Filter Results:

All sectors

All categories

    3540 news articles

    You can refine the results using the filters above.

  • Britain eyes a more lethal force in newly revealed defense modernization review

    December 19, 2018 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

    Britain eyes a more lethal force in newly revealed defense modernization review

    By: Andrew Chuter LONDON — Britain is to rebuild weapon stockpiles, strengthen Joint Forces Command and earmark cash to rapidly innovate as part of a long-awaited defense modernization review revealed Tuesday by Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson. The defense secretary told Parliament on Dec. 18 that the review, known as the Modernising Defence Programme, would improve the lethality, reach and mass of the armed forces. However, he stopped short on detailing where the cash would coming from and who the long-term winners and losers might be in regard to capabilities and programs as priorities change. Although Williamson told lawmakers he would do “everything within my power to make sure that the U.K. remains a tier-one military power,” his statement disappointed some in the defense sector for its blandness. Labour, the main opposition party in Britian, called the statement “waffle” and said Williamson had done nothing to address a funding shortfall of between £7 billion and £15 billion (U.S. $8.8 billion and $18.9 billion) in equipment budgets over the next 10 years. Some analysts also felt the yearlong review had failed to deliver. “It's an announcement about future announcements, it's the [Ministry of Defence] keeping lots of option open, “ said Jon Louth, the director of defense, industries and society at the Royal United Services Institute think tank in London. “It's all about seeing what can be achieved in next year's governmentwide departmental spending review." Howard Wheeldon, a British-based defense commentator, said the review had “hardly a specific detail of anything that really matters other than some minimal strategic intentions to be found amongst the prose. Perhaps the best that can be said is that while it contains many strategic positives, loads of ambition and intent, at the very least it doesn't contain any new specifics in relation to planned cuts.” Alex Ashbourne-Walmsley of Ashbourne Strategic Consulting said the review was an “anti-climax.” “We have waited all year for this, and what we have is a very thin document. It's hard to fault the aspiration, but making it a reality is a different matter. Where's the money coming from?” she said. Ashbourne-Walmsley and Louth agreed the MoD's success, or otherwise, in securing additional funds when the government's departmental medium-term spending plans are agreed sometime next year is the key. “For the MoD, it's all about next year's departmental spending review. It's unfortunate that the moment the review came on the horizon, that invalidated most of the things that the modernizing defense review could have hoped to achieve,” Ashbourne-Walmsley said. “A lot of these plans are hostage to fortune in terms of the spending review [known as the comprehensive spending review], economic damage from Brexit and even a change of government,” she added. The MoD has secured an additional £1.8 billion in funding this year from the Treasury for spending on items like the nuclear deterrent, anti-submarine warfare and cipher capabilities, but the department still has considerable work to do to balance the books on a total budget slated to top £39 billion next year. The National Audit Office, the government's financial watchdog, reckons the MoD is at least £7 billion overcommitted on its 10-year, £186 billion equipment plan. But, the office admits, it could be a lot more. Williamson acknowledged the MoD had to create “financial headroom for modernization,” but told Parliament this could be achieved through efficiencies. “Based on our work to date, we expect to achieve over the next decade the very demanding efficiency targets we were set in 2015, including through investment in a program of digital transformation,” he said. Analysts here reckon that's an optimistic target without capability cuts; although there was no mention of any reductions in the statement. “We all know that you cannot [achieve efficiency targets] without taking the knife to something. So what we may be able to deduce or fear is that hidden out there somewhere is a chapter of probable announcements of what might yet be to come,” Wheeldon said. One thing appears: Spending priorities are set to change as the MoD reacts to the growing threat from potential adversaries. That includes rebuilding depleted weapons stockpiles. “To improve the combat effectiveness of our forces, we will re-prioritize the current defense program to increase weapon stockpiles. And we are accelerating work to assure the resilience of our defense systems and capabilities,“ Williamson said. “We will improve the readiness and availability of a range of key defense platforms: major warships, attack submarines, helicopters and a range of ISTAR platforms,” he added, without concrete details. Williamson also said Joint Forces Command capabilities are set to be upgraded. “A major new step will involve an improved Joint Forces Command that will be in a better position so that defense can play a major role in preventing conflict in the future and improve our cyber operations and capabilities across the armed forces, but also across government as well,” he said. “Our adversaries and competitors are accelerating the development of new capabilities and strategies. We must keep pace and conceive of our joint force as consisting of five domains — air, land, sea, cyber and space — rather than the traditional three,” he told lawmakers. The review might have been short on details, but the MoD is pledging to drive the military modernization effort with funding, albeit a small amount, for innovation. Britain already has a small defense innovation fund, which this year has £20 million to put toward projects in areas including unmanned air systems, virtual reality training and enhanced digital communications. The fund will grow to £50 million in the next financial year. New “Spearhead” innovation programs will apply cutting-edge technologies to areas including subsurface threats to submarines; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities; and command and control in the land environment. For now, the MoD is investing £160 million to create a transformation fund, but additional money may be available in the upcoming comprehensive spending review if Williamson can make the case for it. “I will ring-fence £160 million of MoD's budget to create this [transformation] fund available for innovative new military capabilities. I will look to make a further £340 million available as part of the spending review. This fund will be available for new innovative military capabilities, which allows us to stay one step ahead of our adversaries," Williamson argued. https://www.defensenews.com/global/europe/2018/12/18/britain-eyes-a-more-lethal-force-in-newly-revealed-defense-modernization-review

  • UK: Modernising Defence Programme - Update

    December 19, 2018 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

    UK: Modernising Defence Programme - Update

    Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson has provided a final update on the Modernising Defence Programme to the House of Commons. In July, I made a statement setting out headline conclusions from six months of work on the Modernising Defence Programme (MDP). Since then, work has continued apace. Firstly, I would like to welcome the extra £1.8 billion of funding for Defence, including the additional £1 billion that was in last month's Budget. Today, I want to provide an update on the MDP, and set out the work that will be ongoing. I have placed a full report on the MDP in the library of the House. First, I should put the MDP into context. The 2015 Strategic Defence and Security Review was the right plan for Defence at that time. The Government put the Defence budget on a firmer footing, increasing throughout the life of the Parliament. Defence is much stronger as a result of that. NATO is growing in strength and the UK is a leader. More allies are meeting the 2 per cent spending guideline, or have developed plans to do so. We are the second largest defence spender in NATO, one of only a small number of allies to spend 2 per cent of our GDP on defence, and invest 20 per cent of that in upgrading equipment. We can be proud of what we have achieved since 2015. But we have to also be vigilant. National security challenges have become more complex, intertwined and dangerous since 2015 and these threats are moving much faster than anticipated. Persistent, aggressive state competition now characterises the international security context. In response to the growing threats the MDP was launched in January. And, in the last year, our Armed Forces have demonstrated their growing capability, engaged globally, and supported the prosperity of the UK. The Royal Navy has increased its mass and points of presence around the world. We have taken steps to forward base the Army, enhancing our global posture. The Royal Air Force has continued to innovate, and has celebrated a proud past its RAF100 years since its creation. Progress has also made in cyber and space, as the changing character of warfare makes both domains increasingly important. We have reinforced the UK's position as a leading voice in NATO and on European security. And, our Armed Forces have led the way for Global Britain, tackling our adversaries abroad to protect our security at home and nurturing enduring relationships with our allies and partners. Through the work over the past year the MDP has identified three broad priorities, supported by the additional £1.8 billion invested in Defence. Firstly, we will mobilise, making more of what we already have to make our current force more lethal and better able to protect our security. The UK already has a world-leading array of capabilities. We will make the most effective use of them. We will improve the readiness and availability of a range of key Defence platforms: major warships, attack submarines, helicopters and a range of ISTAR platforms. We are adjusting our overseas training and deployments to increase our global points of presence, better to support allies and influence adversaries. To improve the combat effectiveness of our Force, we will re-prioritise the current Defence programme to increase weapon stockpiles. And we are accelerating work to assure the resilience of our Defence systems and capabilities. We can mobilise a full spectrum of military, economic and soft power capabilities. And, where necessary and appropriate we will make sure we are able to act independently. We will also enhance efforts with our allies and partners, aligning our plans more closely with them, acting as part of combined formations, developing combined capabilities, and burden-sharing. And we continue to invest in, and grow, our global network of Defence personnel and the education and training we offer in the UK and overseas. Secondly, we will modernise, embracing new technologies to assure our competitive edge Our adversaries and competitors are accelerating the development of new capabilities and strategies. We must keep pace, and conceive of our joint force as consisting of five domains, air, land, sea, cyber and space, rather than the traditional three. We must modernise, targeting priority areas. A major new step will involve improved Joint Forces Command that will be in a better position so that defence can play a major role in preventing conflict in the future and improve our cyber operations and capabilities across the armed forces but also across government as well. This year Defence's Innovation Fund put £20 million towards projects in areas including unmanned air systems, virtual reality training, and enhanced digital communications for the Future Commando Force. The fund will grow to £50 million next financial year, increasing the scope, ambition and value of the projects it can support. We will launch new ‘Spearhead' innovation programmes that will apply cutting-edge technologies to areas including sub-surface threats to our submarines, our intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capability, and command and control in the Land Environment as well. And to drive innovation and change through the Department I am launching a Transformation Fund. Next year, I will ring-fence £160 million of MOD's budget to create this fund available for innovative new military capabilities. I will look to make a further £340 million available as part of the Spending Review. This fund will be available for new innovative military capabilities which allows us to stay one step ahead of our adversaries. Together these and other steps will enable the acceleration of our modernisation plans. Thirdly, we will transform, radically changing the way we do business in Defence. We need to improve markedly the way we run Defence. To sustain strategic advantage in a fast-changing world, we must be able and capable of continuous and timely adaptation. We will embrace modern business practices and establish a culture that nurtures transformation and innovation. We also need to create financial headroom for modernisation. Based on our work to date, we expect to achieve over the next decade the very demanding efficiency targets we were set in 2015, including through investment in a programme of digital transformation. We will develop a comprehensive strategy to improve recruitment and retention of talent, better reflecting the expectations of the modern workforce. We will access more effectively the talents of our ‘Whole Force' across all three Services, Regulars, Reserves, Civil Service and industrial partners. Looking ahead, dealing effectively with persistent conflict and competition will increasingly hinge on smarter, better informed long-range strategy. To help achieve these goals we will establish a permanent Net Assessment Unit, as well as a Defence Policy Board of external experts, to bring challenge to Defence policy and to Defence strategy. Our achievements under the MDP have made Defence stronger. The capability investments and policy approaches set out, with the £1.8 billion worth of Defence funding, will help us keep on track to deliver the right UK Defence for the challenging decade ahead. Without a shadow of a doubt, there is more work to be done as we move towards next year's Spending Review. We must sustain this momentum if we are to realise our long-term goals of increasing the lethality, reach and mass of our Armed Forces. I will do everything within my power to make sure that the UK remains a Tier-One military power in the decade ahead, and that we continue to deliver the strong defence and security that has been the hallmark of the government. I commend this statement to the House. The Modernising Defence Programme https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/modernising-defence-programme-update

  • UK: Modernising Defence Programme public consultation

    December 19, 2018 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

    UK: Modernising Defence Programme public consultation

    Detail of outcome The Defence Secretary launched the Modernising Defence Programme in January 2018 with the aim of further strengthening and modernising defence in response to a more complex and challenging international security situation. This report ‘Mobilising, modernising and transforming defence' describes a set of policy approaches and capability investments that will help to keep us on track to deliver the right UK defence for the coming decade. Supported by the additional £1.8 billion funding announced in the Autumn Budget, defence will: mobilise, making more of what we already have to ensure our armed forces are best placed to protect our security modernise, embracing new technologies and assuring our competitive edge over our adversaries transform, radically changing the way we do business and staying ahead of emerging threats As we move towards the 2019 Spending Review, we must sustain this momentum. The Defence Secretary will continue to work with the Prime Minister, the Chancellor and the National Security Council to explore how these aims should be fulfilled alongside our other national security priorities. https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/modernising-defence-programme-public-consultation

  • Missile Defense Agency Awards Lockheed Martin Contract To Design, Manufacture And Construct Homeland Defense Radar-Hawaii

    December 19, 2018 | International, C4ISR

    Missile Defense Agency Awards Lockheed Martin Contract To Design, Manufacture And Construct Homeland Defense Radar-Hawaii

    MOORESTOWN, N.J., Dec. 18, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) was awarded a $585 million contract by the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) to design, develop and deliver its Homeland Defense Radar-Hawaii (HDR-H) in Oahu, Hawaii. The HDR-H radar will provide autonomous acquisition and persistent precision tracking and discrimination to optimize the defensive capability of the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) and counter evolving threats. "Lockheed Martin will leverage the development of our Long Range Discrimination Radar (LRDR) to provide the lowest risk and best value HDR-H solution to MDA, which includes open, scalable architecture for future growth," said Chandra Marshall, program director for Lockheed Martin's Missile Defense Radars market segment. LRDR is currently under construction in Clear, Alaska, and is scheduled for an on-time delivery in 2020. The system's open architecture design will enable future growth to keep pace with emerging threats. "LRDR completed a key milestone in August, successfully searching for, acquiring and tracking numerous satellites, known as a closed loop track, confirming our design is complete, mature and ready for full rate production in 2019," said Marshall. The work for HDR-H will be performed in Moorestown, New Jersey, and Oahu, Hawaii. As a proven world leader in systems integration and development of air and missile defense systems and technologies, Lockheed Martin delivers high-quality missile defense solutions that protect citizens, critical assets and deployed forces from current and future threats. The company's experience spans missile design and production, hit-to-kill capabilities, infrared seekers, command and control/battle management, and communications, precision pointing and tracking optics, radar and signal processing, as well as threat-representative targets for missile defense tests. About Lockheed Martin Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, Lockheed Martin is a global security and aerospace company that employs approximately 100,000 people worldwide and is principally engaged in the research, design, development, manufacture, integration and sustainment of advanced technology systems, products and services. This year the company received three Edison Awards for ground-breaking innovations in autonomy, satellite technology and directed energy. SOURCE Lockheed Martin https://news.lockheedmartin.com/2018-12-18-Missile-Defense-Agency-Awards-Lockheed-Martin-Contract-to-Design-Manufacture-and-Construct-Homeland-Defense-Radar-Hawaii

  • L'observation spatiale nouvelle génération parée au lancement

    December 19, 2018 | International, Aerospace, C4ISR

    L'observation spatiale nouvelle génération parée au lancement

    Helen Chachaty Mise à jour 13h (heure française) : Le lancement est reporté de 24 heures en raison de conditions météorologiques défavorables. L'observation spatiale prend une nouvelle dimension. Le premier satellite CSO (Composante spatiale optique) doit en théorie être mis sur orbite ce 18 décembre par un lanceur Soyouz, depuis le Centre spatial guyanais (CSG) de Kourou. La constellation CSO - composée de trois satellites - remplacera à terme le système Hélios II et reprendra les missions d'observation spatiale pour les forces armées françaises, mais aussi pour les pays partenaires du programme MUSIS (Multinational space-based imaging system). D'une masse de 3,5 tonnes, CSO-1 sera placé sur une orbite héliosynchrone à 800 kilomètres d'altitude et déployé pour des missions de reconnaissance, avec la capacité de produire des images très haute résolution. CSO-3 aura les mêmes fonctions, alors que CSO-2 sera quant à lui placé sur une orbite polaire à une altitude différente, soit 480 kilomètres d'altitude, afin de remplir la mission d'identification. Le deuxième satellite bénéficiera donc d'une résolution augmentée par rapport à CSO-1 et -3 et sera capable de produire des images d'extrêmement haute résolution - une donnée non-dévoilée. CSO-2 sera théoriquement lancé en mai 2020, toujours par Soyouz, CSO-3 devrait quant à lui être tiré par Ariane 6 en octobre 2021. Ces satellites de nouvelle génération représentent un « saut qualitatif en termes de résolution d'image, de précision de localisation et de nombre de prises de vue », explique un aviateur. Les satellites CSO sont destinés à effectuer des prises de vue en fonction des besoins militaires de la France et des pays partenaires (Allemagne, Belgique, Espagne, Italie, Suède). Dotés de capacités multispectrales et infrarouges, les satellites CSO permettront de disposer d'images mono- et stéréoscopiques. La participation de la Suède, qui met à disposition une antenne à Kiruna, permettra par ailleurs au satellite de « décharger » les données toutes les 90 minutes, contre environ deux fois par jour pour l'antenne de la base aérienne de Creil. La capacité journalière maximale est estimée à environ 800 images. La composante spatiale optique est articulée autour des trois satellites, d'un segment sol de mission pour le contrôle des satellites et d'un segment sol utilisateur. CSO-1, -2 et -3 ont été réalisés sous maîtrise d'oeuvre d'Airbus Defence & Space, l'instrumentation optique a été fournie par Thales Alenia Space France. Le segment sol mission est opéré par le CNES depuis Toulouse. Il est composé d'un centre de programmation (Capgemini) et de commande-contrôle (Airbus Defence & Space) et d'un centre d'expertise qualité image (Thales Service et Capgemini). Quant au segment sol utilisateur, situé à Creil, il a été conçu et réalisé par Airbus Defence & Space. La Direction générale de l'armement est responsable de la conduite du programme et assure la maîtrise d'ouvrage du segment sol utilisateur. Elle a délégué au CNES la maîtrise d'ouvrage pour la réalisation des satellites et du segment sol de mission, ainsi que le lancement des satellites - qui sera effectué par Arianespace. Le lancement de CSO-1 intervient alors que la ministre des Armées Florence Parly doit prochainement rendre au président de la République Emmanuel Macron un rapport sur la stratégie spatiale militaire française. « Il faut avoir en tête que l'espace devient le thé'tre de confrontations », avait-elle déclaré à l'occasion d'une rencontre avec des journalistes début septembre, mettant en avant la nécessité de disposer de capacités spatiales efficientes. Florence Parly avait également rappelé que « protéger l'espace, c'est protéger nos opérations. C'est aussi garantir notre souveraineté et trouver l'opportunité de partenariats avec nos alliés européens, et c'est surtout protéger nos modes de vie et notre quotidien ». La Loi de programmation militaire 2019-2025 inclut, outre la mise en oeuvre du programme CSO-MUSIS, la mise en service du programme CERES (Capacité d'écoute et de renseignement électromagnétique spatiale), des deux premiers satellites du système Syracuse IV et le lancement du programme OMEGA (Opération de modernisation des équipements GNSS des armées). Les premières images produites par CSO-1 sont attendues « dans quelques mois », explique-t-on au CMOS (Centre militaire d'observation spatiale). Après le lancement du satellite suivra une période de calibrage des instruments de bord et de calage du télescope et de la structure. https://www.journal-aviation.com/actualites/41584-l-observation-spatiale-nouvelle-generation-paree-au-lancement

  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - December 18, 2018

    December 19, 2018 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - December 18, 2018

    MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY Lockheed Martin Corp., Moorestown, New Jersey, is being awarded a $585,206,351 fixed-price incentive delivery order for the Homeland Defense Radar - Hawaii (HDR-H). The contractor will design, develop, and deliver the HDR-H radar providing autonomous acquisition and persistent precision tracking and discrimination to optimize the defensive capability of the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) and counter evolving threats. This award is the result of a competitively awarded acquisition in which one offer was received. Fiscal 2018 and 2019 research development test and evaluation funds in the amount of $51,389,757 are being obligated at time of award. The work will be performed in Moorestown, New Jersey; and Oahu, Hawaii. The exact location in Oahu, Hawaii, will be determined at the conclusion of the ongoing site selection and National Environmental Policy Act processes. The period of performance is from Dec. 18, 2018, through Dec. 17, 2023. The Missile Defense Agency, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity (HQ0147-19-F-0018). DEFENSE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AGENCY Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Reston, Virginia, was awarded a competitive, single award indefinite-delivery/indefinite–quantity, firm-fixed-price contract for X86 processor capacity services. The total lifecycle amount of the contract is $323,921,060. The minimum guarantee for this effort is $770,000, $675,000 of which is being met by the first delivery order under HC1084-19-F-0001, and is funded by fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds. Performance will be at current Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) data centers or future DISA centers in the continental U.S. (CONUS), DISA outside CONUS (OCONUS) data centers, and other DISA or DISA-approved locations worldwide in which DISA may acquire an operational responsibility. Proposals were solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities websites, and six proposals were received from the proposals solicited. The period of performance is for a base of five years beginning Dec. 19, 2018, and five one-year periods through Dec. 18, 2028. The Defense Information Technology Contracting Organization, Scott AFB, Illinois, is the contracting activity (HC1084-19-D-0002). NAVY General Electric Co., Lynn, Massachusetts, is awarded $290,834,776 for modification P00014 to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N00019-17-C-0047) for the procurement of eight F414-GE-400 install engines for the Navy. In addition, this modification provides for the procurement of 56 F414-GE-400-1A install engines; four F414-GE-400 spare engines; two spare engine containers and 12 spare engine modules for the government of Kuwait. These engines power the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet aircraft. Work will be performed in Lynn, Massachusetts (59 percent); Hooksett, New Hampshire (18 percent); Rutland, Vermont (12 percent); and Madison, Kentucky (11 percent), and is expected to be completed in December 2020. Fiscal 2018 aircraft procurement (Navy); and foreign military sales funds in the amount $290,834,776 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This modification combines purchases for the. Navy ($33,261,704; 11 percent); and the government of Kuwait ($257,573,072; 89 percent) under the Foreign Military Sales program. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, is awarded a $91,720,000 ceiling-priced, cost-plus-fixed-fee, firm-fixed-price contract for the procurement of new aircrew and maintenance training systems, as well as upgrades and modifications to the existing F/A-18E/F and EA-18G aircrew and maintenance training systems to ensure the systems are representative of fleet aircraft and systems and interface with the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Joint Simulation Environment. Work will be performed in St. Louis, Missouri, and is expected to be completed in December 2023. Fiscal 2017 aircraft procurement (Air Force); fiscal 2019 aircraft procurement (Navy); and 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $32,260,000 will be obligated at time of award, $32,097,000 of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This contract combines purchase for the Navy ($90,836,000; 99.03 percent); and the Air Force ($884,000; 0.97 percent). The Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division, Orlando, Florida, is the contracting activity (N6134019D0906). Raytheon Co., McKinney, Texas, is awarded $65,648,632 for firm-fixed-price delivery order N00383-19-F-HC02 under a previously awarded basic ordering agreement (N00383-15-G-005D) for the repair of the Advanced Targeting Forward Looking Infrared system used in support of the F/A-18 aircraft. Work will be performed in McKinney, Texas (77 percent); Jacksonville, Florida (20 percent); and El Segundo, California (3 percent). Work is expected to be completed by December 2020. Working capital funds (Navy) in the full amount of $65,648,632 will be obligated to fund the delivery order and funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. One source was solicited for this non-competitive requirement pursuant to the authority set forth in 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), in accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1, with one offer received. Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity. BAE Systems Information and Electronic Systems Integration Inc., Nashua, New Hampshire, is awarded a $32,396,621 five-year, firm-fixed-price requirements, long-term contract for the repair of 103 items of the ALQ-126B electronic countermeasures systems and two items of the ALE-55 radio frequency countermeasure system to support countermeasures for various aircraft. Work will be performed in Nashua, New Hampshire (47 percent); Jacksonville, Florida (48 percent); and Crane, Indiana (5 percent). Work is expected to be completed by December 2023. Working capital funds (Navy) will be obligated as individual task orders are issued and funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was a sole-source pursuant to the authority set forth in 10 U.S. Code 2304(C)(1) and Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1, with one offer received. Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity (N00383-19-D-UA01). Rockwell Collins Inc., Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is awarded $14,915,670 for modification P00004 to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N00421-18-D-0004) to exercise additional contract line item numbers under Option Year I for the manufacture and delivery of additional quantities of the AN/ARC-210 family of radio equipment in support of Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Foreign Military Sales customers. Work will be performed in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and is expected to be completed in September 2021. No funds will be obligated at time of award. Funds will be obligated on individual orders as they are issued. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Raytheon Missile Systems, Tucson, Arizona, is awarded $11,740,000 for not-to-exceed delivery order N0001919F2610 against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00019-15-G-0003) for the Navy and Air Force. This order provides for non-recurring engineering for the redesign of the Control Actuation System electronic controller and the requalification of the dimeryl diisocyanate utilized in the AIM-9X Sidewinder Block I/II/II+ missiles. Work will be performed in Santa Clarita, California (48 percent); Rocket Center, West Virginia (33 percent); and Tucson, Arizona (19 percent), and is expected to be completed in March 2021. Fiscal 2019 weapons procurement (Navy); and fiscal 2019 missile procurement (Air Force) funds in the amount of $3,471,918 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This order combines purchases for the Navy ($5,870,000; 50 percent); and the Air Force ($5,870,000; 50 percent). The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. L3 Adaptive Methods, Centreville, Virginia, is awarded a $7,674,780 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to a previously awarded contract (N00024-15-C-5220) to exercise an option for the accomplishment of services for the Undersea Warfare and Surface Warfare command and control systems. The services include systems engineering, program management, software development, risk management, prototype development, information assurance, training, and integrated logistics support. Work will be performed in Centreville, Virginia (50 percent); and Keyport, Washington (50 percent), and is expected to be completed by December 2019. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test, and evaluation (Navy); and fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) funding in the amount of $4,279,000 will be obligated at time of award and funding in the amount of $420,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. AIR FORCE Raytheon Missile Systems, Tucson, Arizona, has been awarded a $141,447,329 firm-fixed-price contract (FA8672-19-C-0010) to exercise an option to previously awarded contract FA8672-10-C-0002 for Small Diameter Bomb (SDB) II. The contractor will provide low-rate initial production for 1,260 SDB II Lot Five munitions, 389 single-weapon containers, 344 dual-weapon containers, 20 production reliability incentive demonstration effort captive vehicles, 20 production reliability incentive demonstration effort tests, 36 weapon load crew trainers/conventional munitions maintenance trainers and data. Work will be performed in Tucson, Arizona, and is expected to be completed by June 30, 2022. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition resulting from follow-on to competition. Fiscal 2019 missile procurement funds in the amount of $141,447,329 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, is the contracting activity. Lockheed Martin Space, Sunnyvale, California, has been awarded a $7,394,373 modification (P00063) to contract FA808-12-C-0010 for Advanced Extremely High Frequency satellite vehicles 5/6. The contract modification is for Space Vehicle 5 Liquid Apogee Engine (LAE) 4-corners testing request for equitable adjustment. Work for this effort is complete. The testing of the LAE engine took place in Tokyo, Japan, the removal and replacement took place in Sunnyvale, California. Fiscal 2017 missile procurement funds will fund the contract. Total cumulative face value of the contract is $2,032,081,111. Space and Missile Systems Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base, California, is the contracting activity. ARMY M.A. Mortenson Co., doing business as Mortenson Construction, Minneapolis, Minnesota, was awarded a $36,298,000 firm-fixed-price contract to design and construct a 61,515 square foot administrative facility including administrative spaces, classrooms, and secure spaces. Bids were solicited via the internet with six received. Work will be performed in Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado, with an estimated completion date of March 10, 2021. Fiscal 2018 military construction funds in the amount of $36,298,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha, Nebraska, is the contracting activity (W9128F-19-C-0006). DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Michelin North America Inc., Greenville, South Carolina, has been awarded a maximum $26,289,870 fixed-price, indefinite-delivery, requirements contract for aircraft tires supporting the Global Tire Program. This is a three-year contract with no option periods. Location of performance is South Carolina, with a Dec. 17, 2021, performance completion date. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2021 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Land and Maritime, Columbus, Ohio (SPE7LX-19-D-0046). Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron, Ohio, has been awarded a maximum $24,047,839 fixed-price, indefinite-delivery, requirements contract for aircraft tires supporting the Global Tire Program. This was a competitive acquisition with two offers received. This is a three-year contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Ohio, with a Dec. 17, 2021, performance completion date. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2021 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Land and Maritime, Columbus, Ohio (SPE7LX-19-D-0045). The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, has been awarded a maximum $17,040,935 firm-fixed-price delivery order (SPRPA1-18-F-0003) against a five-year basic ordering agreement (SPRPA1-14-D-002U) for F/A-18 depot level repairable parts support. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a four-year, four-month contract with no option periods. Locations of performance are Missouri, California, Florida and North Carolina, with an April 18, 2023, performance completion date. Using military service is Navy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2023 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Raytheon Co., McKinney, Texas, has been awarded a maximum $9,549,053 firm-fixed-price contract for 128 display control modules for the Abrams tank. This was a sole source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a two-year base contract with one six-month option period. The option is being exercised at the time of award. Location of performance is Texas, with an April 30, 2021, performance completion date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Land and Maritime, Warren, Michigan (SPRDL1-19-C-0070). Tennier Industries Inc.,* Delray Beach, Florida, has been awarded a $9,309,281 modification (P00007) to a one-year contract (SPE1C1-17-D-1090) with two one-year option periods for various parkas. This is a fixed-price contract. Locations of performance are Florida and Tennessee, with a Dec. 19, 2019, performance completion date. Using military services are Marine Corps and Air Force. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2020 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. DEFENSE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY General Dynamics Mission Systems, Inc., San Antonio, Texas, has been awarded a $24,916,847 modification (P00036) to previously awarded contract HR0011-16-C-0001 for classified information technology services. The modification brings the total cumulative face value of the contract to $105,016,388 from $80,099,541. Work will be performed in Arlington, Virginia, with an expected completion date of February 2020. Fiscal 2018 and 2019 research and development funds in the amount of $20,949,939 are being obligated at time of award. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Arlington, Virginia, is the contracting activity. *Small business https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1717218/source/GovDelivery/

  • Maxar's MDA and Orbital Insight Announce Expanded SAR Satellite Imagery Agreement

    December 18, 2018 | Local, Aerospace, C4ISR

    Maxar's MDA and Orbital Insight Announce Expanded SAR Satellite Imagery Agreement

    Orbital Insight will use MDA high-resolution imagery to strengthen oil inventory product RICHMOND, BC and PALO ALTO, CA, Dec. 17, 2018 /CNW/ - MDA, a Maxar Technologies company (NYSE: MAXR) (TSX: MAXR), and Orbital Insight, a leading provider of geospatial analytics, today announced the latest agreement providing new datasets for Orbital Insight's product offerings. MDA will provide high-resolution imagery from its RADARSAT-2 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite to Orbital Insight, which will process and transform the data into actionable intelligence for the energy industry. "Building on an already strong relationship with a second Orbital Insight contract award, MDA will provide valuable insight into energy supply chains by enabling timely, reliable imaging of global oil storage sites, regardless of cloud cover," said Mike Greenley, group president of MDA. "This solution reinforces the unique and powerful combination of RADARSAT-2's large imaging capacity and timely data delivery, with Orbital Insight's geospatial analytics capabilities, to grow the market for information derived from SAR imagery." MDA's RADARSAT-2 has global monitoring capabilities, including a large collection capacity and high-resolution radar imaging. The satellite acquires data regardless of light or weather conditions, due to its active imaging mechanism. As a result, RADARSAT-2 provides an accurate and reliable source of information about ground activity such as changes in oil tank inventories. Orbital Insight will use the imagery to create oil inventory information that is incorporated into its energy products, which include the Global Geospatial Crude Index, a single number that objectively captures global crude inventory insights on a daily basis. Orbital Insight's customers use the Global Geospatial Crude Index to make economic decisions with confidence in global energy markets. "Having access to cutting-edge datasets strengthens our product offerings, so we're pleased to deepen our relationship with MDA as a key imagery provider," said Dr. James Crawford, founder and CEO of Orbital Insight. "SAR imagery is valuable because it provides information even if conditions on the ground aren't visible due to weather or lighting. Expanding this partnership delivers direct customer value." This new contract expands Orbital Insight's relationship with Maxar Technologies. The geospatial analytics firm also has a multi-year partnership with DigitalGlobe focused on high-resolution electro-optical satellite imagery and DigitalGlobe's Geospatial Big Data platform (GBDX). Orbital Insight refines its analytic capabilities using DigitalGlobe's satellite imagery at petabyte-scale on GBDX, revealing insights for industry use cases such as estimating harvest yields, making more accurate retail predictions, and monitoring global energy and natural resource markets. About MDA MDA is an internationally recognized leader in space robotics, space sensors, satellite payloads, antennas and subsystems, surveillance and intelligence systems, defence and maritime systems, and geospatial radar imagery. MDA's extensive space expertise and heritage translates into mission-critical defence and commercial applications that include multi-platform command, control and surveillance systems, aeronautical information systems, land administration systems and terrestrial robotics. MDA is also a leading supplier of actionable mission-critical information and insights derived from multiple data sources. Founded in 1969, MDA is recognized as one of Canada's most successful technology ventures with locations in Richmond, Ottawa, Brampton, Montreal, Halifax and the United Kingdom. MDA is a Maxar Technologies company (TSX: MAXR; NYSE: MAXR). For more information, visit www.mdacorporation.com. About Maxar Technologies As a global leader of advanced space technology solutions, Maxar Technologies (formerly MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates) is at the nexus of the new space economy, developing and sustaining the infrastructure and delivering the information, services, systems that unlock the promise of space for commercial and government markets. As a trusted partner, Maxar Technologies provides vertically integrated capabilities and expertise including satellites, Earth imagery, robotics, geospatial data and analytics to help customers anticipate and address their most complex mission-critical challenges with confidence. With more than 6,500 employees in over 30 global locations, the Maxar Technologies portfolio of commercial space brands includes MDA, SSL, DigitalGlobe and Radiant Solutions. Every day, billions of people rely on Maxar to communicate, share information and data, and deliver insights that Build a Better World. Maxar trades on the Toronto Stock Exchange and New York Stock Exchange as MAXR. For more information, visit www.maxar.com. About Orbital Insight Orbital Insight develops geospatial analytics to help its clients unlock societal and economic trends at a global scale. The company works with petabytes of geospatial data, including imagery from satellites, drones and other sources. Using computer vision and machine learning technologies, it processes and transforms this data to enable businesses, governments and NGOs to make better decisions. Learn why Fast Company voted Orbital Insight one of the most innovative companies of 2017 and 2018 at www.orbitalinsight.com. Forward-Looking Statements Certain statements and other information included in this release constitute "forward-looking information" or "forward-looking statements" (collectively, "forward-looking statements") under applicable securities laws. Statements including words such as "may", "will", "could", "should", "would", "plan", "potential", "intend", "anticipate", "believe", "estimate" or "expect" and other words, terms and phrases of similar meaning are often intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. Forward-looking statements involve estimates, expectations, projections, goals, forecasts, assumptions, risks and uncertainties, as well as other statements referring to or including forward-looking information included in this release. Forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties which could cause actual results to differ materially from the anticipated results or expectations expressed in this release. As a result, although management of the Company believes that the expectations and assumptions on which such forward-looking statements are based are reasonable, undue reliance should not be placed on the forward-looking statements because the Company can give no assurance that they will prove to be correct. The risks that could cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations include, but are not limited to, the risk factors and other disclosures about the Company and its business included in the Company's continuous disclosure materials filed from time to time with Canadian and U.S. securities regulatory authorities, which are available online under the Company's SEDAR profile at www.sedar.com, under the Company's EDGAR profile at www.sec.gov or on the Company's website at www.maxar.com. The forward-looking statements contained in this release are expressly qualified in their entirety by the foregoing cautionary statements. All such forward-looking statements are based upon data available as of the date of this release or other specified date and speak only as of such date. The Company disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements in this release as a result of new information or future events, except as may be required under applicable securities legislation. Contact Wendy Keyzer | MDA Media Contact | 1-604-231-2743 | wendy.keyzer@mdacorporation.com Jason Gursky | Maxar Investor Relations | 1-303-684-2207 | jason.gursky@maxar.com SOURCE Maxar Technologies Ltd. Related Links www.maxar.com https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/maxars-mda-and-orbital-insight-announce-expanded-sar-satellite-imagery-agreement-702924451.html

  • Government of Canada announces contract awards aimed at improving space-based earth observation capabilities

    December 18, 2018 | Local, Aerospace, C4ISR

    Government of Canada announces contract awards aimed at improving space-based earth observation capabilities

    Backgrounder December 14, 2018 – Ottawa, Ontario – National Defence/Canadian Armed Forces Already a leader in civilian radar earth observation as a result of the launch of RADARSAT-2 in 2007, Canada will soon launch the three-satellite RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM). This mission will carry a multi-mode synthetic aperture radar and an automatic identification system to enable enhanced ship tracking and provide greater awareness of Canada's territories as well as other areas of interest around the world where DND and its Allies operate. In order to enhance Canada's current and future earth observation capabilities, research and development is required to generate new approaches and tools to simplify and accelerate the tasking, collection, processing, exploitation and dissemination (TCPED) cycle. This cycle ensures that end-users have timely, relevant, accurate and actionable information products, such as maps and reports to support intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) applications. This type of Canadian investment in cutting-edge science and technology (S&T) innovations will guide the design of new advanced earth observation satellites that will eventually replace the RCM. The All Domain Situational Awareness (ADSA) S&T Program has funded several calls for proposals to support innovation including in the area of compressing TCPED cycle for earth observing satellites in support of applications in intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. A recent ADSA call was undertaken through the Defence Innovation Research Program (DIRP) and resulted in the Government of Canada investing $6.7 million into 12 projects aimed at improving the TCPED cycle. Structured as 50/50 cost-shared contracts with funding shared equally between government and industry, the DIRP model promotes joint ventures between Canada's innovation industry and the Government of Canada, bringing the total public and private investment under this call for proposals to $13.2 million. The following are the contracts awarded under the second DIRP call for proposals for the TCPED initiative. Title Complementary Electro-Optic/Infrared (EO/IR) payload to RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM) follow-on Supplier ABB Location Quebec, Quebec Project Type Study Federal contribution $305,000 (Total: $610,000) This project aims to help define mission objectives, requirements, and concepts for a secondary electro-optic/infrared payload for the RCM follow-on mission. It will also help identify critical technologies and risks. The combination of different types of remote sensing sensors on the same spacecraft has the potential to greatly enhance situational awareness capabilities especially with respect to maritime traffic monitoring. Title Project Arviq Supplier AstroCom Associates Inc. Location Ottawa, Ontario Project Type Study Federal contribution $165,000 (Total: $330,000) Project Arviq will investigate the feasibility of a proposed capability to detect ocean waves in sea ice. Arviq builds upon recent results that show centimetre-scale ice waves can be imaged directly using synthetic aperture radar interferometry technology. Title Multi-satellite data integration for operational ship detection, identification and tracking Supplier C-CORE Location St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador Project Type Study Federal contribution $775,000 (Total: $1,550,000) This study will investigate and develop a multi-satellite data classifying approach to enhance the capacity to discriminate ships from icebergs. Efficiently and rapidly classifying detected objects of interest in or over water is a key area of interest to the maritime domain situational awareness community. Title Modelling the geospatial intelligence capability to support Canadian surveillance and sovereignty Supplier C-CORE Location St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador Project Type Study Federal contribution $940,000 (Total: $1,880,000) This project will evaluate the spatio-temporal aspects of acquiring, downlinking and analyzing imagery for the generation of geographical intelligence products in support of land and maritime monitoring. It will investigate and develop a multi-satellite data classifier to better characterize ship and non-ship targets. Title Electro-Optic/Infrared data analytics for enhanced maritime surveillance Supplier Complex System Inc. Location Calgary, Alberta Project Type Study and prototype development Federal contribution $200,000 (Total: $400,000) This project will develop an on-board video processing system which will be used together with space-based radar and ship dectection sensors to enhance near-real time vessel detection, tracking and identification. Complex Systems Inc. will develop a new data analytics system by leveraging leading edge computer vision and machine learning technologies and deliver a suite of advanced processing tools enabling enhancing maritime surveillance capabilities. Title RADARSAT thematic exploitation platform demonstrator Supplier CubeWerx Inc. Location Gatineau, QC Project Type Study Federal contribution $485,000 (Total: $970,000) This project will study complementary Big Data and Cloud computing approaches to support scalability, agility, and on-demand availability of earth observation data products. CubeWerx will develop a RADARSAT thematic exploitation platform and demonstrate a working environment where users can package their applications and upload them to a Cloud environment that supports the processing of users algorithms at scale, avoiding the need to download and store large volumes of images locally. Title Real-time processing of large-volume space-based multimodal data Supplier General Dynamics Mission Systems Location Ottawa, Ontario Project Type Study and prototype development Federal contribution $75,000 ($150,000) This project will develop new approaches using emerging graphics processing unit architectures and the latest algorithms to process large volumes of satellite remote sensing data from multiple sources and types such as multiband radar, electro-optical and infrared sensors. Title Augmenting Canada's maritime surveillance capability with complementary electro-optic/infrared information products Supplier MDA Systems Ltd. Location Richmond, British Columbia Project Type Study and prototype development Federal contribution $1,000,000 (Total: $2,000,000) This project will demonstrate how incorporating various types of space remote sensing satellite data elements can augment maritime surveillance capabilities with additional detections and improve classification, identification, and tracking. Title Application of Big Data analytics techniques to extracting GEOINT from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery Supplier MDA Geospatial Services Inc. Location Richmond, British Columbia Project Type Study Federal contribution $500,000 (Total: $1,000,000) This project will investigate Big Data analytics and automatization techniques to better exploit the large and growing data archives of RADARSAT-2 and the upcoming RADARSAT Constellation Mission (RCM). It proposes to understand and demonstrate how Big Data analytics, in particular deep learning, can be applied to large archives of synthetic aperture radar imagery to extract relevant geospatial intelligence. Title Persistent multi-sensor land surveillance and change monitoring Supplier MDA Systems Ltd. Location Richmond, British Columbia Project Type Study Federal contribution $750,000 (Total: $1,500,000) This project will explore how wide-area automated change monitoring techniques can be enhanced by using a combination of earth observing data types such as RADARSAT and electro-optical data. The expected benefits include more persistent, more operational, all-weather monitoring capabilities combined with very high change classification accuracy. The project will leverage deep learning and exploit the availability of large satellite image archives. Title Architecture innovations for analytics-ready data Supplier UrtheCast Corp. Location Vancouver, British Columbia Project Type Study and prototype development Federal contribution $1,000,000 (Total: $2,000,000) This project will demonstrate scalable warehousing and on-demand processing of analytics-ready space remote sensing data from multiple types of earth obervation systems, to enable emerging techniques including artificial intelligence to be used for the production of geographical information products. Title Complementary sensor exploitation Supplier UrtheCast Corp. Location Vancouver, British Columbia Project Type Study and prototype development Federal contribution $499,000 (Total: $999,000) This project will develop, implement and demonstrate a new system to deliver thematic maps derived from complementary satellite earth observation data sources in support of CAF land operations. https://www.canada.ca/en/department-national-defence/news/2018/12/government-of-canada-announces-contract-awards-aimed-at-improving-space-based-earth-observation-capabilities.html

  • The military could save hundreds of billions — by capping pay, scrapping aircraft, slashing benefits, experts say

    December 18, 2018 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR

    The military could save hundreds of billions — by capping pay, scrapping aircraft, slashing benefits, experts say

    By: Leo Shane III WASHINGTON — Analysts from the Congressional Budget Office say the government could trim hundreds of billions from the federal deficit by enacting a host of already discussed military and veterans program reforms. The problem is that those reforms include some of the most controversial and politically unpopular policies of the last few years, things like limiting military pay raises, ending a host of military equipment purchases, and cutting back on veterans benefits. The document released last week — CBO's annual “options for reducing the deficit” report — lists more than 120 ideas to reduce federal spending or boost federal revenues over the next 10 years. Authors said the goal is to “reflect a range of possibilities” of moves that lawmakers could make in dealing with government debt and escalating federal programming costs. Twenty of the proposals would affect the departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs, including a plan to cut the Pentagon budget by 10 percent ($591 billion in reduced budget authority over the next decade). That dramatic cut would “require DOD to decrease the size of its forces, slow the rate at which it modernizes weapon systems, or do both,” which in turn would prompt a host of complaints from military leaders and defense lawmakers. Still, the size of the savings involved show why the ideas continue to attract debate on Capitol Hill each year, even with the significant disruptions they may bring. Here is a look at some of the other potential VA and Pentagon moves: Limit pay raises for troops ($18 billion in savings over 10 years) The CBO idea would give troops an annual raise of 0.5 percent less than the expected growth in civilian salaries. Service members would still see annual raises, but opponents of the idea argue that those increases wouldn't keep up with the cost of living for military families. President Barack Obama's Pentagon capped the military raises at this level for three years during his presidency, leading to criticism from advocates that he had created a new gap in military and civilian wages. President Donald Trump suggested a 0.3 percent reduction in the expected raise formula in his first budget, but saw the proposal rejected by Congress. Narrow eligibility for VA disability benefits ($33 billion over 10 years) The CBO plan would drop a host of conditions not directly related to military service — illnesses like arteriosclerotic heart disease, hemorrhoids and multiple sclerosis — from the list of claims eligible for disability benefits. More than 750,000 veterans' checks would be affected by the move. Any such trims in benefits have prompted harsh attacks from veterans groups, who have accused supporters of breaking faith with men and women who were promised lifelong assistance for their military service. Cancel new F-35 purchases ($16 billion over 10 years), retire the F-22 fleet ($30 billion over 10 years) and delay development of the B-21 bomber until after 2028 ($45 billion over 10 years) All three ideas would require Air Force officials to continue using aging aircraft, a concern for Pentagon planners who have seen a spike in aviation accidents in recent years. The CBO report acknowledged that a disadvantage of the idea would be making the military “less flexible against advanced enemy air defense systems” but said the current mix of aircraft types already in use by the services would mitigate some of those concerns. Stop building Ford-class aircraft carriers ($18 billion over 10 years) Under this option, the Navy would stop building new aircraft carriers after the USS Enterprise, scheduled to be completed in 2027. A carrier set for the start of construction in 2023 would be scrapped. The CBO report argues that even with the move, the Navy would still have 11 active carriers until 2036 given its current fleet size. However, defense lawmakers have long argued against any delays in ship building schedules, given the long wait for construction and fielding of new vessels. End VA's Individual Unemployability program for retirement-age veterans ($48 billion over 10 years) Trump also suggested this idea in his first VA budget, only to have lawmakers and veterans groups soundly reject it. The IU program provides extra benefits to veterans unable to work because of disabilities, even if they don't have a 100 percent disabled rating. Supporters have argued that money should stop once Social Security payouts begin. Opponents of the idea could leave as many as 235,000 veterans in dire financial need. Reduce military housing allowances to 80 percent of rent costs ($15 billion over 10 years) Under this plan, BAH payments wouldn't change for troops until they move, but it would slowly increase their out-of-pocket costs for housing. The change would also create savings for the VA, since post-9/11 GI Bill housing stipends are tied to the military housing formula. Similar BAH reform proposals on Capitol Hill have met fierce opposition in recent years. Advocates argue that since military members have little say in their next duty assignment, they shouldn't have to shoulder the costs of unexpected moves and expensive housing costs. Replace thousands of troops with civilian workers ($17 billion over 10 years) The CBO idea calls for reducing military end strength by 80,000 over four years and replacing them with 64,000 civilian employees. The work would not be directly related to warfighting, and the health care and ancillary costs of non-military workers would create significant savings compared to service members' benefits. But Congress has worked to increase the military's end strength in recent years, saying it brings more readiness and flexibility to the overall force. An end-strength cut of that size would represent a major political backtrack for many elected officials. https://www.militarytimes.com/news/pentagon-congress/2018/12/17/analysts-find-hundreds-of-billions-in-military-savings-by-capping-military-pay-scrapping-aircraft-slashing-veterans-benefits

Shared by members

  • Share a news article with the community

    It’s very easy, simply copy/paste the link in the textbox below.

Subscribe to our newsletter

to not miss any news from the industry

You can customize your subscriptions in the confirmation email.