3 février 2022 | Local, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

CANSEC 2022: We're back - Registration opens March 21

CANSEC 2022

 

CANSEC - We're back

Let’s grow our industry and celebrate Canadian capabilities worldwide together!​

Link to video: youtu.be/zV48DSoYays 

Registration opens - myCANSEC

Link to website: bit.ly/aboutcansec

How will you participate at CANSEC 2022?
Why exhibit at CANSEC 2022? Why sponsor at CANSEC 2022? Why attend CANSEC 2022?

 

* You may access myCANSEC through your myCADSI account. Once logged in, click on the ‘myCANSEC’ tab in the upper right corner of the myCADSI Newsfeed page.
Link to myCADSI: defenceandsecurity.ca/myCADSI/welcome
Link to myCANSEC: defenceandsecurity.ca/myCANSEC/home

Attendance at all CANSEC events is restricted to CADSI members and government (federal, provincial, municipal, foreign) personnel only. For more information on becoming a member please refer to the membership section on the CADSI website.

CADSI intends to produce CANSEC live and in-person on June 1 and 2, 2022, following all public health & safety guidelines and protocols as required at the time of the event. Please continue to follow this e-newsletter, our website, and CADSI’s Twitter account (@CADSICanada) for further details regarding health & safety protocols that will be implemented at CANSEC 2022.

CADSI/CANSEC has become aware of emails and phone calls coming from a third party reporting to offer discounted hotel rates. Please be aware these are fraudulent. These emails and phone calls are not issued from CADSI or on behalf of our Organization. Anyone who receives communications claiming to be from CADSI/CANSEC and suspects it to be fraudulent or a scam should simply ignore it. CADSI does not use a housing bureau or third-party agency for hotel accommodations or any other travel arrangements.

Please note that this notice is being sent to those that have subscribed to this e-newsletter with CADSI. We encourage you to distribute this e-newsletter to anyone else in your organization who may find this of interest.


CANSEC

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Sur le même sujet

  • For Canada, multibillion-dollar training program is the FAcT of the matter

    10 novembre 2020 | Local, Aérospatial, C4ISR

    For Canada, multibillion-dollar training program is the FAcT of the matter

    By: David Pugliese  VICTORIA, British Columbia — The Royal Canadian Air Force plans to combine two training programs under a single, multibillion-dollar project, a move that will lead to incumbent contractors CAE and a consortium led by KF Aerospace facing off against a series of large firms. The government plans to issue a call for bids from defense companies next year for the Future Aircrew Training program, or FAcT. A draft bid package is expected to be released by the end of the year so prequalified firms can provide feedback to the Canadian Armed Forces. The contract is estimated to be worth at least CA$5 billion (U.S. $3.75 billion) and will provide training for Air Force pilots and crew for 20 years. Canada plans to award the contract in 2023. The government has already approved a list of firms that will be authorized to bid on FAcT, including Babcock Canada, Leonardo Canada, Lockheed Martin Canada and SkyAlyne Canada. SkyAlyne is a partnership between major Canadian defense firms CAE and KF Aerospace. Those two companies currently provide the two main aircrew training programs to the Air Force. Under FAcT, the number of pilots trained annually will slightly increase. The pilot production numbers for FAcT are expected to range from about 105 to a maximum of 120. In addition, air combat systems officers and airborne electronic sensor operators will also be trained under the program. Currently, that training is done in-house by the service. “We’re very focused on getting this to contract,” Air Force Col. Pete Saunders, director of air simulation and training, said of FAcT. “In the end, the foundation of the Air Force is our ability to generate qualified aviators. That is what FAcT is all about.” Consolidation FAcT will combine two existing training programs. The first, NATO Flying Training in Canada, is provided by CAE’s military aviation training division, which operates out of Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan. The program offers undergraduate and postgraduate pilot training in military-controlled airspace using training aircraft with advanced glass cockpits. That contact ends in 2023. The second program is the Contracted Flying Training and Support, which is run by a KF Aerospace-led consortium. Training is conducted out of the Southport Aerospace Centre near Portage la Prairie, Manitoba. The program “oversees the flying training and support services contract for the Primary and Basic Flying Training, Multi-Engine and Helicopter pilot training programs,” according to the government. That contract ends in 2027. Training for Royal Canadian Air Force pilots involves various fixed-wing aircraft — including the Grob 120A, CT-156 Harvard II, CT-155 Hawk and King Air C90 — as well as Bell 206 and 412 helicopters. Air combat systems officers and airborne electronic sensor operators are trained on CT-142 Dash-8 planes. Simulation is also extensively used in aircrew training. Saunders said the Air Force is being as flexible as possible to allow industry competitors to come up with what they believe will be the best solution for the service’s training needs. “The way we’re approaching this is that it is up to them to determine what training aids are required,” he explained. “They will determine what is the appropriate mix of simulation and live fly. They will look at the number and type of aircraft they require in order to meet their training solution.” However, officials are leaving no room for flexibility in the training’s outcome. “What we are being prescriptive about is the standard that a graduate has to achieve,” Saunders said. The service has cooperated with the qualified bidders, consulting with them on components of what will be in the FAcT bid package — essentially the request for proposals. Saunders said he hopes to release the RFP by mid-2021. Apart from providing training and maintenance, the winning bidder must revitalize the aging training infrastructure, he added. The Air Force expects the construction of a new training center for air combat systems officers and airborne electronic sensor operators, as the current facility in Winnipeg, Manitoba, is quite old. Other new infrastructure, such as hangars, will also likely be built. Officials are requiring the winning supplier to invest in Canada equal to the value of the contract, but the government is also focused on a winning bid that emphasizes domestic firms playing a major role in training, simulation and in-service support. The government also has an ongoing competition for the acquisition of a new fighter jet to replace the Air Force’s fleet of CF-18 aircraft. Canada isn’t expected to announce the winning bid until at least 2022, with deliveries of aircraft scheduled for 2025. But Saunders said training for that future aircraft will be separate from FAcT, as the requirements are set by a different Air Force program office. https://www.defensenews.com/training-sim/2020/11/09/for-canada-multibillion-dollar-training-program-is-the-fact-of-the-matter/

  • CANADIAN UAVS SECURES NATION-WIDE BVLOS PERMIT FOR FLIGHT OPERATIONS
  • Flying up North

    15 août 2018 | Local, Aérospatial

    Flying up North

    By Second Lieutenant Kathleen Soucy The challenges of operating an aircraft in the North are numerous. “The first challenge is, without a doubt, weather,” says Capt Colin Wilkins, a CC-130J Hercules pilot with 436 Transport Squadron, during a planned flight to Canadian Forces Station (CFS) Alert. “Weather can be very unpredictable up North–and change rapidly.” In order to mitigate risks associated with extreme weather conditions, the aircrew follows a “plan procedure for cold weather operations,” said Cpl Yassabi Siwakoti, an aviation technician. This even includes a special procedure to start and shut down the aircraft when it is extremely cold, involving the removal and storage of batteries inside the aircraft. Located 1,834 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle, just 817 kilometres from the North Pole, Canadian Forces Station (CFS) Alert is the most northerly permanently inhabited location in the world. Full Article: https://www.skiesmag.com/news/flying-up-north/

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