7 décembre 2018 | International, Aérospatial, C4ISR

Brexit : le Royaume-Uni n'utilisera pas Galileo pour la défense ou des infrastructures critiques

C'est l'un des dossiers « chauds » de la séparation entre l'Union européenne et les Anglais. Le gouvernement explique qu'il « explorera des pistes pour construire son propre système mondial de navigation par satellite, capable de guider les drones militaires, de gérer les réseaux d'énergie et de fournir des services essentiels aux smartphones ».

« Compte tenu de la décision de la Commission d'interdire au Royaume-Uni de participer pleinement au développement de Galileo sous tous ses aspects, il est normal que nous trouvions des alternatives [...] Je ne peux pas laisser nos services armés s'appuyer sur un système dont nous ne pouvons être sûrs. Ce ne serait pas dans notre intérêt national », affirme la Première ministre Theresa May.

« Et en tant qu'acteur mondial avec des ingénieurs de classe mondiale et des alliés indéfectibles dans le monde entier, nous ne sommes pas à court d'options », ajoute-t-elle, cherchant à rassurer.

Les réactions n'ont pas tardé. Sam Gyimah, ministre des Sciences et des Universités, a annoncé sur sa page Facebook sa démission vendredi dernier. « Je ne peux soutenir l'accord du gouvernement tel qu'il est ».

« Ce qui s'est passé avec Galileo est un avant-goût des négociations brutales que nous aurons à mener » ajoute-t-il, comme le rapporte l'AFP. Le Royaume-Uni aurait investi 1,4 milliard d'euros dans le système de positionnement par satellites européen : « nous ne récupérerons pas cet argent » affirme Sam Gyimah.

https://www.nextinpact.com/brief/brexit---le-royaume-uni-n-utilisera-pas-galileo-pour-la-defense-ou-des-infrastructures-critiques-6839.htm

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