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November 18, 2020 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - November 18, 2020

NAVY

General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, is awarded a $146,118,867 cost-plus-award-fee modification against previously awarded contract N00024-19-C-4452 for DDG planning yard services. Work will be performed in Bath, Maine, and is expected to be completed by January 2022. Fiscal 2020 other procurement (Navy) (80%); and fiscal 2021 operation and maintenance (Navy) (20%), funding in the amount of $1,016,645 will be obligated at time of award, of which $200,866 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair, Bath, Maine, is the contracting activity.

Lockheed Martin Corp., Liverpool, New York, is awarded a $22,827,962 modification (P00003) to a firm-fixed-price order N00019-20-F-0535 against previously issued basic ordering agreement N00019-19-G-0029. This modification exercises an option to procure 12 retrofit advanced radar processor systems for the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft. Work will be performed in Liverpool, New York (54%); and Andover, Massachusetts (46%), and is expected to be completed in April 2025. Fiscal 2021 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $22,827,962 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

Lockheed Martin Corp., Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, is awarded an $11,977,622 modification (P00003) to previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract N00019-20-C-0026. This modification provides continued support required to establish the common reprogramming tool development network and selection of a service-oriented architecture for the development of enhanced reprogramming tools, which is essential for all standing labs in support of the F-35 aircraft for the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and the governments of Australia and Great Britain. Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas (90%); and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida (10%), and is expected to be completed in December 2021. Fiscal 2021 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funds in the amount of $711,406; fiscal 2021 research, development, test and evaluation (Air Force) funds in the amount of $711,406; and non-Department of Defense funds in the amount of $2,800,000, will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Rolling Meadows, Illinois, is awarded an $8,456,902 modification (P00010) to cost-plus-fixed-fee delivery order N00019-19-F-0453 against previously issued basic ordering agreement N00019-15-G-0026. This modification adds scope to provide non-recurring engineering to upgrade the current large aircraft infrared countermeasures system processor replacement in support of efforts to resolve advanced threat warning processor and control indicator unit diminishing manufacturing source issues, and exercises an option to provide expanded growth capability for the AN/AAQ-24 system for the Navy and the Air Force. Work will be performed in Rolling Meadows, Illinois, and is expected to be completed in April 2023. Fiscal 2019 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $5,075,661; fiscal 2020 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $2,961,241; and fiscal 2020 aircraft procurement (Air Force) funds in the amount of $420,000, will be obligated at time of award; $5,075,661 of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

ARMY

BAE Systems, Nashua, New Hampshire, was awarded a $49,937,097 firm-fixed-price contract for the Common Missile Warning System. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 15, 2025. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-21-D-0010).

General Dynamics Land Systems, Sterling Heights, Michigan, was awarded a $25,982,972 modification (P00004) to contract W56HZV-20-C-0031 to provide maintenance training and procedural technical assistance to the Kuwait Land Force. Work will be performed in Kuwait City, Kuwait, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 5, 2023. Fiscal 2010 Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $25,982,972 were obligated at the time of the award. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Detroit Arsenal, Michigan, is the contracting activity.

MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY

ARES Technical Services Corp.,* Burlingame, California, is being awarded a $51,962,387 competitive cost-plus-fixed-fee, level-of-effort contract with a three-year base value of $21,651,531 and two one-year options for Technical, Engineering, Advisory, and Management Support (TEAMS) - Next Safety advisory and assistance services. The work will be performed in Fort Belvoir, Virginia; Dahlgren, Virginia; Huntsville, Alabama; Fort Greely, Alaska; Vandenberg Air Force Base, California; Kirkland AFB, New Mexico; Pacific Missile Range Facility, Hawaii; and White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 13, 2025. This contract was competitively procured via publication on the beta.SAM.gov website with three proposals received. Fiscal 2021 research, development, test and evaluation; and Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $2,599,751 are being obligated at time of award. The Missile Defense Agency, Huntsville, Alabama, is the contracting activity (HQ0858-21-C-0011).

AIR FORCE

L‐3 Communications Vertex Aerospace LLC, Madison, Mississippi, has been awarded a $38,000,000 firm-fixed‐price, indefinite‐delivery/indefinite‐quantity modification (P00021) to contract FA8106‐17‐D‐0001 for contractor logistic support of the Air Force C‐12 fleet. Work will be performed in Madison, Mississippi; San Angelo, Texas; Okmulgee, Oklahoma; Buenos Ares, Argentina; Gaborone, Botswana; Brasilia, Brazil; Bogota, Colombia; Cairo, Egypt; Accra, Ghana; Tegucigalpa, Honduras; Budapest, Hungary; Joint Base Andrews, Maryland; Nairobi, Kenya; Rabat, Morocco; Manila, Philippines; Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Bangkok, Thailand; Ankara, Turkey; Edwards Air Force Base, California; Holloman AFB, New Mexico; Joint Base Elmendorf‐Richardson, Alaska; Oslo, Norway; and Yokota Air Base, Japan. Work is expected to be completed by Dec. 31, 2021. The estimated cumulative face value of the contract is $158,000,000. Fiscal 2021 operation and maintenance in the amount of $6,648,772 will be obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, is the contracting activity.

Engineering Arresting Systems Corp., Ashton, Pennsylvania, has been awarded a $15,691,772 requirements-indefinite-delivery type, firm‐fixed-price production contract for the Mobile Runway Edge Sheave (MRES). Work will be performed in Ashton, Pennsylvania, and is expected to be completed Nov. 15, 2028. This contract is the result of a sole-source acquisition. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA8534-21-D-0001).

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Burlington Apparel Fabrics, Greensboro, North Carolina, has been awarded a maximum $9,602,250 modification (P00010) exercising the second one-year option period of a one-year base contract (SPE1C1-19-D-1113) with four one-year option periods for cloth. This is a firm-fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract. Location of performance is North Carolina, with a Nov. 18, 2021, ordering period end date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2021 through 2022 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

*Small business

https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Contracts/Contract/Article/2416815/source/GovDelivery/

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