5 septembre 2019 | Local, Aérospatial

Lightning strikes twice in Ottawa

Two Lockheed Martin F-35A Lightning II fighter jets touched down at Ottawa’s Macdonald-Cartier International Airport on Sept. 4, ahead of their appearance at this weekend’s AERO Gatineau-Ottawa airshow.

The show, which runs from Sept. 6-8, will feature a flying display performed by the U.S. Air Force F-35 flight demonstration team. The fighter jets will not be on static display.

Other performers include aircraft from Vintage Wings of Canada, the Canadian CF-18 Hornet Demo team, the Canadian Forces Snowbirds aerobatic team, and more. For details, visit the show’s website.

Skies photographer Mike Luedey was waiting in Ottawa for the aircraft to arrive. Here are a few shots of the team making a (loud) entrance!

https://www.skiesmag.com/news/lightning-strikes-twice-in-ottawa

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