10 novembre 2022 | Local, Naval

Davie, troisième partenaire de la Stratégie nationale de construction navale «d’ici Noël»

Sans en dévoiler la date exacte, le ministre fédéral de la Santé et responsable de la région de Québec, Jean-Yves Duclos, a annoncé mercredi que Chantier Davie Canada sera le troisième partenaire de la Stratégie nationale de construction navale (SNCN) «d’ici Noël».

https://www.lesoleil.com/2022/11/09/davie-troisieme-partenaire-de-la-strategie-nationale-de-construction-navale-dici-noel-fdd653fd3e3ee93ee9acbaa4ce90a456

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  • Minister Sajjan Wraps Up 12th Annual Halifax International Security Forum

    23 novembre 2020 | Local, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Minister Sajjan Wraps Up 12th Annual Halifax International Security Forum

    From: National Defence Collaboration and dialogue with the international community is critical for Canada in addressing emerging security threats and ensuring the safety of all Canadians. Canada is committed to upholding the rules-based international order, both diplomatically and through our military deployments around the world, to foster a safer, more peaceful, and prosperous place. Collaboration and dialogue with the international community is critical for Canada in addressing emerging security threats and ensuring the safety of all Canadians. Canada is committed to upholding the rules-based international order, both diplomatically and through our military deployments around the world, to foster a safer, more peaceful, and prosperous place. The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National Defence, virtually co-hosted the 12th annual edition of the Halifax International Security Forum (HISF) with the President of HISF Inc., Mr. Peter Van Praagh, from November 20-22. The forum was an opportunity for defence ministers, senior officials from international organizations, representatives from academia and industry, and defence and security experts from over 51 countries to discuss current and emerging issues of global security and prosperity. During the forum, Minister Sajjan underlined the importance of Canada being strong at home, secure in North America, and engaged in the world. Minister Sajjan reaffirmed the importance of multilateralism, as allies and partners balance international commitments with critical needs at home. Discussions covered a broad range of topics including democracy, human rights, the COVID-19 pandemic, and the importance of international cooperation in facing today's challenges. Quotes “The global pandemic is having an impact on virtually everything we do, from running errands to running a country. This makes the conversations we had with our Allies and Partners at HISF this year as, if not more, important than ever before. I am confident that we will continue striking the necessary balance between critical health needs at home, supporting each other with medical supplies and expertise, and defending our sovereignty from adversaries who would do us harm. For me, this really brings home the importance of multilateralism.” The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National Defence Quick facts The Halifax International Security Forum connected more than 250 defence leaders from across the world, including senior government and military officials, policymakers, opinion leaders, academics, and members of the business community from like-minded nations. The Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces are committed to demonstrating leadership in reflecting Canadian ideals of diversity, respect and inclusion, including striving for gender equality, and building a workforce that leverages the diversity and multicultural fabric of Canadian society. https://www.canada.ca/en/department-national-defence/news/2020/11/minister-sajjan-wraps-up-12th-annual-halifax-international-security-forum.html

  • Project to buy new pistols for Canadian Forces is once again underway

    24 septembre 2020 | Local, Sécurité, Autre défense

    Project to buy new pistols for Canadian Forces is once again underway

    David Pugliese The project to purchase pistols to replace the Canadian military's Second World War-era handguns is once again underway and National Defence hopes to have the new weapons by the summer of 2022. The project had been stalled for years after small arms firms rejected in 2011 the federal government requirement that the guns be built at Colt Canada in Kitchener, Ont. In addition, the companies balked at the stipulation they had to turn over their proprietary firearms information to Colt, a firm that some saw as a competitor. But with small arms companies reluctant to bid on the Canadian pistol project, the federal government has had no choice but to drop those requirements and have an open competition. A request for bids will now be issued in early 2021, DND spokeswoman Jessica Lamirande confirmed to this newspaper. She said a “minimum of 9,000” handguns will be purchased. “These are mainly intended for the Canadian Army, and will be issued as required,” she added. The department hopes to have a contract in place by the summer of 2021, with initial deliveries by the summer of 2022, she added. The DND declined to discuss the amount of money that taxpayers will spend on the project. The new handguns will replace the Second World War-era Browning Hi-Power pistols used by the Canadian Forces. The replacement program for the 9mm Browning Hi-Power pistols has been on the books for years. In the fall of 2011, the DND abruptly cancelled plans for the purchase of 10,000 new pistols. The decision to shut the process down came after international firearms companies balked at the stipulation the firms turn over their confidential technical data to Colt Canada so the guns could be manufactured in Canada. Colt is the country's Small Arms Strategic Source and Centre of Excellence. The DND was told at the time by industry representatives that it didn't make economic sense to have Colt manufacture the guns in Canada or to have parts shipped to Colt so the guns could be assembled in Canada. The handgun replacement project has been seen as an example of a highly dysfunctional military procurement system. At one point the DND tried to prevent small arms companies from talking to journalists about the bungled procurement but the department's decree was largely ignored. Under the Munitions Supply Program sole source deals have been directed to Colt Canada to maintain a small arms expertise in the country. In late January Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan announced the purchase of more than 3,600 new C6AI FLEX General Purpose Machine Guns from the company. The $96-million order was a follow-on deal to the 2017 contract for 1,148 of the same machine guns. Some spare parts are included along with cleaning kits and carrying slings in the purchase. Critics pointed out that the cost of each gun worked out to around $27,000, at least twice the amount that other militaries are spending. In February and April two other contracts were directed to Colt to produce a semi-automatic rifle in 7.62 calibre to be used by Canadian Forces sniper teams as an auxiliary weapon. Lamirande said in 2018 changes were made to improve the Munitions Supply Program. Under those changes, new business was no longer automatically given to members of the supply program. Instead a thorough analysis is to be done to decide whether it is better to open a project up to competition or sole source the deal to firms in the Munitions Supply Program. “Factors that are considered include performance, value for money, flexibility, innovation potential, and socio-economic benefits,” Lamirande explained. “We also include considerations for current availability within timeframes and the long term sustainability of the solution.” https://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/project-to-buy-new-pistols-for-canadian-forces-is-once-again-underway

  • Davie Shipyard Begins Halifax-Class Frigate Mid-Life Refit Program

    17 août 2020 | Local, Naval

    Davie Shipyard Begins Halifax-Class Frigate Mid-Life Refit Program

    Quebec-based shipbuilder Davie Shipyard welcomed on 11 August the Royal Canadian Navy Halifax-class frigate HMCS St. John for major refit and upgrade. The event marks the start of a long-term naval maintenance and upgrade program that will keep the Halifax-class frigates operational until the arrival of the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) in the 2040s. According to the shipyard, the event was a key milestone in Davie's near 200-year history marking the return of Canada's primary surface combat ships to Québec. Three of the 12 frigate fleet were built at Davie in the 1990s (HMCS Ville de Quebec, HMCS Regina and HMCS Calgary). The $500 million performance-based contract to carry out an extensive mid-life refit on the Royal Canadian Navy's patrol frigates is for an initial five-year period. It is expected to increase in duration and value as new work packages are added. Davie Shipyard, alongside Seaspan Victoria Shipyards in British Columbia and Irving Shipyards in Nova Scotia are all participating in the $1.5-billion maintenance and upgrade program. Over the past 12 months a major facility upgrade program was completed at the West end of Davie shipyard and in the historic Lorne drydock to provide a long-term maintenance home for Canada's surface combat fleet and its supporting naval staff. Davie Shipyard added in a statement that docking maintenance work periods are critical to ensure the RCN has at least 8 of its 12 patrol frigates ready for deployment at all times until the class is replaced by the Canadian Surface Combatants (CSC) in the early 2040s. According to Timothy Choi, naval analyst at the University of Calgary in Canada, the mid-life refit work will focus on the hull, mechanical, and electrical works that were not included as part of the FELEX upgrades. “The only substantial new component that I'm aware of are the four .50cal remote weapons system” Choi added. Raytheon Canada Limited was awarded in March 2016 a contract to install up to 58 Naval Remote Weapon Stations (NRWS) on Royal Canadian Navy surface vessels. The NRWS are .50 cal Mini typhoon RWS by Israeli company Rafael, modified and adapted by Raytheon. About Halifax-class Frigates HMCS Regina sailing past the Greater Victoria Shoreline en route to Hawaii. Photo credit: MS Dan Bard The 12 Canadian-built Halifax-class multi-role patrol frigates are considered the backbone of the Royal Canadian Navy. They can deploy anywhere in the world in support of the Government of Canada. Under the Halifax-class Modernization / Frigate Life Extension project, the frigates received a number of upgrades to ensure they have the capabilities to meet the new threats and changing operating environments of today. Enhanced capabilities include: new Combat Management System (CMS 330) 57mm Mk3 naval gun system MASS decoy launchers new Integrated Platform Management System CH-148 Cyclone helicopter capability Advanced Harpoon Weapon Control System new ESM Smart-S Mk2 radar CEROS 200 fire control radar The first modernized Halifax-class frigates were delivered in late 2014, and the last ship in 2018. Halifax-class specifications Length: 134 metres Beam: 16 metres Complement: 225 personnel https://www.navalnews.com/naval-news/2020/08/davie-shipyard-begins-halifax-class-frigate-mid-life-refit-program/

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