Back to news

September 10, 2018 | International, Naval

Shipbuilder eyeing Portland or Seattle to build the Army’s navy

PORTLAND, Ore. — A shipbuilding company with a $1 billion contract with the U.S. Army is choosing between Portland and Seattle to set up a production line for new landing vessels.

The Oregonian/OregonLive reports Portland-based Vigor Industrial says it's planning to make the decision within the next 60 days.

The company says the chosen city is expected to get up to 300 new jobs that are slated to last a decade. The company is contracted to build as many as 36 landing vessels with improved maneuverability and stability.

The company is building a prototype of the landing craft in Seattle. It plans to start full production within three years.

https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-navy/2018/09/07/shipbuilder-eyeing-portland-or-seattle-to-build-the-armys-little-navy

On the same subject

  • Pentagon seeks $104.29 billion military research budget for 2020 -- an increase of 8.7 percent

    August 19, 2019 | International, C4ISR

    Pentagon seeks $104.29 billion military research budget for 2020 -- an increase of 8.7 percent

    WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) is asking Congress for an 8.7 percent increase in the military's research and development budget next year, in what would be a major boost for crucial enabling technologies in communications, surveillance, computers, electronic warfare (EW), electro-optics, and related electronics technologies. By John Keller WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) is asking Congress for an 8.7 percent increase in the military research and development budget next year, in what would be a major boost for crucial enabling technologies in communications, surveillance, computers, electronic warfare (EW), electro-optics, and related electronics technologies. DOD officials are asking for $104.29 billion for electronics-rich research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E) projects in the department's fiscal 2020 budget request, which was released this week. That's up 8.7 percent from the $95.96 billion DOD researchers received this year. Federal fiscal year 2020 begins next Oct. 1. The research budget typically is heavy in technology development, and is where the Pentagon pays for electronics technologies considered to be critical for tomorrow's weapon systems. Of this RDT&E request, the U.S. Air Force is asking for $46.07 billion; defense agencies for $25.17 billion; the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps for $20.43 billion; and the U.S. Army for $12.4 billion. This represents a plus-up for each service branch over this year: 11 percent for the Air Force; 4.6 percent for defense agencies; 9.5 percent for the Navy and Marine Corps; and 9 percent for the Army. The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), one of the Pentagon's premiere research organizations, would receive a 3.8 percent increase in 2020, increasing from $3.43 billion to $3.56 billion. In applied research in 2020, DARPA is asking for $512.4 million for network-centric warfare technologies -- an 18.1 percent increase; $232.1 million for command, control, and communications systems -- a 24.8 percent increase; $163.9 million for sensor technologies -- an 11.7 percent reduction; and $128.6 million for advanced electronics technologies -- a 15.8 percent increase. In basic research DARPA is asking for $442.6 million for information and communications technologies -- a 9.3 percent increase; $337.6 million for tactical technology -- a 9.1 percent increase; and $332.2 million for electronics technology -- a 5 percent reduction. In other defense agencies, the U.S. Missile Defense Agency (MDA) in 2020 is asking for $7.25 billion -- a 1.7 percent increase. In advanced technology development, MDA is asking for $1.16 billion for the ballistic missile defense midcourse defense segment -- a 44 percent increase; $727.5 million for Aegis shipboard ballistic missile defense -- an 18.7 percent reduction; $571.5 million for ballistic missile defense enabling programs -- an 8.6 percent reduction; and $564.2 million for ballistic missile defense command and control -- an 11.1 percent increase. The Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) is asking for $5.29 billion for research and development in 2020 -- a 10.2 percent reduction; the Chemical and Biological Defense program is asking for $1.05 billion -- a 5.4 percent increase; the U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) is asking for $820.3 million -- a 34 percent increase; and the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is asking for $542.9 million -- a 92.4 percent increase. In Special Operations Command advanced technology development programs, SOCOM is asking for $245.8 million for aviation systems -- a 39.8 percent increase; $167.6 million for operational enhancements -- a 62.8 percent increase; $72.6 million for maritime systems -- a 71 percent increase; $68.3 million for warrior systems -- a 9.1 percent reduction; $42.4 million for unmanned intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) -- a 6.1 percent reduction; and $20.7 million for the MQ-9 Reaper surveillance and attack unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) -- a 12.5 percent increase. https://www.militaryaerospace.com/computers/article/16721966/pentagon-seeks-10429-billion-military-research-budget-for-2020-an-increase-of-87-percent

  • With a second frigate yard competition on the horizon, Austal USA moves to add steel shipbuilding

    March 30, 2021 | International, Naval

    With a second frigate yard competition on the horizon, Austal USA moves to add steel shipbuilding

    Austal broke ground in March on a new facility that could make it a contender as a second shipyard for the Navy's new Constellation-class frigate program.

  • Without change, US Navy’s future fleet looks too ambitious for industry

    April 11, 2024 | International, Land

    Without change, US Navy’s future fleet looks too ambitious for industry

    Opinion: For industry to execute the plans in the Future Years Defense Program, major improvements will have to take place.

All news