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  • Is near-instant satellite imagery almost here?

    December 7, 2018 | International, C4ISR

    Is near-instant satellite imagery almost here?

    By: Mike Gruss Intelligence analysts and soldiers on the battlefield could have access to near real-time imagery from commercial satellites as soon as 2021 thanks to new industry partnerships. Amazon Web Services unveiled Nov. 28 a new product named AWS Ground Station, which includes parabolic antennas at 12 locations across the globe. Those ground stations can download imagery data as satellites pass overhead and then push that information to the cloud at faster speeds than traditional ground stations. Meanwhile, leaders from satellite imagery company DigitalGlobe said in tests they were able to move imagery data from the ground station to the cloud in less than a minute. Using today's technology, that task takes about an hour. Combined, the speed of the new ground stations and the expected launch of DigitalGlobe's constellation of next-generation imagery satellites in 2021 would offer a new level of immediacy to customers. “When firefighters are attacking a wildfire, they need the most up-to-date information to save lives and homes,” Jeff Carr, director of mission operations engineering support at DigitalGlobe, wrote in a Nov. 27 blog post. “When first responders are tracking down refugees fleeing danger in flimsy rubber boats, they need real-time information about where those rubber boats are located before they sink. The uses for current and accurate space-based data is growing — and the end-users need it quickly.” DigitalGlobe provides imagery to the National Reconnaissance Office under the Enhanced View contract and to the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency with the Global EGD contract. Several companies that already provide imagery and data to the Department of Defense and intelligence community — including BlackSky, Spire and HawkEye 360 — are also using the ground stations. Traditionally, ground stations download information from satellites on a rigid schedule, meaning users must wait several hours until the next pass when new information is available and can be processed. The company's new Legion satellites will double the number of times the satellites contact ground stations. In addition, an imagery satellite could revisit the same target as many as 15 times a day. All of that means defense and intelligence agencies could have access to imagery that is a few minutes old, not several hours old. Turner Brinton, a DigitalGlobe spokesman, declined to comment on the technical aspects of how the company would support the U.S. government. “Satellite data is incredibly useful for building a wide range of important applications, but it is super complex and expensive to build and operate the infrastructure needed to do so,” Charlie Bell, senior vice president of AWS, said in a press release. “Today, we are giving satellite customers the ability to dynamically scale their ground station antenna use based on actual need. And, they will be able to ingest data straight into AWS, where they can securely store, analyze and transmit products to their customers without needing to worry about building all of the infrastructure themselves.” In addition, Lockheed Martin and Amazon Web Services announced a new partnership Nov. 27 that would allow customers to download satellite data faster, more often and from multiple satellites at the same time. That technology is a shoebox-sized antenna and satellite receiver known as Verge. Each antenna would cost about $20,000 and replace larger parabolic antennas, which are often priced at more than $1 million. While Pentagon officials have worried that larger ground stations for military satellite could make easy targets, the relatively small size of Verge could be an attractive feature to defense officials focused on resiliency. It's unlikely the Defense Department would rely on the new technology for its satellite downlinks, but Lockheed Martin leaders said they could envision the military would use the ground stations for experimental satellites, particularly those in low-Earth orbit. Or the technology could be used to create a backup ground station for some of the Pentagon's more sophisticated satellites. Already, Lockheed Martin has tested a network of 10 S-band antennas in the Denver area that downlinked from a small satellite from the Air Force Research Laboratory, said Rick Ambrose, Lockheed Martin's executive vice president for space. In addition, the company has also downlinked data from another, unspecified government satellite and sent that data to the agency's cloud. https://www.c4isrnet.com/intel-geoint/2018/12/03/is-near-instant-satellite-imagery-in-the-near-future

  • Germany Develops Offensive Cyber Capabilities Without A Coherent Strategy of What to Do With Them

    December 7, 2018 | International, C4ISR

    Germany Develops Offensive Cyber Capabilities Without A Coherent Strategy of What to Do With Them

    BY MATTHIAS SCHULZE Germany has traditionally prioritized defense over offense in cyberspace. That's now beginning to change. There is a reoccurring debate in German national security and foreign policy whether Germany suffers from “Strategieunfähigkeit”—an inability to develop and implement strategy. The historic trauma of two lost World Wars created a pacifist culture that always struggled with formulating national security interests and defining strategy. The so-called “culture of reluctance” regarding the use of hard power has bled into Berlin's thinking about cyber issues, especially as it rushes to develop capabilities without an overarching strategy on how to use them. Until recently, Germany has prioritized defense over offense in cyberspace. The Federal Office for Information Security (BSI), Germany's cybersecurity agency, has a strictly non-military defensive mandate and is a vigilant advocate of strong encryption and full disclosure of zero-day vulnerabilities to vendors. Germany's foreign intelligence agency (BND) has historically had a relatively small cyber espionage budget. Germany's defensive posture began to shift in 2015, after the internal network of the German Bundestag was successfully compromised by Russian state-backed operators. That led the country to revise its cybersecurity strategy, issuing a more offensive-minded document in 2016. It called for the development of cyber teams in the intelligence agencies. It also might have been a contributing factor to the creation of a specialized agency, called the Central Office for Information Technology in the Security Sphere (ZITiS), to develop innovative techniques to break into encrypted devices, develop exploits and malware for real time interception and accessing data at rest, as well as identify or purchase zero-days to support offensive capabilities. As Germany rolled out its 2016 strategy, the German military (Bundeswehr) centralized its cyber capacity by consolidating around 14,000 soldiers and IT personnel into a unified cyber command (CIR), loosely modelled on U.S. Cyber Command. CIRwants to achieve full operational capacity by the early 2020s and plans to perform strategic and tactical cyber operations against enemy assets. Usage scenarios include disrupting enemy military assets, battlefield support and reconnaissance on adversary IT assets. Full article: https://www.defenseone.com/ideas/2018/12/germany-develops-offensive-cyber-capabilities-without-coherent-strategy-what-do-them/153227

  • The US Military Is Genetically Engineering New Life Forms To Detect Enemy Subs

    December 7, 2018 | International, Naval, C4ISR

    The US Military Is Genetically Engineering New Life Forms To Detect Enemy Subs

    BY PATRICK TUCKER The Pentagon is also looking at living camouflage, self-healing paint, and a variety of other applications of engineered organisms, but the basic science remains a challenge. How do you detect submarines in an expanse as large as the ocean? The U.S. military hopes that common marine microorganisms might be genetically engineered into living tripwires to signal the passage of enemy subs, underwater vessels, or even divers. It's one of many potential military applications for so-called engineered organisms, a field that promises living camouflage that reacts to its surroundings to better avoid detection, new drugs and medicines to help deployed forces survive in harsh conditions, and more. But the research is in its very early stages, military officials said. The Naval Research Laboratory, or NRL, is supporting the research. Here's how it would work: You take an abundant sea organism, like Marinobacter, and change its genetic makeup to react to certain substances left by enemy vessels, divers, or equipment. These could be metals, fuel exhaust, human DNA, or some molecule that's not found naturally in the ocean but is associated with, say, diesel-powered submarines. The reaction could take the form of electron loss, which could be detectable to friendly sub drones. Full article: https://www.defenseone.com/technology/2018/12/us-military-genetically-engineering-new-life-forms-detect-enemy-subs/153200/

  • Brexit : le Royaume-Uni n'utilisera pas Galileo pour la défense ou des infrastructures critiques

    December 7, 2018 | International, Aerospace, C4ISR

    Brexit : le Royaume-Uni n'utilisera pas Galileo pour la défense ou des infrastructures critiques

    C'est l'un des dossiers « chauds » de la séparation entre l'Union européenne et les Anglais. Le gouvernement explique qu'il « explorera des pistes pour construire son propre système mondial de navigation par satellite, capable de guider les drones militaires, de gérer les réseaux d'énergie et de fournir des services essentiels aux smartphones ». « Compte tenu de la décision de la Commission d'interdire au Royaume-Uni de participer pleinement au développement de Galileo sous tous ses aspects, il est normal que nous trouvions des alternatives [...] Je ne peux pas laisser nos services armés s'appuyer sur un système dont nous ne pouvons être sûrs. Ce ne serait pas dans notre intérêt national », affirme la Première ministre Theresa May. « Et en tant qu'acteur mondial avec des ingénieurs de classe mondiale et des alliés indéfectibles dans le monde entier, nous ne sommes pas à court d'options », ajoute-t-elle, cherchant à rassurer. Les réactions n'ont pas tardé. Sam Gyimah, ministre des Sciences et des Universités, a annoncé sur sa page Facebook sa démission vendredi dernier. « Je ne peux soutenir l'accord du gouvernement tel qu'il est ». « Ce qui s'est passé avec Galileo est un avant-goût des négociations brutales que nous aurons à mener » ajoute-t-il, comme le rapporte l'AFP. Le Royaume-Uni aurait investi 1,4 milliard d'euros dans le système de positionnement par satellites européen : « nous ne récupérerons pas cet argent » affirme Sam Gyimah. https://www.nextinpact.com/brief/brexit---le-royaume-uni-n-utilisera-pas-galileo-pour-la-defense-ou-des-infrastructures-critiques-6839.htm

  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - November 30, 2018

    December 7, 2018 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - November 30, 2018

    NAVY Grove Resource Solutions Inc.,* Frederick, Maryland (N6523619D4800); Millennium Corp., * Arlington, Virginia (N6523619D4801); SimVentions Inc.,* Fredericksburg, Virginia (N6523619D4802); BAE Systems Technology Solutions & Services Inc., Rockville, Maryland (N6523619D8403); Booz Allen Hamilton, McLean, Virginia (N6523619D4804); CACI NSS Inc., Reston, Virginia (N6523619D4805); General Dynamics Information Technology, Fairfax, Virginia (N6523619D4806); Leidos, Reston, Virginia (N6523619D4807); Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Redondo Beach, California (N6523619D4808), and Scientific Research Corp., Atlanta, Georgia (N6523619D4809), are each awarded a combined $898,000,000 multiple award, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, performance-based service contract utilizing cost-plus-fixed-fee and firm-fixed-price task orders. The contracts are for Cyber Mission Engineering support services and provide for the delivery of information warfare capabilities through sea, air, land, space, electromagnetic, and cyber domains through the full range of military operations and levels of war. These contracts include a five-year ordering period, one 24-month option period, and one six-month option-to-extend-services in accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulation Clause 52.217-8. If all options are exercised, the cumulative value of these contracts will increase to $962,000,000. Work will be performed worldwide and is expected to be completed by November 2024. If all options are exercised, work would continue until May 2027. Navy working capital funds in the amount of $25,000 will be divided equally among all awardees and obligated at the time of award. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The multiple award contracts were competitively procured by full and open competition with reserves for small business via the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center e-Commerce central website and the Federal Business Opportunities website, with 25 timely offers received. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Atlantic, Charleston, South Carolina, is the contracting activity. Bechtel Plant Machinery Inc., Monroeville, Pennsylvania, is awarded an $889,949,558 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for Naval nuclear propulsion components. Work will be performed in Monroeville, Pennsylvania (74 percent); and Schenectady, New York (26 percent). No completion date or additional information is provided on Naval Nuclear Propulsion program contracts. Fiscal 2019 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy) funding in the amount of $617,385,193 will be obligated at time of award and funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured in accordance with 10 U.S. Code. 2304(c)(1) - only one responsible source and no other supplies or services will satisfy agency requirements. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity (N00024-19-C-2115). Bechtel Plant Machinery Inc., Monroeville, Pennsylvania, is awarded a $634,011,726 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for Naval nuclear propulsion components. Work will be performed in Monroeville, Pennsylvania (71 percent); and Schenectady, New York (29 percent). No completion date or additional information is provided on Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program contracts Fiscal 2019 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy) funding in the amount of $610,145,142 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured in accordance with 10 U.S. code 2304(c)(1) - only one responsible source and no other supplies or services will satisfy agency requirements. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity (N00024-19-C-2114). United Technologies Corp., Pratt & Whitney Military Engines, East Hartford, Connecticut, is awarded a $399,778,883 modification to a previously awarded fixed-price-incentive-firm, cost-plus-incentive-fee, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N00019-17-C-0010). This modification provides for performance based logistics sustainment in support of the F-35 Lightning II F135 propulsion system for the U.S Navy; U.S Air Force; U.S. Marine Corps; Non-U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) participants, and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) customers. This modification provides for maintenance of support equipment; common program activities; unique and common base recurring sustainment; repair of repairable; field service representatives; common replenishment spares; conventional take-off and landing/carrier variant F135 unique maintenance services, and short take-off and landing F135 unique services. Work will be performed in East Hartford, Connecticut (73 percent); Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (18 percent); Camari, Italy (3 percent); Eglin Air Force Base (AFB), Florida (2 percent); Edwards AFB, California (1 percent); Hill AFB, Utah (1 percent); Luke AFB, Arizona (1 percent); and Marine Corps Air Station, Beaufort, South Carolina (1 percent), and is expected to be completed in November 2019. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Air Force, Marine Corps, and Navy), Non-U.S. DOD participants and FMS funds in the amount of $399,778,883 are being obligated on this award, $277,624,046, of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract combines purchases for the U.S. Air Force ($142,300,541; 36 percent); U.S. Marine Corps ($109,353,811; 27 percent); U.S. Navy ($25,969,694; 6 percent); non-U.S. DOD participants ($90,987,493; 23 percent); and FMS customers ($31,167,344; 8 percent) under the FMS Program. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Bechtel Plant Machinery Inc., Monroeville, Pennsylvania, is awarded a $233,211,071 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for Naval nuclear propulsion components. Work will be performed in Monroeville, Pennsylvania (93 percent); and Schenectady, New York (7 percent). No completion date or additional information is provided on Naval Nuclear Propulsion program contracts. Fiscal 2019 other procurement (Navy) funding in the amount of $111,996,969 and fiscal 2019 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy) funding in the amount of $2,852,823 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity (N00024-19-C-2112). Accenture Federal Services LLP, Arlington, Virginia (N00189-19-D-Z001); Deloitte & Touche LLP, Arlington, Virginia (N00189-19-D-Z002); KPMG LLP, McLean, Virginia (N00189-19-D-Z003); PricewaterhouseCoopers Public Sector LLP, McLean, Virginia (N00189-19-D-Z004); and Sehlke Consulting, Arlington, Virginia (N00189-19-D-Z005), are awarded combined estimated $83,855,994 cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple award contracts that will include terms and conditions for the placement of both cost-plus-fixed-fee and firm-fixed-price task orders to provide financial and business operations management support services in support of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. The contracts will run concurrently and will include a 48-month ordering period. The ordering period of the contract is anticipated to begin February 2019 and is expected to be completed by January 2023. Work will be performed at various contractor locations throughout the U.S. (80 percent); and at government facilities in Falls Church, Virginia (20 percent). The percentage of work at each of the contractor facilities cannot be determined at this time. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Defense Health Program) funds in the amount of $100,000 will be obligated ($20,000 on each of the five contracts to fund the contracts' minimum amounts) and funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured for the award of multiple contracts pursuant to the authority set forth in Federal Acquisition Regulation 16.504. The requirement was solicited through the Federal Business Opportunities and Navy Electronic Commerce Online websites, with eight offers received. Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center Norfolk, Contracting Department Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity. Raytheon Co., Tewksbury, Massachusetts, is awarded a $45,009,813 modification to previously awarded contract N00024-17-C-5145 to exercise options for DDG 1000 ship class integrated logistics support and engineering services. The DDG 1000 ship class is a multi-mission surface combatant designed to fulfill volume firepower and precision strike requirements. DDG 1000 combat systems provide offensive, distributed, and precision firepower and long ranges in support of forces ashore, while incorporating signature reduction, active, and passive self-defense system and enhanced survivability features. Work will be performed in Portsmouth, Rhode Island (61 percent); Tewksbury, Massachusetts (34 percent); Marlboro, Massachusetts (2 percent); Ft. Wayne, Indiana (2 percent); and Nashua, New Hampshire (1 percent), and is expected to be completed by September 2019. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy); and 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) funding in the amount of $54,256,958 will be obligated at the time of award, and funds in the amount of $10,158,276 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. Kings Bay Support Services LLC, Alexandria, Virginia, is awarded a $39,858,516 modification for the exercise of option three under an indefinite-delivery indefinite-quantity contract for base operations support (BOS) services at Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay. After award of this option, the total cumulative contract value will be $322,733,069. The work to be performed provides for all labor, facilities management, supervision, tools, materials, equipment, incidental engineering, environmental services and transportation to effectively execute BOS services. Work will be performed in Kings Bay, Georgia. This option period is from December 2018, to November 2019. No funds will be obligated at time of award. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $28,258,930 for recurring work will be obligated on individual task orders issued during the option period. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southeast, Jacksonville, Florida is the contracting activity (N69450-11-D-7578). General Dynamics Electric Boat Corp., Groton, Connecticut, is awarded a $31,764,038 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-17-C-2104) for reactor plant planning yard services for nuclear-powered submarines and support yard services for the Navy's Moored Training Ships. This modification includes options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this modification to $63,846,335. Work will be performed in Groton, Connecticut (90 percent); and Charleston, South Carolina (10 percent), and is expected to be completed by September 2019. Fiscal 2018 other procurement (Navy); and fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) funding in the amount of $23,532,530 will be obligated at time of award and funding in the amount of $17,999,876 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. BAE Systems Technology Solutions & Services Inc., Rockville, Maryland, is awarded $28,893,602 for modification P00022 to previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N00030-17-C-0001), to provide systems engineering and integration services in support of the Trident II (D5) strategic weapons system, the SSGN attack weapon system, and strategic weapon surety. Work will be performed at Rockville, Maryland (70.6 percent); Washington, District of Columbia (14.7 percent); Kings Bay, Georgia (5.1 percent); Silverdale, Washington (2.7 percent); Norfolk, Virginia (1.1 percent); San Diego, California (1.1 percent); Barrow, United Kingdom (1.1 percent); Alexandria, Virginia (1 percent); Buffalo, New York (0.3 percent); Downington, Pennsylvania (0.3 percent); Ocala, Florida (0.2 percent); Pittsfield, Massachusetts (0.2 percent); Montgomery Village, Maryland (0.2 percent); New Lebanon, New York (0.2 percent); New Paris, Ohio (0.2 percent); Wexford, Pennsylvania (0.2 percent); Alton, Virginia (0.2 percent); Springfield, Virginia (0.2 percent), Vienna, Virginia (0.2 percent); and St. Mary's, Georgia (0.2 percent), with an expected completion date of September 30, 2019. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $21,625,865; fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funds in the amount of $4,350,554; and fiscal 2019 other procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $2,917,183 will be obligated on this modification. Contract funds in the amount of $21,625,865 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Strategic Systems Programs, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. Lockheed Martin Space, Sunnyvale, California, is awarded $28,574,689 for cost-plus-fixed-fee modification P00002 to a previously awarded contract (N00030-18-C-0025), to exercise options for hypersonic booster technology development seeking to demonstrate technologies related to intermediate range capability through booster design, fabrication and validation testing. Work will be performed in Magna, Utah (51.03 percent); Elma, New York (14.08 percent); Sunnyvale, California (14.03 percent); Denver, Colorado (10.52 percent); Titusville, Florida (7.53 percent); Huntsville, Alabama (1.08 percent); Mooresville, North Carolina (1 percent); Cape Canaveral, Florida (0.52 percent); and Valley Forge, Pennsylvania (0.21 percent), with an expected completion date of Sept. 30, 2020. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test, and evaluation funds in the amount of $28,574,689 are being obligated on this award, which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Strategic Systems Programs, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. Lockheed Martin, Rotary and Mission Systems, Moorestown, New Jersey, is awarded a $20,583,568 fixed-price-incentive (firm target) and cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to previously-awarded contract N00024-14-C-5104 to exercise options for ship integration and test of the Aegis Weapon System (AWS) for AWS baselines through Advanced Capability Build (ACB) 12. The contract provides for Aegis shipboard integration engineering; Aegis test team support; Aegis modernization team engineering support; ballistic missile defense test team support and AWS element assessments. The contract will cover the AWS ship integration and test efforts for five new-construction DDG 51-class ships, the major modernization of five DDG 51-class ships, and the major modernization of six CG 47-class ships, as well as the integrated combat system modifications and upgrades for all current ships with all AWS baselines up to and including ACB 12. Work will be performed in Bath, Maine (41 percent); Moorestown, New Jersey (17 percent); Pascagoula, Mississippi (9 percent); Norfolk, Virginia (8 percent); Camden, New Jersey (8 percent); San Diego, California (6 percent); Corona, California (5 percent); Deveselu, Romania (3 percent); Mayport, Florida (2 percent); and various places below one percent (1 percent), and is expected to be completed by November 2019. Fiscal 2013 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy); fiscal 2017, and 2019 other procurement (Navy); and fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) funding in the amount of $17,260,714 will be obligated at time of award, and $2,036,071 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, is awarded a $9,838,779 modification to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contract (N00019-18-D-0001). This modification increases the ceiling of the indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contract and provides for service life modifications on the F/A-18E/F fleet that will extend the operational service life of the F/A-18E/F fleet from 6,000 flight hours to 9,000 flight hours. Work will be performed in St. Louis, Missouri, and is expected to be completed in July 2020. Fiscal 2018 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $9,838,779 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Lockheed Martin Corporation Missile and Fire Control, Orlando, Florida, is awarded a $7,346,222 definitive job order which includes cost-plus-fixed-fee level of effort tasking for the Target Sight System (TSS) depot activation and firm-fixed price training for the depot activation under basic ordering agreement N00164-16-G-JQ87. Depot activation services include engineering and logistics support and stand-up for long term organic depot support for the TSS on the AH-1Z Cobra attack helicopter. The TSS is a large-aperture midwave forward-looking infrared sensor with a laser designator/rangefinder turret. The TSS provides the capability to identify and laser-designate targets at maximum weapon range, significantly enhancing platform survivability and lethality. The depot activation and training services will produce a TSS depot capability at Fleet Readiness Center South-East to include the required specialized weapons replaceable assembly and shop replaceable assembly test equipment, tooling, fixtures, training, access to technical data, engineering reach back, and support infrastructure for this capability. Work will be performed in Jacksonville, Florida, and is expected to be completed in December 2020. Fiscal 2017 aircraft procurement (Navy) funding in the amount of $7,346,222 will be obligated at the time of contract award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This job order was not competitively procured in accordance with 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1): only one responsible source and no other supplies or services will satisfy agency requirements. Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, Indiana, is the contracting activity (N0016419FJ016). AIR FORCE L-3 Communications Vertex Aerospace LLC, Madison, Mississippi, has been awarded a $97,491,260 firm-fixed-price contract for contractor operated and maintained base supply of the Air Education and Training Command fleet of 178 T-1A trainer aircraft. Work will be performed at Randolph Air Force Base, Texas; Laughlin AFB, Texas; Vance AFB, Oklahoma; Columbus AFB, Mississippi; and Pensacola Naval Air Station, Florida, with an expected completion date of Nov. 30, 2019. This award for Option One is the result of a competitive acquisition and three offers were received. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds in the amount $48,288,767 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, is the contracting activity (FA8106-18-C-0001). M1 Support Services, Denton, Texas, has been awarded a $97,353,460 modification (P00048) to contract FA4890-16-C-0005 for the backshop and flight-line maintenance of multiple aircraft types on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. The contract modification provides for the exercise of an option for an additional year of maintenance support under the multiple year contract. Work will be performed at Nellis AFB, Nevada, and is expected to be completed by Dec. 31, 2019. Air Combat Command, Acquisition Management and Integration Center, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, is the contracting activity. AAR Manufacturing Inc., Cadillac, Michigan, has been awarded a $27,570,625 task order (FA8534-19-F-0005) to contract FA8519-14-D-0002 for the production of 463L cargo pallets. Work will be performed in Cadillac, Michigan, and is expected to be completed by Dec. 30, 2020. Fiscal 2017 other procurement funds in the amount of $27,570,625 are being obligated at time of award. This task order brings the total cumulative face value of the contract to $170,687,010. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity. Raytheon Co. Missile Systems Division, Tucson, Arizona, has been awarded an $18,691,155 fixed-price incentive (firm-target), follow-on contract for High-speed Anti-Radiation Missile targeting system contractor logistics support services. This contract provides depot repair and sustaining engineering activities. Work will be performed in Tucson, Arizona, and is expected to be completed by Nov. 30, 2019. The contract includes a one-year period of performance with three one-year options. This contract award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $18,691,155 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, is the contracting activity (FA8675-19-C-0004). Telos Corp., Ashborn, Virginia, has been awarded a $15,195,573 modification (P00004) to contract FA4890-17-F-0025 for defensive cyber operations support at 17 U.S. Air Force bases in the continental U.S. The contract modification provides for the exercise of an option for an additional year of cyber security support services under the multiple year contract. Work will be performed in accordance with the performance work statement and is expected to be completed by Jan. 1, 2020. Air Combat Command, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, is the contracting activity. Honeywell International Inc., Clearwater, Florida, has been awarded an $11,458,551 modification (P0003) to exercise an option on contract FA8214-18-C-0001 for Pendulous Integrated Gyroscopic Accelerometer float repairs. Work will be performed in Clearwater, Florida, and is expected to be completed by Dec. 20, 2019. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $11,458,551 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center, Hill Air Force Base, Utah, is the contracting activity. The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, has been awarded a $10,758,587 modification (P00066) to previously awarded FA8634-16-C-2653 for F-15 radar modernization program radar upgrades. The contract modification provides for the exercise of options for interim contract support repair. Work will be performed in St. Louis, and is expected to be completed by Dec. 31, 2019. Fiscal 2017 aircraft procurement funds in the amount of $10,758,587 are being obligated at the time of award. Total cumulative face value of the contract is $1,375,218,427. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity. Sierra Nevada Corp., Sparks, Nevada, has been awarded a $9,227,540 modification (P00019) to contract FA8509-17-C-0002 for the permanent installation of the Airborne Mission Networking System. This modification provides for the exercise of only trial kit install labor and fully funding non-recurring engineering, travel, and trial kit install labor. Work will be performed in Centennial, Colorado, with travel within the continental U.S. as required to government facilities for installation and testing. Work is expected to be completed by Sept. 16, 2019. Fiscal 2018 and 2019 research, development, test, and evaluation funds in the amount of $9,227,540 are being obligated at time of award. Total cumulative face value of the contract is $39,256,804. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA8509-17-C-0002). DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Oshkosh Defense LLC, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, has been awarded a maximum $84,448,463 firm-fixed-price contract for various motor vehicle parts and accessories. This was a sole source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a three-year base contract with two one-year option periods. Location of performance is Wisconsin, with a Nov. 29, 2021, performance completion date. Using military services are Army and Marine Corps. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2018, through 2021 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Land and Maritime, Columbus, Ohio (SPE7LX-19-D-0021). Nodak Electric Cooperative Inc.,* Grand Forks, North Dakota, has been awarded a $23,203,633 modification (P00002) to a 50-year utilities privatization contract (SP0600-18-C-8321) with no option periods for additional utility services for two electric systems. This is a fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment contract. Location of performance is North Dakota, with a Nov. 30, 2068, performance completion date. Using military service is Air Force. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019, through 2069 Air Force operations and maintenance funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Energy, Fort Belvoir, Virginia. The Original Footwear Co., Arecibo, Puerto Rico, has been awarded a maximum $9,186,840 modification (P00014), exercising the third one-year option period of a four-year base contract (SPE1C1-16-D-1026), with three one-year option periods for men's poromeric shoes. This is firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/definite-quantity contract. Locations of performance are Puerto Rico and Michigan, with a Nov. 30, 2019, performance completion date. Using customers are Army, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. Type of appropriation fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. DEFENSE HEALTH AGENCY Logistics Health Inc., La Crosse, Wisconsin, was awarded an $81,000,000 indefinite-delivery bridge contract (HT0011-19-D-0002). This award, titled “Reserve Health Readiness Program,” provides health readiness support services to the military service components to meet medical and dental standards essential in maintaining a deployable force. This short-term bridge contract will permit time to complete a competitive follow-on to this requirement. Services include immunizations, physical examinations, periodic health assessments, post-deployment health reassessments, mental health assessments, dental examinations, dental treatment, laboratory services, and other services as required to satisfy military service component health readiness needs. Services are delivered at military service component designated sites during group events, through the contractor's call center, and within an integrated network. The work will be performed in every U.S. state, U.S. territory, the District of Columbia, and Germany, with period of performance from Dec. 1, 2018, to May 31, 2019. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds will be obligated on task orders issued under this award. This contract was awarded on an other than full and open competition basis; pursuant to the authority of 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1). The Defense Health Agency, Falls Church, Virginia, is the contracting activity. ARMY BridgePhase LLC,* Arlington, Virginia (W15QKN-19-D-0005); Insap Services Inc.,* Marlton, New Jersey (W15QKN-19-D-0006); Johnson Technology Systems Inc.,* Dover, New Jersey (W15QKN-19-D-0007); and Softek International Inc.,* Piscataway, New Jersey (W15QKN-19-D-0008), will compete for each order of the $72,377,360 firm-fixed-price contract for information technology services for Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center. Bids were solicited with seven received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 8, 2023. U.S. Army Contracting Command, New Jersey, is the contracting activity. Carolina Growler Inc.,* Star, North Carolina, was awarded a $66,665,620 firm-fixed-price contract for M1269 light engineer utility trailers. Bids were solicited with six received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 29, 2025. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W56HZV-19-D-0013). Longbow LLC, Orlando, Florida, was awarded a $52,642,959 hybrid cost-plus-fixed-fee and firm-fixed-price contract for the production of radar electronic units and support functions. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work will be performed in Orlando, Florida, with an estimated completion date of March 31, 2022. Fiscal 2018 and 2019 aircraft procurement, Army funds in the amount of $52,642,959 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, is the contracting activity (W52P1J-19-F-0044). Employment Source Inc.,* Fayetteville, North Carolina, was awarded a $43,500,000 firm-fixed-price contract for dining facility attendant services. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 29, 2023. U.S. Army Mission and Installation Contracting Command, Fort Bragg, North Carolina, is the contracting activity (W91247-19-D-0002). DynCorp International LLC, Fort Worth, Texas, was awarded a $41,658,522 modification (P00200), to contract W58RGZ-13-C-0040 for aviation field maintenance services. Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas; Afghanistan; and Iraq, with an estimated completion date of June 30, 2019. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance Army funds in the amount of $41,658,522 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity. University of California-Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, was awarded an $18,000,000 cost contract for collaborative biotechnologies. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 30, 2021. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity (W911NF-19-D-0001). Weeks Marine Inc., Covington, Louisiana, was awarded a $17,418,500 firm-fixed-price contract for dredging. Two bids were solicited with two bids received. Work will be performed in Carolina Beach, North Carolina; and Kure Beach, North Carolina, with an estimated completion date of May 15, 2019. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance Army funds in the amount of $17,418,500 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Wilmington, North Carolina, is the contracting activity (W912PM-19-C-0004). DEFENSE FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING SERVICE KPMG LLP, McLean, Virginia, is being awarded a maximum $36,039,975 modification (P00027) to exercise Option Year Two to previously awarded labor-hour contract HQ0423-17-F-0010 for fiscal 2019 financial statement audit services of the Army General Fund and Working Capital Fund. The modification brings the total cumulative face value of the contract to $95,894,268 from $59,854,293. Work will be performed in McLean, Virginia, with an expected completion date of Nov. 30, 2019. Fiscal 2019 Army operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $36,039,975 are being obligated at the time of the award. The Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Contract Services Directorate, Columbus, Ohio, is the contracting activity (HQ0423-17-F-0010). MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY Raytheon Missile Systems is being awarded a sole-source cost-plus-fixed-fee modification in the amount of $27,277,473 to previously awarded contract HQ0276-15-C-0005 adding contract line item numbers 4005, 4006, and 4013 to provide depot level planning, All Up Round (AUR) re-certifications, and AUR repairs. This modification increases the total cumulative face value of the contract by $27,277,473 (from $1,757,712,887 to $1,784,990,360). The work will be performed in Tucson, Arizona, with an expected completion date of October 2019. Fiscal 2019 operations maintenance funds in the amount of $9,000,000 will be obligated at the time of award. The Missile Defense Agency, Dahlgren, Virginia, is the contracting activity. *Small business https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1702589/source/GovDelivery/

  • Squad X Improves Situational Awareness, Coordination for Dismounted Units

    November 30, 2018 | International, C4ISR

    Squad X Improves Situational Awareness, Coordination for Dismounted Units

    The first test of DARPA's Squad X Experimentation program successfully demonstrated the ability to extend and enhance the situational awareness of small, dismounted units. In a weeklong test series at Twentynine Palms, California, U.S. Marine squads improved their ability to synchronize maneuvers, employing autonomous air and ground vehicles to detect threats from multiple domains – physical, electromagnetic, and cyber – providing critical intelligence as the squad moved through scenarios. Squad X provides Army and Marine dismounted units with autonomous systems equipped with off-the-shelf technologies and novel sensing tools developed via DARPA's Squad X Core Technologies program. The technologies aim to increase squads' situational awareness and lethality, allowing enemy engagement with greater tempo and from longer ranges. The Squad X program manager in DARPA's Tactical Technology Office, Lt. Col. Phil Root (U.S. Army), said Experiment 1 demonstrated the ability for the squad to communicate and collaborate, even while “dancing on the edge of connectivity.” The squad members involved in the test runs praised the streamlined tools, which allowed them to take advantage of capabilities that previously had been too heavy or cumbersome for individual Soldiers and Marines to use in demanding field conditions. “Each run, they learned a bit more on the systems and how they could support the operation,” said Root, who is also program manager for Squad X Core Technologies. “By the end, they were using the unmanned ground and aerial systems to maximize the squad's combat power and allow a squad to complete a mission that normally would take a platoon to execute.” Two performers, Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control and CACI's BIT Systems, each are working on different approaches to provide unique capabilities to enhance ground infantries. Manned-unmanned teaming is critical to both companies' solutions. Marines testing Lockheed Martin's Augmented Spectral Situational Awareness, and Unaided Localization for Transformative Squads (ASSAULTS) system used autonomous robots with sensor systems to detect enemy locations, allowing the Marines to engage and target the enemy with a precision 40mm grenade before the enemy could detect their movement. Small units using CACI's BITS Electronic Attack Module (BEAM) were able to detect, locate, and attack specific threats in the radio frequency and cyber domains. Experiment 2 is currently targeted for early 2019. https://www.darpa.mil/news-events/2018-11-30a

  • Why can't Ottawa get military procurement right?

    November 30, 2018 | Local, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

    Why can't Ottawa get military procurement right?

    Murray Brewster · CBC News The last couple of weeks may go down in the Trudeau government's public record as the point when the desires of deliverology met the drawbacks of defence procurement. Remember 'deliverology'? That lofty concept — measuring a government's progress in delivering on its promises — was the vogue in policy circles at the beginning of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's administration. While it's sometimes derided as an empty concept, deliverology must have seemed tailor-made for a new government inheriting a troubled defence procurement system. The Canadian International Trade Tribunal's decision Tuesday to step into the brawl over which multinational consortium will design and support the construction of the navy's new frigates is another lesson in how (apologies to Robert Burns) the best laid plans of mice and men go awry. The tribunal's decision to order Ottawa to put the frigate project on hold pending the completion of their probe into a complaint by a failed bidder comes at a politically awkward time for the Liberals. One week ago, Auditor General Michael Ferguson delivered an ugly report on the Liberals' handling of fighter jet procurement — specifically, the plan to buy interim warplanes to cover the gap until the current CF-18 fleet can be replaced with new aircraft. Self-inflicted wounds A cynic's reflex (given the checkered history of defence purchasing over the last decade) might be to consider these two events as just another day at the office for the troubled government procurement system. That might not be entirely fair. Still, experts were saying Wednesday that the government is suffering from numerous self-inflicted political and administrative wounds on this file. With a federal election on the horizon, and in a climate of growing geopolitical instability, the question of what the government has actually managed to deliver on military procurement is an important one to ask, said Rob Huebert, an analyst in strategic studies at the University of Calgary. While the system, as the Trudeau Liberals and previous governments have constructed it, seems to be the perfect model of the "evidence based" policy making promised by the champions of deliverology, it's also not built for speed. Some would suggest the deliverology model was followed to the letter in the design competition now tied up before the trade tribunal and in Federal Court. What seemed like endless consultations with the bidders took two years. The government made up to 88 amendments to the tender. And in the end, the preferred bid was challenged by a competitor that claims not all of the navy's criteria were met. Alion Science and Technology Corp. and its subsidiary, Alion Canada, argue the warship Lockheed Martin Canada and BAE System Inc. want to sell to Ottawa cannot meet the speed requirements set by the tender without a substantial overhaul. It does not, the company claims, meet the government's demand for a proven, largely off-the-shelf design. Michael Armstrong, who teaches at Brock University and holds a doctorate in management science, said the government could have avoided the challenges and accompanying slowdowns had it been more precise in its language. "They could have been more clear and firm when they use the words 'proven design'," he said. "Did they literally mean we won't buy ships unless they're floating in the water? Or did they mean that British one that doesn't quite exist yet is close enough? "If they would have been more firm and said, 'We want a ship that actually exists,' that might have simplified things at this stage." Huebert described the auditor general's report on the purchase of interim fighters as an all-out assault on evidence-based policy making. "It is just so damning," he said. A break with reality The Conservatives have accused the Liberals of avoiding the purchase of the F-35 stealth jet through manufacturing a crisis by claiming the air force doesn't have enough fighters to meet its international commitments. The auditor found that the military could not meet the government's new policy commitment and even ignored advice that one of its proposed solutions — buying brand-new Super Hornets to fill the capability gap —would actually make their problems worse, not better. That statement, said Huebert, suggested a jaw-dropping break with reality on the government's part. "They [the Liberals] were just making things up," he said. It might have been too optimistic to expect the Liberals to fix the system, said Armstrong, given the short four years between elections. But Huebert said Ottawa can't carry on with business as usual — that the government now must deliver on procurement, instead of doubling down on rhetoric. The problem, he said, is that governments haven't really paid a price in the past for botched military procurement projects. There was "no political pain for the agony of the Sea King replacement, as an example," he said, referring to the two-decade long process to retire the air force's maritime helicopters. "The thing that makes me so concerned, even outraged, is that we are heading into a so much more dangerous international environment," said Huebert, citing last weekend's clash between Russia and Ukraine over the Kerch Strait and ongoing tension with Beijing in the South China Sea. "When things get nasty, we have to be ready." https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/why-can-t-ottawa-get-military-procurement-right-1.4924800

  • What will forces need in complex EW environment?

    November 30, 2018 | International, C4ISR

    What will forces need in complex EW environment?

    By: Mark Pomerleau Sophisticated adversaries have been leveraging the electromagnetic spectrum to create significant dilemmas for U.S. and allied forces, say officials, and transformative efforts are needed to deal with an increasing complicated threat. “China is outspending us probably 10 to 1 on trying to figure out how to use and manipulate the electromagnetic spectrum. Russia showed us what they're going to do with it in their incursion into Ukraine ... Electromagnetic warfare, electronic warfare at the maneuver level,” Gen. Paul Selva, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said at the annual Association of Old Crows symposium held Nov. 28 in Washington, D.C. “We haven't designed ourselves to fight that fight. They have demonstrated that they are not only willing, but they're [also] capable of deploying and employing electronic countermeasures at the ground and maneuver level. It is a reality that we are going to have to adjust to.” The capabilities forces need For the Army, it's not going to be one thing, Col. Mark Dotson, the capabilities manager for electronic warfare at the Cyber Center of Excellence, said at the symposium Nov. 27. There have to be layered capabilities and effects, each increasing range and sensing capability. “We're still sorting through that,” Dotson said, noting the need to develop from the current tactical focus all the way to the strategic level. “We're trying to expand our scope and get into what are those other things we need. Do we need artillery delivered capability? Do we need loitering munitions? Is it going to manned or is it an unmanned aircraft?” In addition, Dotson said, the Army needs systems integrating EW, cyber and signals intelligence, and the service has started generating requirements working with the Intelligence Center of Excellence and the Cyber Center of Excellence. “I think SIGINT and EW go hand in hand, so us not sharing going forward and working like a team like we do now makes no sense,” Col. Jennifer McAfee, Dotson's counterpart for Terrestrial and Identity at the Army Intelligence Center of Excellence, told C4ISRNET in a November interview. McAfee added that the team is also joining up with the other centers of excellence to ensure that when they are pursuing requirements for airborne or ground systems, the Intelligence and Cyber centers are plugged in to leverage EW expertise and not create duplicative efforts. Geolocating solutions Others across the joint force have expressed the desire for more decoys, physical or non-physical, to confuse or confound enemy systems. “It's network electronic warfare from air, sea and land; it's smart warfare combined with advanced decoys, whether they're physical decoys or cyber decoys out there; drones, swarms and jamming drones,” Col. John Edwards, commander of the 28th Bomb Wing, said at the symposium. “Things that go out there to where an air defense operator cannot distinguish between what is cyber and what is real out there.” Such aerial systems can be used to either overwhelm or distract air defenses, allowing strike aircraft to penetrate, or take the point jamming the air defenses and thus assuming all the risk leaving the more expensive and manned systems in the rear. On the ground side, officials have also discussed the need for more investments in decoys. Lt. Gen. Stephen Fogarty, commander of Army Cyber Command, told reporters in August that big investments needed to be made in this area. He envisioned forces being able to drop a decoy emitting strong signals off a truck at a fork in the road, thus drawing enemy attention to it. “Now we're presenting multiple dilemmas to the adversary,” he said. One of the difficulties of modern warfare is all jammers and sensors emit some kind of a signal in the electromagnetic spectrum, meaning they can be geolocated and targeted. This means if an enemy wants to use it, they have to take into account a risk calculus in revealing their position. “Jammers are emitters, emitters are targets. I think that's something we really ought to be thinking about,” Selva said. “If you're going to operate in an electronically dense environment ... the tools actually reveal their position." Similarly, decoys can be used to throw adversaries off the trail of friendly forces or distract from other items forces might want to protect. ”If I have something like a counterfire radar, that's really important to me. Maybe what I want to do, again, is push an alternate threat to the adversary," Fogarty said. In these complex environments, Selva said forces need to be able to identify, localize and characterize the jammer. If that's possible, then forces can decide what to do with it. If the answer is they want to kill it, they have to have a tool to kill it. “If you can't do all three of those things, the jamming is very effective,” he said. https://www.c4isrnet.com/electronic-warfare/2018/11/29/what-will-forces-need-in-complex-ew-environment

  • Europe de la défense : Emmanuel Macron attend de nouvelles propositions

    November 30, 2018 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

    Europe de la défense : Emmanuel Macron attend de nouvelles propositions

    Par Nathalie Guibert Il a déjà remis une note d'étape à Emmanuel Macron, son rapport sera bouclé à la fin de l'année. Missionné par le président sur le sujet piégé de l'Europe de la défense, l'ancien secrétaire général pour la défense et la sécurité nationale, Louis Gautier (par ailleurs membre du conseil de surveillance du Monde), suggère des décisions fortes. Sa mission s'achèvera en février 2019 après des consultations diplomatiques pour tester les idées retenues par l'Elysée. « En parlant d'armée européenne, Emmanuel Macron permet d'incarner le projet pour nos concitoyens, de secouer la technostructure, de pousser à la clarification des choix, car le moment de vérité arrive pour les Européens », indique-t-il. Tout l'inverse des petits pas symbolisés par « l'initiative européenne d'intervention » avancée par le même Macron en septembre 2017, un concept dit « pragmatique » d'échange stratégique – hors des cadres formels dédiés de l'Union européenne –, sur lequel la ministre des armées, Florence Parly, travaille. M. Gautier considère ce projet comme un pis-aller à court terme, le résultat tangible minimum dans la période de crise politique que connaît l'Europe. « Beaucoup sont déçus par les résultats opérationnels de la défense européenne dans les administrations, aux affaires étrangères comme à la défense. Ils pensent que le militaire restera toujours du ressort national ou de l'OTAN, et que l'Europe ne servira qu'à financer les ... Article complet: https://www.lemonde.fr/international/article/2018/11/28/europe-de-la-defense-emmanuel-macron-attend-de-nouvelles-propositions_5389767_3210.html

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