6 avril 2021 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

Contracts for April 1, 2021

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  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - February 03, 2020

    4 février 2020 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - February 03, 2020

    AIR FORCE The following eight firm-fixed price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, multiple award task order contracts (MATOC) -- each with a not to exceed price of $90,000,000 -- have been awarded to the following: Doyon Management Services, Federal Way, Washington (FA4626-20-D-0010); Geranios Enterprises Inc., Great Falls, Montana (FA4626-20-D-0011); Guy Tabacco Construction Co., Black Eagle, Montana (FA4626-20-D-0012); James Talcott Construction, Great Falls, Montana (FA4626-20-D-0013); JE Hurley Inc., Colorado Springs, Colorado (FA4626-20-D-0014); NorthCon Inc., Hayden, Idaho (FA4626-20-D-0015); Sealaska Construction Solutions LLC., Seattle, Washington (FA4626-20-D-0016); and Wadsworth Builders Co. Inc., Great Falls, Montana (FA4626-20-D-0017). This MATOC contract is a design-build, bid-build construction acquisition based on a general statement of work further defined with each individual task order. Work to be performed under the MATOC will be the general construction category, to include maintenance, repair, alteration, mechanical, electrical, heating/air conditioning, demolition, painting and earthwork. Work will be performed at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana, and is to be completed as specified in each individual task order by Feb. 2, 2027. This award is the result of a competitive solicitation to total small businesses, 8(a) small business, and HUBZone small businesses; 16 offers were received. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $4,000 ($500 each) are being obligated at the time of award. The 341st Contracting Squadron, Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana, is the contracting activity. Rolls-Royce Corp., Indianapolis, Indiana, has been awarded a $57,360,519 delivery order modification (FA8504-20-F-0007-P00002) to previously awarded contract FA8504-17-D-0002 for C-130J propulsion long term sustainment. This order provides funding for Option Three and Power By The Hour flying hours. The work is expected to be completed Feb. 1, 2021. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $57,360,519 are being obligated at the time of award. The total cumulative face value of the contract is $57,360,519. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity. Merrill Corp., Clearfield, Utah, has been awarded a firm-fixed price requirement type contract in the amount of $21,477,000 for the overhaul of duct assembly. Work will be performed in Clearfield, Utah, and is expected to be complete by Feb. 2, 2025. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2020-2025 procurement funds will be used. The base award is estimated at $4,020,084; Option One is $4,000,467; Option Two is $4,346,985; Option Three is $4,641,164; and Option Four is $4,468,298. Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, is the contracting activity (FA8119-20-D-0001). The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, has been awarded a firm-fixed-price requirement type contract in the amount of $7,907,471 for the repair of KC-135 cowling and fan ducts. Work will be performed in St. Louis, Missouri, and is expected to be complete by Feb. 2, 2025. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2020-2025 procurement funds will be used. The base award (three year amount) is estimated at $4,941,509. Option One is $1,444,206; Option Two is $1,521,756. Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, is the contracting activity (FA8119-20-D-0002). NAVY Manson Construction Co., Seattle, Washington, is awarded an $89,370,000 firm-fixed-price contract that provides for design-bid-build services for the construction of Seawolf Class Service Pier Extension, Naval Base Kitsap Bangor. The total cumulative face value of the contract including the award of four options will be $89,370,000. This contract award does not involve foreign military sales. The work to be performed provides for the construction of a 520 foot by 68-foot single level, reinforced concrete, general-purpose submarine berthing pier extension to the existing pier, with pier-side utilities, communication systems and two-580-square-foot concrete floating camels. The pier extension includes engineered pile and caps to support the pier deck, a fixed crane, equipment pads, mobile cranes and utility buildings. The project also configures and adds to the existing wave screen attenuation system and modifies the existing small craft berthing at the service pier. Additionally, the project constructs a low-rise compressor building on the pier for new tool air compressors and breathing air compressors and alters an existing building to accommodate new and existing lift stations, sewage equipment, storm drainage, industrial wastewater services and provides a new emergency generator. Work will be performed in Silverdale, Washington, and is expected to be completed by July 2022. The solicitation was competitively procured via Federal Business Opportunities with five offers received. Fiscal 2020 military construction funds for $89,370,000 are obligated on this award. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Northwest, Silverdale, Washington, is the contracting activity (N44255-20-C-2002). Rockwell Collins Simulation and Training Solutions, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, was awarded a $20,337,451 modification (P00016) to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N61340-17-C-0014). This modification procures updates to the Delta Software System Configuration #3 software baseline to include the visual system and cyber security on tactics and flight trainer devices. Additionally, this modification provides technology refresh and aircraft concurrency updates on tactics devices, aircraft concurrency and aerial refueling updates on the flight devices, tactics and flight device training and associated technical data in support of the E-2D Hawkeye Integrated Training System. Work will be performed in Point Mugu, California, and is expected to be completed in June 2022. Fiscal 2018 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $2,016,274; fiscal 2019 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $13,061,234; and fiscal 2020 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $5,259,943 will be obligated at time of award, $2,016,274 of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Training Systems Division, Orlando, Florida, is the contracting activity. (Awarded Jan. 31, 2020) Raytheon Co., Integrated Defense Systems, Marlborough, Massachusetts, is awarded a $9,107,841 cost-plus-fixed-fee undefinitized contract action under a previously awarded basic ordering agreement N00024-19-G-5107 to repair and test the USS Sampson (DDG 102) SPY-1D(V) transmitter suite. This order covers repair, refurbishment, reassembly and testing of the AEGIS Weapon System (AWS) AN/SPY-1D(V) Transmitter Group in support of USS Sampson (DDG 102) as well as associated testing support. Work will be performed in Andover, Massachusetts (65%); Keyport, Washington (16%); Moorestown, New Jersey (10%); and Marlborough, Massachusetts (9%), and is expected to be completed by September 2021. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance (Navy) funding for $4,108,940 will be obligated at the time of award and expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This order was not competitively procured in accordance with 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1) (only one responsible source and no other supplies or services will satisfy agency requirements). The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity (N00024-20-F-5105). Zenetex LLC, Herndon, Virginia, was awarded a $7,521,702 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to provide contractor support services (CSS) to temporarily augment government personnel to assist in the acquisition, management and sustainment of Navy training systems. CSS support includes corporate operations, research and technology, program management, logistics, engineering, instructional systems and test and evaluation support services for various training systems managed by the Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division. Work will be performed in Orlando, Florida, and is expected to be completed in May 2020. Fiscal 2019 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $432,783; fiscal 2019 other procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $138,112; fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funds in the amount of $278,344; fiscal 2020 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $1,002,318; fiscal 2020 other procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $357,920; fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $507,119; fiscal 2020 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funds in the amount of $101,022; working capital (Navy) funds in the amount of $1,204,302; and Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $520,643 will be obligated at time of award, $785,463 of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. The Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division, Orlando, Florida, is the contracting activity (N61340-20-C-0009). (Awarded Jan. 31, 2020) ARMY H2 Direct LLC,* Gulf Breeze, Florida, was awarded a $39,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for personnel, equipment, supplies, facilities, transportation, tools, materials, supervision and other items and non-personal services necessary to provide information technology management support services. Bids were solicited via the internet with eight received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Feb. 28, 2025. The 418th Contracting Support Brigade, Fort Hood, Texas, is the contracting activity (W91151-20-D-0009). Cray Inc., Seattle, Washington, was awarded a $26,480,000 firm-fixed-price contract for Department of Defense high performance computing modernization. Bids were solicited via the internet with three received. Work will be performed in Stennis Space Center, Mississippi, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 1, 2025. Fiscal 2020 other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $26,480,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntsville, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W912DY-20-F-0126). Sustainable System Solutions LLC,* Herndon, Virginia, was awarded a $9,563,615 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to provide the design, development, integration, testing and fielding of test capabilities systems and/or related test infrastructure among ranges within the Department of Defense test and evaluation community. Bids were solicited via the internet with four received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Feb. 2, 2030. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Orlando, Florida, is the contracting activity (W900KK-20-D-0003). Escal Institute Advanced Tech, North Bethesda, Maryland, was awarded an $8,805,373 firm-fixed-price contract to provide training and certifications to verify and validate student proficiency in cybersecurity roles. Bids were solicited via the internet with four received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Feb. 2, 2021. Fort Gordon, Georgia, is the contracting activity (W911S0-20-F-0111). U.S. SPECIAL OPERATIONS COMMAND The Boeing Co., Ridley Park, Pennsylvania, was awarded an $18,186,000 firm-fixed-price type delivery order (H92241-20-F-0020) under basic ordering agreement W91215-16-G-0001 to procure the long lead components and parts in support of MH-47G rotary wing aircraft. This action is required to satisfy an urgent need to sustain U.S. Special Operations Forces (SOF) heavy assault, rotary wing aircraft and to mitigate the impact of the MH-47G aircraft availability in light of increased SOF operational demands. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Fiscal 2020 aircraft procurement, Army funds in the amount of $18,186,000 were obligated at the time of award. The majority of the work will be performed in Ridley Park. U.S. Special Operations Command, Tampa, Florida, is the contracting activity. *Small business https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Contracts/Contract/Article/2073298/source/GovDelivery/

  • Air Force study on future aerial refueling tanker could start in 2022

    5 février 2021 | International, Aérospatial

    Air Force study on future aerial refueling tanker could start in 2022

    By: Valerie Insinna  WASHINGTON — The Air Force could begin to lay out its vision for a future aerial refueling tanker, previously known as KC-Z, as early as next year, the head of Air Mobility Command said Monday. The service intends to conduct an analysis of alternatives for an advanced aerial refueling aircraft in fiscal year 2022, AMC commander Gen. Jacqueline Van Ovost said during a Defense Writers Group meeting with reporters. That study will help the Air Force determine precisely which capabilities a future tanker will need to to operate in more heavily contested battlefields against the threats posed by nations such as Russia and China. “We’re thinking about the near peer [competition], and what we need for a near peer [competition],” she said. Key to that discussion is figuring out how much of the aerial refueling process can be performed without a human pilot or boom operator onboard the plane to fly it or give other aircraft gas. “Is going to be autonomous? Is it going to be pilot on the loop [or] pilot in the loop capability?” asked Van Ovost. “Is it going to be small? Is it going to be large? What kind of [self protection] is it going to have? What kind of electromagnetic spectrum capabilities is it going to have to both protect itself and enhance the lethality of the Joint Force while it’s out there?” In April, Will Roper, then the Air Force’s top acquisition official, told reporters that an agreement with Boeing for a new and improved KC-46 vision system could pave the way for autonomous aerial refueling. The addition of 4K high-definition cameras, modern processors and LiDAR (light detecting and ranging) sensors would help the new system accumulate much of the data necessary for a computer to correctly calculate all the variables that need to be solved for safe aerial refueling. “All you have to do is take that data that tells the world inside the jet the reality of geometries between the airplane and the boom outside the jet. Once you have that, you simply need to translate it into algorithms that allow the tanker to tank itself,” Roper said then. The Air Force is not the only service interested in automated aerial refueling. The Navy is flight testing the MQ-25 Stingray aerial refueling drone — which, like the Air Force’s new KC-46 tanker, is built by Boeing. The Navy eventually hopes to operate the MQ-25 onboard aircraft carriers, where it will be used to extend the range of fighter jets like the F-35C and F/A-18EF Super Hornet. Van Ovost acknowledged the Air Force is still years away from being able to hold a competition for the platform formerly known as KC-Z. After the Air Force completes its procurement of 179 KC-46s — which, if its current buy rate holds, will occur around the 2027 timeframe — the service will buy a non-developmental “bridge tanker,” she said. That effort, which replaces the KC-Y program, will likely be a battle between Boeing and an Airbus-Lockheed Martin team, which joined forces in 2018 to market Airbus’ A330 Multi-Role Tanker Transport to the U.S. Air Force. Both teams are expected to offer upgraded versions of their current aerial refueling aircraft. Van Ovost did not say when that competition will begin. Along with tackling questions about its future tanker, the Air Force is also set to begin a business case analysis whether to pursue contracted aerial refueling to support U.S. military training and test activities across the contiguous United States. After holding a December 2019 industry day with interested vendors, Air Mobility Command conducted a study into the feasibility and affordability of commercial air refueling services and submitted a proposal to Air Force leadership. However, Air Force leaders want more information before making a final decision, and have asked for a comprehensive business case analysis that would finalize a requirement for all of the services’ needs, Van Ovost said. The study would come up with options for various contracting models — which could include tankers that are leased to the government or contractor-owned and operated — as well as hammer out details on Federal Aviation Administration certification requirements. “We’re working with headquarters Air Force to finalize the parameters for the study, and then likely will be contracting out that study,” Van Ovost said. “And for expectation’s sake, it does take a while. These kinds of business case analysis we have seen take 18 months, so we are going to put pen to paper and take a very close look at it.” https://www.defensenews.com/air/2021/02/02/air-force-study-on-future-aerial-refueling-tanker-could-start-in-2022

  • On the new battlefield, the Navy has to get software updates to the fleet within days, acquisition boss says

    26 septembre 2018 | International, Naval, C4ISR

    On the new battlefield, the Navy has to get software updates to the fleet within days, acquisition boss says

    By: David B. Larter The Navy has to get software updates and patches to the fleet within days if it’s going to win in the future, the Department of the Navy’s acquisition boss said Sept. 25 at Modern Day Marine. James Geurts, assistant secretary of the Navy for research, acquisition and development, said the fleet has been working on the rapid development of software to get needed upgrades to the ships ahead of pier-side availabilities, a pace he said was too slow for the modern battlefield. “We recently did one of our proof-of-principles to say: ‘How do you take ... software, get it system certified, get it cyber certified then get it out over the airwaves, uploaded on to a ship and into the combat system in 24 hours,” Geurts said. “My view is unless we get to the point where I can identify a software requirement, whether it’s an [artificial intelligence] algorithm or something, find the solution, get it checked out on the network, give it whatever cyber-proofing it needs and get it into the fight in less than a week, we are not going to be successful in the long run.” The Navy has increasingly found that its current systems are capable of adjusting to new threats through software upgrades rather than buying new systems and installing them, a time-consuming and cripplingly expensive process that has been the norm in years past. Geurts said the Navy had to have a software architecture that was amenable to rapid upgrades so that developers would not need to re-test the underlying architecture each time a patch or fix is uploaded. Furthermore, the service also has to develop cyber security standards that don't just weigh whether or not something can be compromised but begin to think of it more in terms of risks associated. “The answer isn't yes or no, it’s ‘Commander here is your risk.’ And then weigh the risk of doing that [upgrade] versus a potential cyber impact so that commanders can make reasonable command decisions. Because there is always a risk to not doing something. We often talk about the risk of doing something, we don't often talk about the risk of not doing it.” Geurts told a gaggle with reporters after the talk that he was not talking about uploading whole new programs that sailors might be unfamiliar with but more iterative upgrades. "Don't take that to an extreme to where we will load on something that nobody has ever seen before, but it could be that there is a particular issue or new need, and you can envision us testing and training that shore-side, making sure it’s right – we don't want to wait for the ship to come home we could potentially blast that out [to the fleet.]" The Navy is also working more with having digital doppelgangers of its combat system on board its ships so that new technologies can be tested by the crew and commanders before its uploaded into the main combat system, a hedge against reaping unintended consequences by uploading a feature or patch without knowing exactly how it will fit into the ship’s systems. "The other thing we are doing a lot with is digital twins, where [the ship] might have the combat system that it’s fighting with as well as a digital twin,” Geurts explained. “So you might be able to upload that new feature in the digital twin so you could have both, then it’s up to the commander whether it’s something you adopt or not.” https://www.c4isrnet.com/digital-show-dailies/modern-day-marine/2018/09/25/on-the-new-battlefield-the-navy-has-to-get-software-updates-to-the-fleet-within-days-acquisition-boss-says

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