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November 9, 2020 | Local, C4ISR

New quantum computing funding opportunity

Shared Services Canada (SSC) is seeking a user-friendly solution for using Quantum Computing-as-a-Service (QCaaS) to optimize complex problem solving.

Think you can solve this challenge? Compete for funding to prove your feasibility and develop a solution! This challenge is open until December 15th, 2020.

Quantum Coputing-as-a-Service

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  • Fighter jet firms mull pullout from Canadian competition – F-35 could be last plane standing

    July 22, 2019 | Local, Aerospace

    Fighter jet firms mull pullout from Canadian competition – F-35 could be last plane standing

    DAVID PUGLIESE, OTTAWA CITIZEN Airbus and Boeing may pull out of a bidding process to supply Canada with new fighter jets because they say the contest is unfairly tilted toward Lockheed Martin's F-35, Reuters has reported. Officials with Saab have expressed similar concerns. The news comes as the request for proposals (bids) is expected to be released soon. Boeing and Airbus have now formally written to the federal government expressing concerns about the current requirements, according to Reuters. Pat Finn, the Assistant Deputy Minister for Materiel at the Department of National Defence, has confirmed one of the companies sent a formal letter but he didn't provide details. It's no secret Saab, Airbus and Boeing are upset with the changes made to the competition after the Pentagon threatened to pull the F-35 out of the $19 billion competition. Officials with Lockheed Martin's three competitors say the Canadian government went overboard to please the Pentagon and the bid package is now designed so the F-35 would emerge as the clear winner. That would make the Royal Canadian Air Force happy since it has always wanted the F-35 stealth fighter. The Liberal government has committed to purchasing 88 new fighter jets. The competition was launched on Dec. 12, 2017. Four fighter jets are to be considered. Those include the F-35, the Super Hornet, the Eurofighter Typhoon and the Gripen. In the fall of 2018 Dassault Aviation pulled out as a potential bidder. The company had planned to offer the Rafale but decided against competing the aircraft because of the extensive requirements for interoperability with the U.S. military. The first delivery of the jets is expected in the mid-2020s with the full capability available in the early 2030s, according to the DND document. The requirements for a new Canadian fighter jet put emphasis on strategic attack and striking at ground targets during foreign missions, according to federal government procurement documents obtained by Postmedia. While the Liberal government has been highlighting the need to buy the jets to protect Canadian airspace and meet the country's commitments to the U.S.-Canadian North American Aerospace Defence Command, the procurement criteria, currently in draft form, provides additional weight to those aircraft that can excel at ground attack for overseas operations. That criteria is seen to favour Lockheed Martin's F-35 stealth jet, say those industry representatives allied with Lockheed's rivals. But Finn, the Department of National Defence's procurement chief, says there is such a wide variety of requirements to meet that while some aircraft might be seen to do well in some areas, they may not excel in others. “Somebody may be better in a high-end scenario but they're worst for cost,” Finn explained in a recent interview. “That's why we say it's the whole piece” that will be considered in the competition. Some will dismiss the latest news about companies threatening to pullout of the competition as a bluff or a last-ditch effort to force changes on the request for proposal package, which is expected to be released in a week or so. That is one scenario. The other scenario is this: the effort to prepare a bid is expected to cost each firm about $15 million and involve up to 30 staff members. It is an extensive process. If Canada's request for proposals is so tilted towards the F-35 – or seen to be tilted – then companies will think twice about committing to that process. (Analysis) https://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/fighter-jet-firms-mull-pullout-from-canadian-competition-f-35-could-be-last-plane-standing

  • 2021 Halifax International Security Forum – Anita Anand Opening Remarks

    November 24, 2021 | Local, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

    2021 Halifax International Security Forum – Anita Anand Opening Remarks

    Defence Minister Anita Anand delivers opening remarks as the 13th annual Halifax International Security Forum gets underway. The three-day conference brings together security and defence experts, political leaders and academics from around the world. Minister Anand begins her remarks by commenting on the flooding that has ravaged the southwestern part of British Columbia. (November 19, 2021)

  • Chief of the Defence Staff announces Canadian Armed Forces General and Flag Officer senior appointments, promotions, and retirements

    February 13, 2019 | Local, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR

    Chief of the Defence Staff announces Canadian Armed Forces General and Flag Officer senior appointments, promotions, and retirements

    February 12, 2019 – Ottawa – National Defence / Canadian Armed Forces General Jonathan Vance, Chief of the Defence Staff, issued a CANFORGEN announcing the list of Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) General and Flag Officer senior appointments, promotions, and retirements that will occur in 2019. General Officers (Canadian Army and the Royal Canadian Air Force) and Flag Officers (Royal Canadian Navy) lead the CAF in defending our country's values and interests, here at home and abroad. They share the responsibility for the stewardship of the entire institution, and for the profession of arms as a whole. For 2019, the total number of permanent General Officer and Flag Officer positions required to meet the demands of the Canadian Armed Forces is 116 (105 Regular Force and 11 Reserve Force). The number of senior staff fluctuates as a result of the needs of the military to meet Government of Canada and institutional objectives, which is constantly changing. Certain positions have been created to help us meet the following commitments found in Canada's defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged: supporting health and resilience, investments in the Royal Canadian Navy, enhancing cyber capabilities, transforming innovation for defence excellence and security, and continued global defence engagement. Biographies of senior officers may be made available upon request by contacting Media Relations. Quotes “The role of a General and Flag Officer in the Canadian Armed Forces comes with enormous responsibility. Those selected demonstrate they are capable of surmounting the significant challenges associated with leading and improving Canada's armed forces. For those leaving the Forces, they should do so proudly, as they are a testament to the qualities required to keep Canada's military strong and effective.” – General Jonathan Vance, Chief of the Defence Staff Quick facts In order to align authorities, responsibilities, and accountabilities with the US NORAD, Major-General D.W. Joyce will be appointed Deputy Commander Continental US NORAD Region, in Tyndall Florida, in a position that has been up-ranked to Major-General. To lead the modernization and growth of the Canadian Forces Health Services Group, Brigadier-General A.M.T. Downes will be promoted to the rank of Major-General and will continue to serve in his current appointment as Commander Canadian Forces Health Services Group / Surgeon General for the CAF, at NDHQ in Ottawa, in a position that has been up-ranked. Colonel J.G.M. Bilodeau will be promoted to the rank of Brigadier-General and appointed to a new position as Director General Clinical Services / Deputy Commander Canadian Forces Health Services Group, in Ottawa and will become the Department Health Advisor to the CDS. In order to enhance continental maritime command, control, and cooperation with the US Navy, Commodore S.M. Waddell will be promoted to the rank of Rear-Admiral and appointed to a new position as Vice Commander 2nd Fleet United States Navy, in Norfolk Virginia. To develop CAF/DND data strategies, policies and to lead data management governance, Brigadier-General A.T. Benson will be appointed to a new position as Deputy Director General Data Strategy and Innovation, in Ottawa. Additional capacity is required to focus on key departmental initiatives. As such, Brigadier-General S.T. Boyle will be appointed to a new position as Deputy Director General Continental Policy, at NDHQ in Ottawa. https://www.canada.ca/en/department-national-defence/news/2019/02/chief-of-the-defence-staff-announces-canadian-armed-forces-general-and-flag-officer-senior-appointments-promotions-and-retirements.html

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