14 septembre 2021 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

Le budget défense atteindra près de 41 milliards d'euros en 2022

L'enveloppe budgétaire allouée à la défense en 2022 sera de nouveau en hausse pour atteindre près de 41 milliards d'euros, comme prévu par la Loi de programmation militaire (LPM), contre 39,2 milliards d'euros en 2021, a indiqué lundi la ministre des Armées, Florence Parly, lors de son discours de rentrée devant les personnels du ministère. « Depuis 2017, ce sont 26 milliards d'euros de plus qui auront été investis dans notre défense et nos armées. C'est considérable. C'est même historique. Et c'était nécessaire », a-t-elle souligné. D'une enveloppe globale de 295 milliards d'euros sur sept ans, la LPM 2019-2025 prévoit une nette hausse du budget défense après des années de déflation. Les hausses les plus importantes (+3 milliards par an) sont prévues à partir de 2023. « Il faudra continuer à se battre jusqu'au bout de cette Loi de programmation militaire qui doit nous emmener jusqu'en 2025 », a insisté Florence Parly. 

Le Figaro et Ensemble de la presse du 14 septembre 

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