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July 23, 2020 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - July 22, 2020

AIR FORCE

AECOM Management Services Inc., Germantown, Maryland (FA3002-20-D-0012); AKIMA Logistics Services LLC, Herndon, Virginia (FA3002-20-D-0013); DynCorp International LLC, Fort Worth, Texas (FA3002-20-D0010); Jacobs Technology Inc., Fort Walton Beach, Florida (FA3022-20-D-0014); Leidos Inc., Reston, Virginia (FA3002-20-D-0011); M1 Support Services LP, Denton, Texas (FA3002-20-D-0015); PAE Services LLC, Arlington, Virginia (FA3002-20-D-0016); and Vertex Aerospace LLC, Madison, Missouri (FA3002-20-D-0017), have been awarded a maximum $14,000,000,000 multiple-award, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity (IDIQ) contract for Aircraft Maintenance Enterprise Solution -- a strategic sourcing vehicle for Air Force-wide contracted aircraft maintenance. The contractors will provide all organizational-level maintenance services for all aircraft listed in each individual task order performance work statement, which can include any aircraft platform (excluding rotary wing, tiltrotor and remotely piloted aircraft). Because this is an IDIQ, the location of performance is not known at this time and will be cited on individual task orders. Generally, work will be performed at government facilities and is expected to be completed Sept. 14, 2030. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition with 19 offers received. No funds are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Installation Contracting Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, Texas, is the contracting activity (FA3002-19-R-A001).

DynCorp International LLC, Fort Worth, Texas, has been awarded a $17,760,615 modification (P00004) to contract FA3002-19-D-A004 to increase the ceiling for the firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for J85 engine maintenance. This contract provides for managing the full cycle of production by planning, scheduling, directing and controlling all maintenance on jet engines and support equipment, as well as monitoring serviceable base stock levels and target serviceable requirements of each customer. Work will be performed at Laughlin Air Force Base, Texas, and is expected to be completed Sept. 30, 2020. No funds are being obligated at the time of award. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. The Air Force Installation Contracting Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, Texas, is the contracting activity.

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Herndon, Virginia, has been awarded a $16,284,463 cost-plus-award-fee undefinitized task order under the ground subsystems sustainment contract (FA8214-15-D-0001) for the Minuteman III general sustainment. Work will be performed in Layton, Utah, and is expected to be completed Aug. 31, 2021. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $8,142,232 are being obligated at the time of award of the base period. The Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center, Hill Air Force Base, Utah, is the contracting activity (FA8214-20-F-0082).

Advantor IDS Inc., Orlando, Florida, has been awarded a $9,999,999 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for intrusion detection system (IDS) supplies and ancillary services. The contractor shall provide all supplies (hardware) and complete all installation of all IDS and test operations. Work will be performed at Edwards Air Force Base, California, and is expected to be completed July 16, 2025. This award is the result of sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2020 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $237,456 are being obligated at the time of award. The Directorate of Contracting, Edwards AFB, California, is the contracting activity.

CORRECTION: The contract announced on July 20, 2020, to BAE Systems Technology Solutions & Services Inc., Rockville, Maryland, for the Instrumentation Range Support Program, has not yet been awarded.

CORRECTION: The contract announced on July 20, 2020, to six firms for design-build construction efforts at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, included an incorrect location for RORE Inc. (FA4620-20-0009). The firm is actually located in Gig Harbor, Washington.

ARMY

Lockheed Martin Corp., Orlando, Florida, was awarded a $702,881,910 modification (P00042) to contract W31P4Q-18-C-0130 for procurement of Hellfire missiles. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2023. Fiscal 2010, 2011, 2018, 2019 and 2020 other procurement (Army) funds in the amount of $702,754,471 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity.

Southwest Valley Constructors, Albuquerque, New Mexico, was awarded a $24,577,981 modification (P00016) to contract W912PL-19-C-0015 to design and construct approximately 31.65 miles of three-phase power distribution, lighting, closed-circuit television camera, linear ground detection system and shelters for the Barrier Wall Project. Work will be performed in Lukeville, Arizona, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 7, 2021. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance (Army) funds in the amount of $24,577,981 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Albuquerque, New Mexico, is the contracting activity.

Agile Infrastructure Services LLC,* Pinehurst, Idaho, was awarded a $13,000,000 modification (P00010) to contract W9124C-15-D-0005 for construction, repair and maintenance of installation facilities on Fort Jackson, South Carolina. Bids were solicited via the internet with nine received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 17, 2020. U.S. Army 419th Contracting Support Brigade, Fort Jackson, South Carolina, is the contracting activity. (Awarded July 15, 2020)

Joseph B. Fay Co., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was awarded a $12,938,950 firm-fixed-price contract for the repair and rehabilitation of the gate hoist machinery and the performance of control-system upgrades at the Montgomery Locks and Dam. Bids were solicited via the internet with three received. Work will be performed in Monaca, Pennsylvania, with an estimated completion date of Oct. 10, 2022. Fiscal 2019 and 2020 civil operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $12,938,950 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity (W911WN-20-C-8002).

DEFENSE THREAT REDUCTION AGENCY

L3 Applied Technologies Inc., a subsidiary of L3Harris Technologies Inc., San Leandro, California, will be awarded a $73,752,927 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (with one firm-fixed-price line item for long lead time materials) for X-ray simulators for test and evaluation of nuclear survivability. Work will be performed at the contractor's location in San Leandro, California, and is expected to be completed by May 2025. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2020 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $3,827,342 will be obligated at the time of award. The Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, is the contracting activity (HDTRA1-20-C-0038).

NAVY

Crowley Government Services, Jacksonville, Florida, is awarded a $24,070,898 firm-fixed-price contract with reimbursable elements extension to continue the operation and maintenance of five T-AGOS ocean surveillance ships and two T-AGM missile range instrumentation ships. This extension includes one six-month base and two six-month option periods which, if exercised, will bring the cumulative value of this contract to $450,127,044. Work will be performed at sea worldwide. The following ships will be worked on: USNS Victorious T-AGOS 19; USNS Able T-AGOS 20; USNS Effective T-AGOS 21; USNS Loyal T-AGOS 22; USNS Impeccable T-AGOS 23; USNS Invincible T-AGM 24; and the USNS Howard T-AGM 25. Work is expected to be completed by January 2021. Navy working capital funds in the amount of $24,070,898 are obligated for fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2021 and will not expire at the end of the fiscal year. This contract extension was not competitively procured. The contract was prepared under the provisions of 10 U.S. Code §2304(c)(1), as implemented by Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1(a)(2)(iii). There is only one responsible source and no other supplies or services will satisfy agency requirements. The Military Sealift Command, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (N62387-15-C-2505).

S&S Concrete Construction,* Leesburg, Georgia, is awarded a $10,000,000 maximum amount, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity construction contract for asphalt paving and minor concrete work at Marine Corps Logistics Base, Albany, Georgia. No task orders are being issued at this time. The work will be performed in Albany, Georgia. The term of the contract is not to exceed 60 months and work is expected to be completed by September 2025. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance (Navy) (O&M, N) contract funds in the amount of $5,000 are obligated on this award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Future task orders will be primarily funded by O&M, N. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website and eight bids were received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (N40085-20-D-0101).

National Steel and Shipbuilding Co., San Diego, California, is awarded a $10,000,000 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to previously awarded contract N00024-18-C-4404 for USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6) emergency firefighting support, dewatering, safety and initial clean-up efforts. Work will be performed in San Diego, California, and is expected to be completed by November 2020. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $7,700,000 was obligated at time of award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Southwest Regional Maintenance Center, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity.

Lockheed Martin Rotary and Mission Systems, Moorestown, New Jersey, is awarded a $7,634,002 firm-fixed-price modification to previously awarded contract N00024-14-C-5106 for the production and delivery of AEGIS weapon system MK 6 MOD 1 spares for new construction and AEGIS modernization guided missile destroyers. Work will be performed in Clearwater, Florida (90%); and Moorestown, New Jersey (10%), and is expected to be completed by April 2022. Fiscal 2020 other procurement (Navy); and 2018 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy) funding in the amount of $7,634,002 will be obligated at the time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity.

Patriot Construction Co., Dunkirk, Maryland, is awarded a $7,173,707 firm-fixed-price contract for construction of training facilities at Marine Corps Base (MCB), Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Work will be performed in Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The work to be performed is for the construction of Special Operations Forces Human Performance Training Facilities, miscellaneous supporting structures, modifications to buildings RR-136 and RR-136A, utilities, parking, roadways and site work. The structures will be single-story steel frame buildings with brick veneer over metal studs, standing seam metal roofs, metal soffits, translucent wall panels and mezzanines. Special construction features include soil surcharge loads and storm water best management practices. Electrical systems include primary power distribution; lighting; energy monitoring/control systems; intrusion detection system; telephone/data and switch/server rooms; electrical switch gear; transformers; circuits; and fire alarms. Mechanical systems include plumbing; fire protection; compressed air; dehumidification; air conditioning systems; a chiller yard; and digital controls. Information systems include telephone, data, local area network, mass notification and intercom. Site work will include building utility systems; traffic control; parking; domestic water; fire protection water; sanitary sewer; sewage conveyance; propane gas networks; perimeter security fencing; gates; storm water; management; fiber/copper communications; cable television; and area lighting. Construction includes sustainable features complying with high performance sustainable building guiding principles. Work is expected to be completed by February 2022. Fiscal 2019 military construction (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $7,173,707 are obligated on this award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website and three proposals were received. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (N40085-20-C-0142).

*Small Business

https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Contracts/Contract/Article/2283344/source/GovDelivery/

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  • Air Force study on future aerial refueling tanker could start in 2022

    February 5, 2021 | International, Aerospace

    Air Force study on future aerial refueling tanker could start in 2022

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