashore, SSGN Repair, United Kingdom Dreadnought Trainer upgrades and training for Strategic Systems Programs. Work will be performed in Groton, Connecticut (44 percent); Cape Canaveral, Florida (12 percent); Kings Bay, Georgia (12 percent); Bangor, Washington (12 percent); Faslane, Scotland (12 percent); and Washington, District of Columbia (8 percent), with a completion date of April 30, 2021. Fiscal 2018 United Kingdom funds in the amount of $4,811,449; fiscal 2018 research and development test and evaluation funds in the amount of $2,771,780; and fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $74,825 are being obligated on this modification. Funds in the amounts of $74,825 will expire at the end of fiscal 2018. The Navy's Strategic Systems Programs, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. Erie Forge & Steel Inc., Erie, Pennsylvania, was awarded a not-to-exceed $7,323,320 for firm-fixed-price contract for the manufacture of propulsion shaft sections for the Virginia-class submarines. All work will be performed in Erie, Pennsylvania, and is expected to be completed by March 2020. Fiscal 2018 other procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $5,424,240 will be obligated at time of award, and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This requirement was competitively procured with the solicitation posted to the Federal Business Opportunities website, with one offer received. Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity. (Awarded Sept. 24, 2018) DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Constructicon Corp.,* Mountain View, California (SP3300-18-D-0018); Ironwood Commercial Builders, Inc.,* Pleasant Hill, California (SP3300-18-D-0019); Parshall Construction,* Concord, California (SP3300-18-D-0020); Patriot Construction, Inc.,** Stockton, California (SP3300-18-D-0021); Souza Construction, Inc.,* Farmersville, California (SP3300-18-D-0022) and Spectrum Services Group, Inc.,** Sacramento, California (SP3300-18-D-0023), are sharing a maximum $67,796,801 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract under solicitation SP3300-18-R-0002 for various construction related efforts. This was a competitive acquisition with 12 offers received. These are five-year contracts with no option periods. Location of performance is California, with a Sept. 24, 2023, performance completion date. Using customer is Defense Logistics Agency. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 through 2023 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Distribution, New Cumberland, Pennsylvania. General Electric Aviation, Vandalia, Ohio, has been awarded a $52,462,485 firm-fixed-priced delivery order (SPRPA1-18-F-KC0S) against a five-year basic ordering agreement (SPE4A1-14-G-0009) for F/A-18 aircraft generators. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. Location of performance is Ohio, with an April 1, 2024, performance completion date. Using service is Navy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 through 2024 Navy working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Facility Site Contractors Inc.,* Halethorpe, Maryland (SP3300-18-D-0012); Ritz Construction Inc.,** Monrovia, Maryland (SP3300-18-D-0013); Argus CJW JV LLC,** Norfolk, Virginia (SP3300-18-D-0014); A.P. Williams Inc.,* Harrisburg, Pennsylvania (SP3300-18-D-0015); CBLA JV LLC,** Dillsburg, Pennsylvania (SP3300-18-D-0016); and Serviam Construction LLC,*** Altoona, Pennsylvania (SP3300-18-D-0017) are sharing a $40,000,000 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract under solicitation SP3300-18-R-0003 for various construction related efforts. This was a competitive acquisition with 17 offers received. These are five-year contracts with no option periods. Location of performance is Pennsylvania, with a Sept. 24, 2023, performance completion date. Using customer is Defense Logistics Agency. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 through 2023 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Distribution, New Cumberland, Pennsylvania. Seattle Lighthouse for the Blind,***** Seattle, Washington, has been awarded a maximum $33,204,950 modification (P00006) exercising the first one-year option period of a one-year base contract (SPE1C1-17-D-B027) with three one-year option periods for multi-purpose personal hydration systems and components. This is a firm-fixed-price, indefinite-quantity contract. Location of performance is Washington, with a Sept. 30, 2019, performance completion date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 through 2019 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. North American Manufacturing,* Scranton, Pennsylvania, has been awarded a maximum $30,000,000 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for military folding cots. This was a competitive acquisition with one response received. This is a two-year base contract with three one-year option periods. Location of performance is Pennsylvania, with a Sept. 25, 2020, performance completion date. Using customers are Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and other federal civilian agencies. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 through 2020 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE8ED-18-D-0002). Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., El Segundo, California, has been awarded a maximum $22,480,020 firm-fixed price delivery order (SPRPA1-18-F-LT20) against a five-year basic ordering agreement (SPRPA1-15-G-001Z) for F/A-18 doors. This is a 37-month contract with no option periods. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. Location of performance is California, with an Oct. 31, 2021, performance completion date. Using military service is Navy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 through 2021 Navy working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Pietro Carnaghi USA Inc.,****** Pine Brook, New Jersey, has been awarded a maximum $12,305,331 firm-fixed-price contract for a Gantry Mill machine. This was a competitive acquisition and two offers received. This is an 18-month contract with no option periods. Locations of performance are Pennsylvania and Italy with a March 6, 2020, performance completion date. The using customer is Defense Logistics Agency. The type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Richmond, Virginia (SPE4A8-18-C-0003). General Electric Co., Lynn, Massachusetts, has been awarded a maximum $12,031,431 firm-fixed-price delivery order (SPRPA1-18-F-E00E) against a five-year basic ordering agreement (FA812214G0001) for aircraft engine combustion chambers. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a three-year contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Massachusetts, with a Dec. 30, 2020, performance completion date. Using military service is Navy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 through 2021 Navy working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Ritz Construction Inc.,** Monrovia, Maryland, has been awarded a maximum $7,193,360 firm-fixed-price contract for building renovations. This is a one-year plus contract with no option periods. This was a competitive acquisition with nine offers received. Location of performance is Pennsylvania, with a March 24, 2020, performance completion date. Using customer is Defense Logistics Agency. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Distribution, New Cumberland, Pennsylvania (SP3300-18-C-0022). AIR FORCE General Electric Aviation, Cincinnati, Ohio, has been awarded a $58,569,065 firm-fixed-price order (FA8122-18-F-0034) against basic ordering agreement FA8122-14-G-0001 for sustainment of the Royal Saudi Air Force F-15SA. This contract provides F110-129 engine consumables, spares, war-readiness spare kits, and support equipment. Work will be performed in Cincinnati, Ohio, and is expected to be completed by Sept. 24, 2020. This contract involves foreign military sales to Saudi Arabia and is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Non-expiring foreign military sales funds in the amount of $58,569,065 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Sustainment Center, Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, is the contracting activity (FA8122-18-F-0034). Ultra Electronics Advanced Tactical Systems Inc., Austin, Texas, has been awarded a $47,000,000 requirements-type, firm-fixed-price, cost-reimbursable contract for the Joint Air Defense Systems Integrator program. This contract provides software sustainment support services. Work will be performed in Austin, Texas, and is expected to be completed by May 30, 2023. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $3,056,675 are being obligated at the time of award on the first order. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA8574-18-D-0006). L3 Technologies Inc., Arlington, Texas, has been awarded a $8,082,879 bilateral modification (P00163) to contract FA8621-13-C-6323 for Sensor Operator Fidelity Improvements IV. Work will be performed in Arlington, Texas, and is expected to be completed by Jan. 30, 2020. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $3,950,503; fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $2,614,361; and fiscal 2018 Air National Guard funds in the amount of $1,518,015 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity. Northrup Grumman, Herndon, Virginia, has been awarded a $13,825,722 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for product data management and migration support Services. This contract provides for all labor, supplies, and technical support services necessary to operate and maintain Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, product data hardware and software; to aid government customers in managing and executing technical data generation, acceptance and sustainment activities, processes, and products within the product data environment; and to support data improvement, cleansing and migration efforts necessary to prepare data for transition into modernized and/or Air Force enterprise-level systems. Work will be performed in Robins AFB, Georgia, and is expected to be completed by Aug. 15, 2019. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $13,825,722 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Sustainment Center, Robins AFB, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA8501-18-F-0210). WASHINGTON HEADQUARTERS SERVICES Eccalon LLC, Hanover, Maryland, is being awarded an $8,448,706 firm-fixed-price contract to provide National Security Technology Accelerator Program support for the Office of Manufacturing and Industrial Base Policy. Work will be performed at the Mark Center, Virginia, with an expected completion date of Sept. 27, 2023. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $8,448,706 are being obligated at time of award. This contract was competitively procured, with three proposals received. The Washington Headquarters Services, Acquisition Directorate, Arlington, Virginia, is the contracting activity (HQ0034-18-F-0572). *Small Business **Small disadvantaged women-owned business ***Service disabled veteran-owned small business ****Small business in historically underutilized business zones *****Mandatory source ******Small disadvantaged business https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1644936/source/GovDelivery/

  • Bowen inaugure son centre de R&D aux Ulis

    13 octobre 2020 | International, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Bowen inaugure son centre de R&D aux Ulis

    PATRICK DÉSAVIE Le spécialiste des équipements complexes de radiofréquences et de télécommunications Bowen a inauguré le 8 octobre son nouveau centre de R&D aux Ulis (Essonne) où travaillent une cinquantaine de salariés. Spécialisé dans la conception et la fabrication d'équipements complexes de radiofréquence et de télécommunications, le groupe Bowen a inauguré, le 8 octobre son nouveau centre de R&D situé dans la grande zone d'activités de Courtabœuf aux Ulis (Essonne). http://Spécialisé dans la conception et la fabrication d'équipements complexes de radiofréquence et de télécommunications, le groupe Bowen a inauguré, le 8 octobre son nouveau centre de R&D situé dans la grande zone d'activités de Courtabœuf aux Ulis (Essonne) .

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