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May 13, 2022 | International, Aerospace

Nouvel avion de combat F-35 – Lockheed Martin va injecter 40 millions de dollars à Genève 

L’avionneur américain a signé un accord avec Mercury Systems, dans le cadre des affaires compensatoires liées à l’acquisition des F-35. 

https://www.24heures.ch/lockheed-martin-va-injecter-40-millions-de-dollars-a-geneve-806354282351

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  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - July 19, 2019

    July 22, 2019 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security, Other Defence

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - July 19, 2019

    MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY Lockheed Martin Corp., Missiles and Fire Control, Dallas, Texas, is being awarded a firm-fixed-price, $1,473,941,756 modification (P00019) to previously-awarded contract HQ0147-17-C-0032 for the procurement of Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) Interceptor support items in support of the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) case to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The value of this contract is increased from $3,890,665,224 to $5,364,606,980. One offer was solicited with one offer received. The work will be performed in Dallas, Texas; Sunnyvale, California; Huntsville, Alabama; Camden, Arkansas; and Troy, Alabama. The period of performance is from July 19, 2019, through July 31, 2023. KSA FMS funds in the amount of $340,940,179 are being obligated at time of award. The Missile Defense Agency, Huntsville, Alabama, is the contracting activity. AIR FORCE United Technologies Corp., doing business as Pratt & Whitney Military Engines, East Hartford, Connecticut, has been awarded a $253,708,434 indefinite-delivery-requirements contract for engine module remanufacture. This contract provides for F100-PW-100/-200/-220/-220E/-229/-229EEP engine module remanufacture for Foreign Military Sales (FMS) partner countries. Work will be performed at East Hartford, Connecticut; Midland, Georgia; and Midwest City, Oklahoma, and is expected to be completed by July 30, 2024. This contract involves foreign military sales to Chile, Indonesia, Taiwan, Poland, Greece, Iraq, Pakistan, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Thailand and Morocco. No funds are being obligated at the time of award. This award is the result of a sole source acquisition. The Air Force Sustainment Center, Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, is the contracting activity (FA8121-19-D-0005). Raytheon Corp., Marlborough, Massachusetts, is being awarded a $191,011,135 modification (P00084) to previously awarded contract FA8705-14-C-0001 for exercising the production option under contract line numbers 0004, 0005, 0007, 0008 and 0018 for global aircrew strategic network terminal. This modification brings the total cumulative value of the contract from $499,014,088 to $690,025,223. Work will be performed at Largo, Florida, and is expected to be completed by Sept. 19, 2021. Fiscal 2019 procurement funds in the amount of $154,685,867 are being obligated at time of award. The Air Force Material Command, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, is the contracting activity. DynCorp International LLC., Fort Worth, Texas, is being awarded a $37,641,699 modification (P00004) to previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract FA7014-18-F-5045 for the executive airlift maintenance support contract. This contract provides for aircraft maintenance and back shop support of aircraft. Work will be performed at Joint Base Andrews, Naval Air Facility, Washington, and is expected to be completed by Aug. 31, 2020. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $37,641,699 will be obligated at the time of award. The 11th Contracting Squadron Services Flight, Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, is the contracting activity. The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio, has been awarded a $7,441,142 cost reimbursement contract for space solar array architecture, power generation, and energy storage and distribution research. This contract provides for the development of advanced materials, interfaces, and electrical contacts for high efficiency and high specific power tandem thin film photovoltaic technologies to meet the needs of the Air Force for on-demand power in space. Work will be performed at Bancroft, Ohio, and is expected to be completed by July 2024. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and four offers were received. Fiscal 2018 and 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $6,617,000 are being obligated at time of award. The Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico, is the contracting activity (FA9453-19-C-1002). DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Brit Systems LLC, Dallas, Texas, has been awarded a maximum $400,000,000 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for digital imaging network picture archiving communications system products and maintenance. This was a competitive acquisition with nine offers received. This is the sixth contract competitively awarded under the open solicitation, SPE2D1-15-R-0004. This is a five-year base contract with one five-year option period. Locations of performance are Texas, and other areas located within and outside the continental U.S., with a July 18, 2024, performance completion date. Using customers are Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and federal civilian agencies. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2024 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE2D1-19-D-0020). Hartford Provisions Co., doing business as HPC Foodservice, South Windsor, Connecticut, has been awarded a maximum $7,576,803 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-quantity contract for full-line food distribution for customers located in the southern New England area (Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island). This was a sole-source acquisition in accordance with 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a 219-day contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Connecticut, with a Feb. 22, 2020, performance completion date. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force, Air National Guard and federal civilian agencies. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The contracting agency is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE300-19-D-3235). Awarded July 18, 2019 NAVY Allied Systems Co.,* Sherwood, Oregon, is awarded a $70,655,603 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract to provide for the design, development, test and manufacture of production of the new Carrier Crash and Salvage Crane (CCSC) and Amphibious Crash and Salvage Crane (ACSC). The CCSC and ACSC will be used for lifting and moving disabled aircraft on carrier vessel, nuclear and landing helicopter assault, and landing helicopter dock class ship flight decks. The CCSC and ACSC will replace the legacy A/S32A-35A and -52 Carrier Vessel Crash Cranes; and the A/S32A-36A and -53 Amphibious Assault Crash Cranes. This effort also includes engineering and logistics support. Work will be performed in Sherwood, Oregon, and is expected to be completed in July 2024. No funds will be obligated at the time of award. Funds will be obligated on individual orders as they are issued. This contract was competitively procured via an electronic request for proposal, with three offers received. The Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, New Jersey, is the contracting activity (N68335-19-D-0135). Progeny Systems Corp., Manassas, Virginia, is awarded a $51,071,180 firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the procurement of Navy systems engineering services, hardware and software. This contract includes options, which if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $93,171,904. Work will be performed in Manassas, Virginia (70%); Virginia Beach, Virginia (10%); Charleroi, Pennsylvania (10%); and Middletown, Rhode Island (10%); and is expected to be complete by June 2020, and if all options are exercised, work would continue to completion by July 2027. Royal Australian Navy funding in the amount of $1,235,312; and fiscal 2019 research, development, test, and evaluation (Navy) funding in the amount of $709,443 will be obligated at time of award and does not expire at the end of the fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured in accordance with 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(5). The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity (N00024-19-C-6118). Raytheon Co., Marlborough, Massachusetts, is awarded a $27,344,029 cost-plus, incentive-fee modification to previously awarded contract N00024-14-C-5315 to settle a request for equitable adjustment for contractor provision of Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR) program Pacific Missile Range Facility site generators and associated support hardware resulting from a government change order. The AMDR contract includes engineering and manufacturing development (EMD), as well as options for up to nine low-rate initial production shipsets. This modification increases the value of the AMDR EMD phase to account for new scope resulting from a government change order directing the contractor to provide Pacific Missile Range Facility site generators and support. Work was performed in Marlborough, Massachusetts (60%); and Kekaha, Hawaii (40%), and was completed in June 2018. Obligation of funds is not required. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. General Dynamics Mission Systems, Fairfax, Virginia, is awarded a $26,053,985 cost-plus-fixed-fee, cost-only contract for the procurement of Navy systems engineering services. This contract includes options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $211,479,513. This contract involves foreign military sales to Australia. Work will be performed in Fairfax, Virginia (89%); Cape Canaveral, Florida (6%); and Pawcatuck, Connecticut (5%), and is expected to be completed by July 2021. If all options are exercised, work will continue through July 2027. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funding in the amount of $210,242; and Royal Australian Navy funding in the amount of $600,000 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with three offers received. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity (N00024-19-C-6407). General Dynamics Mission Systems, Fairfax, Virginia, is awarded a $22,778,107 cost-plus-fixed-fee, cost-only modification to previously awarded contract N00024-19-C-6407 to exercise options for Navy systems engineering services. Work will be performed in Fairfax, Virginia, and is expected to be completed July 2022. If all options are exercised, work will continue through July 2027. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funding in the amount of $1,220,000 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. PC Mechanical Inc., Santa Maria, California, is awarded a $19,000,000 firm-fixed-price modification under a previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N39430-15-D-1604) to exercise Option Four for inspection, overhaul, repair, refurbishment, preventive maintenance and logistics management information services to reconstitute the force of civil engineer support equipment (CESE) and civil engineer end items (CEEI) under the CESE/CEEI Life Extension Program (CLEP) at Naval Base, Ventura County. Work to be performed provides for management of CLEP to obtain inspection; overhaul; repair; refurbishment; preventive maintenance; and logistics management information services for automotive vehicles, construction equipment (motorized and non-motorized), special military construction and commercial support equipment, material and weight handling equipment, water well drilling equipment, mineral products and plant facility equipment, international standard organization shipping container assets, power production and environmental control unit equipment, fire and emergency response vehicles, and small boats and watercraft to support the Navy and other Department of Defense components worldwide. The total contract amount after exercise of this option will be $95,000,000. No task orders are being issued at this time. We work will be performed in Port Hueneme, California (60%); and Gulfport, Mississippi (40%), and is expected to be completed July 2020. No funds will be obligated at time of award. Funds will be obligated on individual task orders as they are issued. Task orders will be primarily funded by fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy). The Naval Facilities Engineering and Expeditionary Warfare Center, Port Hueneme, California, is the contracting activity. ARMY PAE Government Systems Inc., Arlington, Virginia, was awarded a $22,578,864 modification (P00012) to Foreign Military Sales (Afghanistan) contract W56HZV-17-C-0117 for contractor logistic support efforts to the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces. Work will be performed in Kabul, Afghanistan, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 30, 2022. Fiscal 2019 Afghanistan Security Forces funds in the amount of $22,578,864 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity. TDX Quality LLC,* Anchorage, Alaska, was awarded a $19,315,709 firm-fixed-price contract for the construction of Alaska U.S. Property and Fiscal Office Building at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. Bids were solicited via the internet with five received. Work will be performed in Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, with an estimated completion date of March 12, 2021. Fiscal 2019 military construction funds in the amount of $19,315,709 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Property and Fiscal Office, Alaska, is the contracting activity (W91ZRU-19-C-0003). Inland Dredging Co. LLC, Dyersburg, Tennessee, was awarded a $16,744,000 firm-fixed-price contract for furnishing one fully-crewed and equipped hydraulic pipeline cutterhead dredge on a rental basis for the removal and satisfactory disposal of shoal material. Bids were solicited via the internet with three received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of April 15, 2021. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans, Louisiana, is the contracting activity (W912P8-19-D-0012). DEFENSE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AGENCY Iridium Satellite LLC., Tempe, Arizona, was awarded a non-competitive, firm-fixed-price contract modification (P00013) for the extension of services on the current Airtime contract (HC104714C4000). The face value of this action is $8,836,000 funded by fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The total cumulative face value of the contract is $478,194,000. Performance will be at the contractor's facility. The original solicitation was issued on the basis of other than full and open competition pursuant to 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1), only one responsible source and no other type of supplies or services would satisfy agency requirements. The period of performance is July 22, 2019, through Aug. 21, 2019. The Defense Information Technology Organization, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, is the contracting activity. *Small Business

  • PBO to examine $60 billion price tag of new warships and compare to other less expensive foreign programs

    August 10, 2020 | International, Naval

    PBO to examine $60 billion price tag of new warships and compare to other less expensive foreign programs

    David Pugliese, Ottawa Citizen, Postmedia News (dpugliese@ottawacitizen.com) Published: Aug 07 at 6:31 p.m. Updated: a day ago The $60 billion price tag of Canada's proposed new fleet of warships will come under the scrutiny of the Parliamentary Budget Officer, who will also examine other less costly similar projects underway in other countries. The House of Commons government operations committee requested that Parliamentary Budget Officer Yves Giroux examine the cost of the Canadian Surface Combatant project and take a look at the cost of two other types of warships: the FREMM and the Type 31. PBO spokeswoman Sloane Mask said the analysis would be presented to the committee by Oct. 22. “The analytical work is currently underway,” she added. Last year the Liberal government signed an initial deal that is expected to lead to the eventual construction of 15 warships in the largest single government purchase in Canadian history. Lockheed Martin offered Canada the Type 26 warship designed by BAE in the United Kingdom. Irving is the prime contractor and the vessels will be built at its east coast shipyard. Construction of the first ship isn't expected to begin until the early 2020s. But the Canadian Surface Combatant (CSC) program has already faced rising costs. In 2008, the then-Conservative government estimated the project would cost roughly $26 billion. But in 2015, Vice-Admiral Mark Norman, then commander of the navy, voiced concern that taxpayers may not have been given all the information about the program, publicly predicting the cost for the warships alone would approach $30 billion. The overall project is currently estimated to cost around $60 billion. “Approximately one-half of the CSC build cost is comprised of labour in the (Irving) Halifax yard and materials,” according to federal government documents obtained by this newspaper through the Access to Information law. But some members of parliament and industry representatives have privately questioned whether the CSC cost is too high. There have been suggestions that Canada could dump the Type 26 design and go for a cheaper alternative since the CSC project is still in early stages and costs to withdraw could be covered by savings from a less expensive ship. Canada had already been pitched on alternatives. In December 2017, the French and Italian governments proposed a plan in which Canada could build the FREMM frigate at Irving. Those governments offered to guarantee the cost of the 15 ships at a fixed $30 billion, but that was rejected by the Canadian government. Earlier this year, the U.S. Navy selected the FREMM design for its newest fleet of warships. The estimated cost is around $1.3 billion per ship. The other type of warship the PBO will look at is the Type 31, which is to be built for the Royal Navy in the United Kingdom. Those ships are to cost less than $500 million each. In 2017, then Parliamentary Budget Officer Jean-Denis Fréchette estimated the CSC program would cost $61.82 billion. The entry of the BAE Type 26 warship in the Canadian competition was controversial from the start and sparked complaints that the procurement process was skewed to favour that vessel. Previously the Liberal government had said only mature existing designs or designs of ships already in service with other navies would be accepted on the grounds they could be built faster and would be less risky. Unproven designs can face challenges if problems are found once the vessel is in the water and operating. But the criteria was changed and the government and Irving accepted the BAE design, though at the time it existed only on the drawing board. Construction began on the first Type 26 frigate in the summer of 2017 for Britain's Royal Navy. Copyright Postmedia Network Inc., 2020 https://www.thechronicleherald.ca/news/canada/pbo-to-examine-60-billion-price-tag-of-new-warships-and-compare-to-other-less-expensive-foreign-programs-482874/

  • Here’s how a CR could hurt America’s nuclear weapons modernization

    November 13, 2019 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land

    Here’s how a CR could hurt America’s nuclear weapons modernization

    By: Aaron Mehta WASHINGTON — A long-term continuing resolution will result in delays for modernizing America's nuclear warheads, while putting at risk an already challenging plan to build plutonium pits needed for the next generation of U.S. intercontinental ballistic missiles, nuclear officials are warning. The National Nuclear Security Administration is a semiautonomous agency under the Department of Energy that handles the manufacturing and maintenance of America's nuclear warheads. Like other government agencies, NNSA would be limited to fiscal 2019 funding limits under a continuing resolution, and it would be unable to start new contracts. The current continuing resolution, or CR, is set to end Nov. 21, but there is little expectation that regular budgeting will then resume. Congress is debating the merits of pushing the CR through December, but analysts are concerned the CR could extend into next year. “We are in a situation right now where we have single-point failures throughout our enterprise,” Lisa Gordon-Hagerty, the NNSA administrator, said during a Defense Writers Group breakfast earlier this month. “It's necessary for us, for the NNSA and for the nuclear security enterprise to receive consistent and robust funding to modernize our infrastructure as well as continue ongoing operations.” “We're looking at where we can move funding insofar as CRs will allow us to do so,” she added. “We're working very closely with OMB and the administration to see what we can do to continue our important programs to modernize the infrastructure as well as the stockpile and our workforce initiatives and our endeavors.” Gordon-Hagerty did not go into detail about specific CR-related worries, but according to an NNSA source, the agency has identified three main areas of concern under a longer CR. The first is, broadly, keeping the warhead modernization efforts on schedule. Two of those modernization programs — the B61-12 gravity bomb and W88 submarine-launched ballistic missile warhead — already face program delays thanks to an issue with a commercial part that has to be redesigned. Gordon-Hagerty said a CR should not impact that particular issue, as the funding for a solution is coming from a realignment of other warhead modernization programs. But a delay to one program caused by a CR “does affect all of the other modernization programs and all of the other work that we have ongoing throughout our nuclear security enterprise,” she said. The second major area of concern is the surplus plutonium disposition program, which is supposed to dispose of 34 metric tons of excess plutonium at a South Carolina facility. That program emerged as the successor to the controversial MOX program, and has faced opposition from South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham. Construction on that facility could be delayed under a CR. The NNSA source said that the agency requested extra funding for the surplus plutonium disposition program through the budget anomaly process, but was not given the resources it requested. The third area of concern is a 10-year plan to develop a native plutonium pit in the United States. The NNSA has been charged with producing 80 plutonium pits a year by 2030, a target that Gordon-Hagerty acknowledged is a tight window for the agency to hit, even with stable funding. “We are again rebalancing, looking at our budget across the entire enterprise to see what it is we need to do to meet the scope and schedule of that 2030,” she said. “Am I confident we can get there? Yes. Is it fraught with — probably a bad way of saying it — land mines? It is.” Construction costs Construction featuring prominently on this list should not be a huge surprise; NNSA officials are quick to point out in public events that they are still using some buildings that date back to the Manhattan Project. According to Gordon-Hagerty, more than 50 percent of NNSA facilities are more than 40 years old, and over a third of those are about 70 years of age. The looming CR extension comes as the agency launches a number of construction projects, and a CR could lead to major delays in standing up those facilities. While that's an issue for every agency under a CR, the NNSA is concerned that the specialty construction talent needed to build those facilities may not available if a contract is frozen and then picked up again later. There could also be high-dollar costs. Responding to a lawsuit by environmental groups trying to halt the construction of the Y-12 facility in Tennessee, NNSA said a six- to 12-month delay in construction at that location could result in almost $1 billion in extra costs for taxpayers and the agency may have to lay off 1,000 construction personnel. Those numbers, first reported by the Exchange Monitor, likely have resonance with other potential delays at construction sites caused by a CR — meaning construction delays at one or more sites could quickly become costly for an agency whose facilities and construction needs have traditionally been underfunded. “It's been on schedule and on budget for the last six years. It will be finished in 2025 for approximately $6.5 billion,” Gordon-Hagerty said of the Y-12 facility. “If that funding somehow fails to materialize, then we've got over 1,000 crafts [personnel] working at the site right now. Crafts personnel are hard to come by, especially those that are qualified. So if they see a question about funding or funding gets pulled back, they're going to find positions elsewhere.” https://www.defensenews.com/smr/nuclear-arsenal/2019/11/12/heres-how-a-cr-could-hurt-americas-nuclear-weapons-modernization/

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