22 juillet 2020 | Local, Aérospatial

L3Harris Technologies awarded $380 Million IDIQ contract for Westcam MX-Series products and support

The Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) has awarded L3Harris Technologies an eight-year, $380 million indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contract to procure Wescam MX-Series products and services in support of global U.S. Army surveillance and targeting operations.

The contract enables continued upgrades and support for the U.S. Army’s robust installed base of fixed-wing, aerostat and unmanned platforms while supporting expanding Foreign Military Sales requirements.

“L3Harris is proud to once again supply its Wescam MX technologies and solutions to the U.S. Army, as it highlights our role as a trusted global supplier of advanced imaging solutions to the defence industry,” said Sean Stackley, president, Integrated Mission Systems, L3Harris. “Through this contract, our highly specialized optics and leading technologies can continue to meet the needs of emerging mission portfolios, including time-sensitive response operations.”

L3Harris’ Wescam MX-Series products have successfully supported U.S. Army aviation programs for more than two decades. Wescam MX-Series systems have logged over four million hours of combat operations with the U.S. Army and continue to be a resource in on-going global intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions.

L3Harris’ portfolio of Wescam MX-Series systems provide high-precision situational awareness — while delivering an advanced capability to collect critical mission information that assist in overcoming emerging threats. In addition to the U.S. Army, Wescam MX systems are operational within the U.S Navy and Air Force Special Operations Command where they continue to support programs in the fight against global terrorism.

The CCC is Canada’s government-to-government contracting organization for sales of defence and security technology and expertise from Canada. Each CCC contract provides the U.S. DOD with the Government of Canada’s assurance that the contract will be fulfilled in accordance with its terms and conditions.

https://www.skiesmag.com/press-releases/l3harris-technologies-awarded-380-million-idiq-contract-for-westcam-mx-series-products-and-support

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  • Budget officer says used Australian fighter jets will cost Canada over $1 billion — far more than DND claimed

    1 mars 2019 | Local, Aérospatial

    Budget officer says used Australian fighter jets will cost Canada over $1 billion — far more than DND claimed

    DAVID PUGLIESE, OTTAWA CITIZEN The purchase of used Australian jets to boost Canada’s current fleet of fighter planes could cost taxpayers more than $1 billion, a figure 22-per-cent higher than the Department of National Defence is claiming, according to a new report from parliament’s financial watchdog. Parliamentary Budget Officer Yves Giroux examined the cost of buying and upgrading 18 used Australian F-18s and flying them to 2032. His report, released Wednesday, puts the final price tag at between $1.09 billion and $1.15 billion — considerably more than the $895.5 million estimate from DND. “We considered the entire life-cycle cost, from project management up until the very end of the disposal phase,” Giroux said in an interview with Postmedia. “We didn’t look at whether it was a good deal.” The PBO’s costing included weapons, upgrades needed for the aircraft, annual maintenance fees and the fuel that would be needed over the years of flying the aircraft. We didn’t look at whether it was a good deal The Royal Canadian Air Force is using the jets as interim fighters to boost the capability of the current fleet of CF-18s until the purchase of a new generation of aircraft. The RCAF will fly 18 of the Australian jets and use the other seven for parts and testing. The RCAF received its first two used Australian fighter jets at 4 Wing Cold Lake in Alta. on Feb. 16.  Deliveries of the jets will continue at regular intervals for the next three years, and the aircraft will be integrated into the CF-18 fleet as modifications are completed, according to the RCAF. The last aircraft are expected to arrive by the end of 2021 and fly until 2032. Giroux said his office used the same figures that DND had but did its own analysis of those cost estimates. “There’s no fundamental reason why we should come up with a different number,” he said. “My only sense is that they voluntary budgeted optimistic numbers. The reason why I don’t know for sure.” In a statement Wednesday, DND said its cost figures are close to those determined by the Parliamentary Budget Officer. The statement also added that the PBO figures for upgrades of the interim fighter fleet include estimates for CF-18 combat upgrades which the department is still trying to determine. “While we are confident that our methodology is sound, we will continue to work with the PBO, the Auditor General of Canada, and other outside entities as part of our commitment to responsible use of taxpayer dollars,” the statement noted. The Liberal government had planned to buy 18 new Super Hornet fighter jets from U.S. aerospace giant Boeing to augment the Royal Canadian Air Force’s CF-18s until new modern aircraft could be purchased in the coming years. But in 2017 Boeing complained to the U.S. Commerce Department that Canadian subsidies for Quebec-based Bombardier allowed it to sell its C-series civilian passenger aircraft in the U.S. at cut-rate prices. As a result, the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump enacted a tariff of almost 300 per cent against the Bombardier aircraft sold in the U.S. In retaliation, Canada cancelled the deal to buy the 18 Super Hornets, which would have cost more than US $5 billion. Instead of buying the new Super Hornets, the Liberals decided to acquire the used Australian jets. In November 2018 the Auditor General’s office issued a report noting that the purchase of the extra aircraft would not fix the fundamental weaknesses with the CF-18 fleet which is the aircraft’s declining combat capability and a shortage of pilots and maintenance personnel. “The Australian F/A-18s will need modifications and upgrades to allow them to fly until 2032,” the report said. “These modifications will bring the F/A-18s to the same level as the CF-18s but will not improve the CF-18’s combat capability.” “In our opinion, purchasing interim aircraft does not bring National Defence closer to consistently meeting the new operational requirement introduced in 2016,” the report added. The Canadian Forces says it is bringing in new initiatives to boost the numbers of pilots and maintenance staff. https://montrealgazette.com/news/canada/budget-officer-says-used-australian-fighter-jets-will-cost-canada-over-1-billion-far-more-than-dnd-claimed/

  • Petawawa soldiers to test new camouflage for Canadian Forces

    9 septembre 2019 | Local, Terrestre

    Petawawa soldiers to test new camouflage for Canadian Forces

    by DAVID PUGLIESE, OTTAWA CITIZEN  Some 600 soldiers at Petawawa will be involved in testing what could be the new camouflage uniform pattern for the Canadian Forces. Known as “Prototype J” the new camouflage pattern is being examined as a possible replacement for both the current arid (tan) and temperate woodland (green) camouflage. Six hundred soldiers at Petawawa will receive the new camouflage pattern uniforms but that could eventually be expanded to around 1,000 personnel. The uniforms are initially being issued to soldiers of the 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, for a series of trials and tests in the fall. “The trials will kick off in two weeks,” explained Lt. Col. Ray Corby, who is with the Army’s Director Land Requirements’ Soldiers Systems section. “We’ve put the whole battalion into the uniforms. In the next week or so they’ll be wearing them.” Various camouflage patterns were examined as part of the SOCEM (Soldier Operational Clothing and Equipment Modernization) Project but this is the first to be taken out to the field for a large-scale test. https://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/petawawa-soldiers-to-test-new-camouflage-for-canadian-forces

  • Explainer: What the Canadian military is doing for Canadians during the pandemic

    27 avril 2020 | Local, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Explainer: What the Canadian military is doing for Canadians during the pandemic

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