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November 17, 2021 | Local, Security

Opinion: Climate change is increasing global security threats. Canada can help

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has proposed establishing a NATO Centre of Excellence on Climate and Security in Canada to develop practical applications for climate mitigation

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-climate-change-is-increasing-global-security-threats-canada-can-help/

On the same subject

  • Drone drops of drugs and weapons are getting more common at Ontario prisons

    August 25, 2020 | Local, Aerospace, Security

    Drone drops of drugs and weapons are getting more common at Ontario prisons

    Flying a drone to drop drugs and weapons inside a prison seems like something out of an action movie — yet it happened this month near Toronto and in the last few years, the problem continues to get worse. Warkworth Institution, a medium-security prison about two hours east of Toronto, found drugs, tattoo paraphernalia, handmade weapons and drug paraphernalia in a search of the facility, which ended on Aug. 21. The items were thought to have been brought in via a drone. This isn’t the first time contraband items have entered Canadian corrections facilities. Drones dropped weapons and phones in a Kingston prison earlier this year. In June four people were arrested in a drone plot to smuggle drugs and weapons into a Kingston prison. The Canadian government has been working on solving the issue and planned to spend $6 million on a pilot drone detection program at several institutions. The project has been delayed after the contract was cancelled in January 2020, Veronique Rioux, a spokesperson for Correctional Service Canada (CSC) told blogTO in an email.  While drone sightings over Canadian correctional facilities have increased over the past several years, Rioux said they don’t have a big impact on the number of drugs in correctional institutions. “The use of drones as a method to introduce drugs into correctional institutions is one of many methods used by drug traffickers in an attempt to circumvent CSC's drug interdiction efforts,” she said. For security purposes, Rioux said she cannot say how many items are smuggled through drones or how the drones are used. But they are working to stop contraband items from entering through searches of offenders, visitors, staff, cells, vehicles, buildings and cells with ion scanners and detector dogs. “CSC continues to research and introduce new technology as it becomes available to better facilitate the detection of contraband, including drone detection,” Rioux said. https://www.blogto.com/city/2020/08/drugs-weapons-drone-ontario-prison/

  • Defence Procurement’s Effectiveness Dissected at Ottawa Conference

    November 25, 2019 | Local, Other Defence

    Defence Procurement’s Effectiveness Dissected at Ottawa Conference

    By James Careless How well is Canada’s defence procurement actually working, and are industry-boosters like ITBs paying off? These and other questions were tackled at the ‘Defence in the 43rd Parliament’ one-day conference on November 20, 2019. It was staged by the Canadian Global Affairs Institute (CGAI) at the Chateau Laurier hotel, before a full house in the Adam Room. During the opening session, ‘Canadian Defence Procurement – The State of the Union’, DND Associate Deputy Minister Claude Rochette was cautiously upbeat about the state of Canadian defence procurements. In the last year, DND has signed about 12,000 contracts and spent about $6 billion on procurements, he said. Most of these contracts were on time and on budget. 2019's defence procurement spending is up from $4.9 billion spent by DND in 2016, Rochette noted. In addition, this year DND will “close out its budget” by spending its allocated funds, he said. Despite some criticisms that Canadian defence procurements are not moving fast enough, “we are doing pretty well,” said Claude Rochette. But the process isn’t perfect, he admitted. “We have more work to do.” Rochette’s positive assessment was echoed by PSPC Associate Deputy Minister Michael Vandergrift. 2019 “has been a very busy time” in Canadian defence procurement, he said, During the past year, the federal government issued an RfP for the Future Fighter Capability project; sole-sourced Light Armoured Vehicles from General Dynamics Land Systems-Canada; and selected Lockheed Martin to built 15 Canadian Surface Combatant ships. Asked which defence procurements are going well and which are posing challenges, Rochette replied that smaller projects that fall within DND’s $5 million spending authority are easy to manage. Where issues crop up is in large multi-million dollar projects with long time lines: Trying to cost them accurately and manage them effectively is akin to asking, “I want to have a car and buy it next year, so tell me how much I’ll pay for it (right now),” he said. In a later morning session entitled, ‘Offsets – Is the ITB Policy Delivering?’, the panel considered the impact of procurement bidders ‘overcommitting’ to ITBs (promising financial benefits worth more than the contracts they are bidding for) on the Canadian defence industry. Such ITB overcommittments, which can be worth 300% or more than the contract being sought, are “introducing unnecessary risk” in the Canadian defence industry, said Rich Foster, Vice President of L3 Harris Technologies - Canada. The result of overcommitting is that contractors are “now focussed more on quantity than quality” in making their procurement decisions, he said. The real victims of ITB overcommittments are SMEs, which lack the resources available to large companies to pay for these big ITBs. The choice facing these SMEs is to directly/indirectly seek such contracts – which can run 20-40 years – “or you go out of business,” said Brian Botting, Director of Strategic Offsets at General Dynamics Missions Systems. “It is a terrible dilemma for them to be in.” The CGAI procurement conference ended with the panel discussion, ‘Defence Procurement Canada’. This is the name of the integrated procurement agency the Liberals proposed during the October 2019 election, to replace the multiple ministries currently sharing this responsibility. The common sense reason for having a single defence procurement agency comes down to human nature: “If you ask two of your kids to take out the garbage, it won’t get done,” quipped Alan Williams, President of The Williams Group. “If you ask one of your kids, maybe it will get taken out.” He explained that sharing procurement among ministries causes requires agreement between multiple ministers and deputy ministers – which wastes time -- and that Canada’s military allies manage their procurements through single agencies. Creating a separate Defence Procurement Canada (DPC) agency would not be easy, said Jim Mitchell, Research Associate with the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. Speaking from his own government experience, Mitchell observed that such changes are “disruptive, costly, difficult, hard on people, and hurt efficiency and effectiveness for a few years.” Mitchell added that creating DPC would not prevent Treasury Board and other ministries from having a role in defence procurement afterwards. CGAI Fellow Gavin Liddy was just as pessimistic about the value of creating DPC when so many defence procurements are underway. If the government wants “to do one single thing to delay the procurement agenda in the next five to seven years,” then they should instruct defence bureaucrats to create the DPC, Liddy concluded. “Nothing would divert their attention more than doing that.” http://www.canadiandefencereview.com/news?news/2765

  • Government of Canada receives proposals to replace its fighter jets

    August 3, 2020 | Local, Aerospace

    Government of Canada receives proposals to replace its fighter jets

    NEWS PROVIDED BY Public Services and Procurement Canada  Jul 31, 2020, 12:49 ET GATINEAU, QC, July 31, 2020 /CNW/ - The Government of Canada is committed to providing members of the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) with the aircraft they need to do their jobs, while ensuring the best possible value for Canadians.   Today marked a significant milestone in the process to replace Canada's fighter aircraft fleet. In response to the formal Request for Proposals released last summer, the following eligible suppliers have submitted proposals: Swedish Government—SAAB AB (publ)—Aeronautics with Diehl Defence GmbH & Co. KG, MBDA UK Ltd., and RAFAEL Advanced Defence Systems Ltd. United States Government—Lockheed Martin Corporation (Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company) with Pratt & Whitney United States Government—The Boeing Company with Peraton Canada Corp., CAE Inc., L3 Technologies MAS Inc., GE Canada and Raytheon Canada Limited Services and Support Division The proposals will be rigorously evaluated on elements of capability (60%), cost (20%) and economic benefits (20%). During the evaluation, a phased bid compliance process will be used to ensure that bidders have an opportunity to address non-compliance related to mandatory criteria in their proposals. The initial evaluation of proposals is anticipated to be completed by spring 2021, at which point Canada may choose to enter into dialogue with two or more compliant bidders and request revised proposals. Canada will finalize terms with the preferred bidder prior to the contract award, which is anticipated in 2022. Delivery of the first aircraft is expected as early as 2025. Quotes "I am extremely proud of the hard work and dedication in reaching this important milestone in the fighter fleet procurement process. I am confident that we will deliver on the government's commitment to provide the Royal Canadian Air Force with the right fighter jet, at the right price, with the right social and economic benefits for Canadians." The Honourable Anita Anand Minister of Public Services and Procurement "Through our fully costed and funded defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged, our government committed to purchasing a full fleet of 88 aircraft to be able to meet our NORAD and NATO obligations simultaneously. Efficient and modern fighter jets are an integral part of any air force and we continue to work diligently to make sure that we provide the members of the Royal Canadian Air Force the tools they need to protect Canada, both at home and abroad." The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan  Minister of National Defence "This project represents a once-in-a-generation opportunity to support the competitiveness and growth of Canada's aerospace and defence industries. Our government will evaluate each of these proposals based on their plans to invest in Canada's economy and to support high-value Canadian jobs." The Honourable Navdeep Bains Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Quick facts As part of its defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged, the government is acquiring 88 advanced fighter jets. This is the most significant investment in the RCAF in more than 30 years and is essential for protecting the safety and security of Canadians and meeting international obligations. Officials have conducted extensive engagement with Canadian aerospace and defence industries to ensure that they are well positioned to participate in the procurement. Canada's Industrial and Technological Benefits Policy, including Value Proposition applies to this procurement. This is expected to generate high-value jobs and economic growth for Canadian aerospace and defence businesses for decades to come. Bidders were required to demonstrate how they will fulfill the Government of Canada's economic benefits requirements. Those providing contractual guarantees will receive higher points in the evaluation of the Value Proposition. An independent fairness monitor is overseeing the entire process, to ensure a level playing field for all potential bidders. An independent third-party reviewer was also engaged to assess the quality and effectiveness of the procurement approach. Associated links Future Fighter Capability Project  National Defence: Fighter jets  Integrating Australian jets into the current Royal Canadian Air Force fighter fleet Follow us on Twitter  Follow us on Facebook SOURCE Public Services and Procurement Canada For further information: Cecely Roy, Press Secretary, Office of the Honourable Anita Anand, 343-549-7293, cecely.roy@canada.ca; Media Relations, Public Services and Procurement Canada, 819-420-5501, media@pwgsc-tpsgc.gc.ca Related Links www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/government-of-canada-receives-proposals-to-replace-its-fighter-jets-801677231.html

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