Back to news

February 2, 2021 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - February 01, 2021

NAVY

Raytheon Technologies Corp., Pratt and Whitney, Pratt and Whitney Military Engines, East Hartford, Connecticut, is awarded a $290,704,534 cost-plus-incentive-fee, fixed-price incentive (firm target) contract. This contract provides material and support equipment for depot maintenance facilities, program administrative labor for non-recurring sustainment activities, mockup engines and modules for test cells, as well as supplies, services, and planning for depot activations in support of the F-35 Lightning II Program Lot 13 propulsion system for the Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, non-Department of Defense (DOD) participants and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) customers. Work will be performed in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (30%); East Hartford, Connecticut (22%); Cherry Point, North Carolina (10%); Indianapolis, Indiana (6.75%); Windsor, Connecticut (3.25%); Yuma, Arizona (1.25%); Norfolk, United Kingdom (1%); Leeuwarden, Netherlands (1%); various locations within the continental U.S. (3.75%); and various locations outside the continental U.S. (21%), and is expected to be completed in January 2024. Fiscal 2020 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $89,468,714; fiscal 2020 aircraft procurement (Air Force) funds in the amount of $84,152,318; non-DOD participant funds in the amount of $45,225,342; and FMS funds in the amount of $15,886,074, will be obligated at the time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1). The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity (N00019-21-C-0006).

Crowley Government Services Inc., Jacksonville, Florida (N62387-15-C-2505) is awarded a $25,484,291 modification under a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract to exercise a six month option period (P00128) for the operation and maintenance of five Navy ocean surveillance ships USNS Victorious (T-AGOS 19); USNS Able (T-AGOS 20); USNS Effective (T-AGOS 21); USNS Loyal (T-AGOS 22); and USNS Impeccable (T-AGOS 23), and missile range instrumentation ships USNS Invincible (T-AGM 24); and USNS Howard Lorenzen (T-AGM 25). This modification provides for the exercises of a six-month option period to the bridge contract that was awarded on July 22, 2020. Work will be performed at sea, world-wide beginning Feb. 1, 2021, and is expected to be completed by July 31, 2021. Working capital funds (Navy) in the amount of $25,484,291 are obligated for fiscal 2021 and will not expire at the end of the fiscal year. This bridge was not competitively procured and was prepared in accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1 and 10 U.S. Code § 2304(c)(1). The Military Sealift Command, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity.

Lockheed Martin, Mission Systems and Training, Baltimore, Maryland, is awarded a $14,184,813 cost-plus award-fee order N62786-21-F-0004, against previously awarded basic ordering agreement N00024-19-G-2313 to provide engineering and management services for LCS-21 post shakedown availability. Work will be performed in Mayport, Florida (37%); Moorestown, New Jersey (29%); Virginia Beach, Virginia (18%); Washington, D.C. (15%); and Baltimore, Maryland (1%), and is expected to be completed by July 2022. Fiscal 2015 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy) $5,339,694 funding will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion, and Repair, Bath, Maine, is the contracting activity.

ARMY

Ellume USA LLC, Valencia, California, was awarded a $250,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract to procure reliable home use testing without prescription requirements to meet the demand to respond to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work will be performed in Valencia, California, with an estimated completion date of Feb. 1, 2022. Fiscal 2021 special funds in the amount of $250,000,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity (W911NF-21-9-0003).

NIKA Technologies,* Rockville, Maryland (W912DY-21-D-0017); Health Facilities Solutions, San Antonio, Texas (W912DY-21-D-0021); Polu Kai Tidewater,* Falls Church, Virginia (W912DY-21-D-0020); Vali Cooper International, Covington, Louisiana (W912DY-21-D-0018); VW International Inc., Alexandria, Virginia (W912DY-20-D-0019); and The Outfit Inc., New Braunfels, Texas (W912DY-21-D-0016), will compete for each order of the $50,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract to provide medical project support services, facility support services, quantity verification and analysis services, project development support services and commissioning support services. Bids were solicited via the internet with 15 received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Jan. 31, 2026. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Huntsville, Alabama, is the contracting activity.

AIR FORCE

Rolls-Royce Corp., Indianapolis, Indiana, has been awarded a $96,932,957 delivery order (FA8504-21-F-0022) to contract FA8504-17-D-0002 for C-130J propulsion long-term sustainment. This order provides funding for Option IV. Work will be performed at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, and is expected to be completed Jan. 31, 2022. Fiscal 2021 Special Operations Command operation and maintenance funds in the amount of $7,109,327; fiscal 2021 Air National Guard operation and maintenance funds in the amount of $22,126,544; fiscal 2021 Air Force Reserve operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $12,187,542; fiscal 2021 Air Force operation and maintenance funds in the amount of $54,486,354; and fiscal 2021 Special Operations Command research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $1,023,191 are being obligated at the time of award. Total cumulative face value of the contract is $66,684,503. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Robins AFB, Georgia, is the contracting activity.

Innovative Scientific Solutions Inc., Dayton, Ohio, has been awarded a not-to-exceed $44,195,532 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for Technology for Sustained Supersonic Combustion (TSSC). This is for the Technical Area 2 portion of TSSC. The mission of this TSSC effort focuses on development and evaluation of advanced aero propulsion systems and components, airframe structures, internal/external aerodynamics including integration into air vehicles, weapons and launch components with an emphasis on decreasing weigh and evaluating the effect of engine scale to determine operability, durability and performance. Work will be performed at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and is expected to be completed February 2028. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and four offers were received. The first task order will be incrementally funded with fiscal 2020 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $20,000 at time of award. Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8650-21-D-2401).

Cyber Systems and Services Solutions, Bellevue, Nebraska, has been awarded a $17,765,741 firm-fixed-price and cost-plus-fixed-fee modification (P0010) to contract FA8773-18-D-0002 to exercise Option Three for defensive cyber realization, integration and operational support services. Work will be performed at Joint Base San Antonio (JBSA)-Lackland, Texas, and is expected to be completed Feb. 28, 2022. This modification is the result of a competitive acquisition and seven offers were received. Fiscal 2021 operation and maintenance funds in the amount of $8,764,731 are being obligated at the time of award. The 38th Contracting Squadron, JBSA-Lackland, Texas, is the contracting activity.

University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio, has been awarded a $12,500,000 cost-reimbursement contract for “Photovoltaic Sheets for High-Specific-Power Space-Based Energy Harvesting (PVS-EH)”. This contract is to provide, develop and demonstrate the concept of PV “sheets” (PVS), consisting of modular, interconnect able, high-efficiency PV power sources fabricated on low-weight flexible substrates using scalable processing. Under this program, the contractor will further the effort to study and develop advanced materials, interfaces and electrical contacts for high efficiency and high specific power tandem thin film photovoltaic technologies to achieve lightweight solar sheet technologies that enable specific powers to exceed 1000 W/kg onboard spacecraft self- sensing, attribution and autonomy. Work will be performed in Toledo, Ohio, and is expected to be completed February 2026. Fiscal 2020 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $3,000,000 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, is the contracting activity (FA9453-21-C-0056).

Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Herndon, Virginia, has been awarded a $7,763,422 firm-fixed-price task order under the ground subsystems sustainment contract (FA8214-15-D-0001) for the Minuteman III Launch Control Center Block Upgrade production for the exercise of Option Year One of Malmstrom Wing I. Work will be performed in Ogden, Utah, and is expected to be completed Aug. 15, 2022. Fiscal 2021 missile procurement funds in the full amount are being obligated at the time of award. Total value of the task order after exercise of the previously mentioned option is $26,428,083. Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center, Hill Air Force Base, Utah, is the contracting activity (FA8204-20-F-0071).

CORRECTION: The contract modification (P00014) awarded to Gulfstream Aerospace Corp., Savannah, Georgia, Jan. 27, 2021, had an incorrect obligation amount. The operation and maintenance funds being obligated at the time of award should be $50,418,022, not $44,482,293 (FA8106-18-D-0002).

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Stryker Corp., Portage, Michigan, has been awarded a maximum $89,644,767 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for cranial and maxillofacial procedural packages and ancillary items. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S .Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a one-year contract with four one-year option periods. Location of performance is Michigan, with a Jan. 31, 2022, ordering period end date. Using military services are Army, Navy and Air Force. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2021 through 2022 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE2DE-21-D-0011).

Exxel Outdoors LLC,* Broomfield, Colorado, has been awarded a maximum $55,760,612 firm-fixed-priced, indefinite-delivery/definite-quantity contract for three-season sleep systems and components. This was a competitive acquisition with three responses received. This is a one-year base contract with four one-year option periods. Location of performance is Colorado, with a Jan. 28, 2022, ordering period end date. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2021 through 2022 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency, Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE1C1-21-D-1439).

SNC Manufacturing LLC,** Orocovis, Puerto Rico, has been awarded a maximum $41,007,805 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for trousers. This was a competitive acquisition with eight responses received. This is a one-year contract with four one-year option periods. Location of performance is Puerto Rico, with a Jan. 31, 2022, ordering period end date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2021 through 2022 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency, Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE1C1-21-D-1413).

*Small business
**Small disadvantaged business

https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Contracts/Contract/Article/2489417/source/GovDelivery/

On the same subject

  • Construction begins on new $131 million Air Force Expeditionary Capability facility at Canadian Forces Base Bagotville

    November 15, 2023 | International, Land

    Construction begins on new $131 million Air Force Expeditionary Capability facility at Canadian Forces Base Bagotville

    Today, Marie-France Lalonde, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence, on behalf of the Honourable Bill Blair, highlighted the construction of a new Air Force Expeditionary Capability facility at Canadian Forces Base Bagotville.

  • Finland and Sweden intensify talks on joint NATO application

    May 2, 2022 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

    Finland and Sweden intensify talks on joint NATO application

    The two countries are expected to announce a decision about joining the alliance in mid-May.

  • Arms control decisions by Trump administration could be ‘imminent.’ Will China be involved?

    February 27, 2020 | International, Other Defence

    Arms control decisions by Trump administration could be ‘imminent.’ Will China be involved?

    MINOT AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. — With a major arms control agreement between the U.S. and Russia set to expire next February, members of the nonproliferation community have been watching for signs that negotiations may begin in earnest. For those observers, some welcome news: Movement on the Trump administration's arms control plan is “imminent,” according to a senior defense official familiar with internal administration discussions. However, what that looks like appears to be up in the air: a short-term extension of the New START agreement with Russia; something that involves nuclear-armed China; a combination of those two; or all parties walking away entirely. “All the options are literally on the interagency table,” the official told Defense News on condition of anonymity. The New START agreement, signed in 2010, is an arms control pact between Russia and the U.S. that restricts each country to a total of 1,550 warheads deployed on bombers, submarines and in underground silos. Following the dissolution of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, New START is the only major nuclear arms control agreement left between the two nuclear powers. China has traditionally refused to sign onto arms control agreements. But Beijing has become a focus for those in Washington convinced that any new arms control agreement must include the Asian nation. China is estimated by the Federation of American Scientists to have 290 nuclear warheads, compared to more than 6,000 for Russia and the U.S. each, and the country is investing in nuclear modernization efforts. Though top Chinese officials made clear that Beijing will not participate in trilateral talks, U.S. President Donald Trump in December expressed optimism that a deal could happen, saying Chinese officials “were extremely excited about getting involved. ... So some very good things can happen with respect to that.” While traveling last week to tour the intercontinental ballistic missile fields at Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota, Defense Secretary Mark Esper declined to speculate on the state of negotiations and what he would recommend Trump do. But he did indicate there would be a meeting at his level “soon” on the issue. “If we proceed forward [with New START], we have to include Russia's new strategic weapons. They have to be included in the treaty. Number two, we should include Russia's nonstrategic nuclear weapons. They have nearly 2,000 of them,” Esper said. “Then I think we should put on the table: Can we bring China into the fold? We're trying to create strategic stability. It's hard to do that if you have a country of China's capacity and capability outside of that treaty.” Speaking at Minot later, Esper added: “If we want to preserve strategic stability using arms control as a counterpart of that, as a tool in that toolkit, then China should be in as well.” State of discussion While some have theorized that the Trump administration is trying to run out the clock on negotiations, the official ascribed the slow public movement to myriad “distractions” around Washington that has sucked attention from Trump, Esper and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. The official added that the outbreak of the coronavirus known as COVID-19, which originated in China, has made discussions with Chinese counterparts difficult. There have been ongoing meetings on the issue at the assistant secretary level across the Defense Department, the National Security Council, the State Department and the National Nuclear Security Administration. “Ultimate decisions haven't been taken yet, but [a proposal] should be imminent,” the official said. The first challenge, timewise, is the Feb. 5, 2021, expiration date for New START. Getting something done before then may be a challenge, especially if the goal is an expanded arms control agreement that loops in China, but “physically, you could do it because it doesn't require senate ratification, just a couple of notes signed by just getting everyone — the three sides — to agree to something,” the official said. The question of New START's fate is complicated by the desire to loop in China on a new agreement. Administration officials have been working to develop a compelling case for how to convince Beijing to join a trilateral nuclear deal. The argument largely comes in two forms. First, that if China does not sign onto a nuclear arrangement of some sort, it could lead Russia or the U.S. to consider growing their own arsenals — ensuring China's nuclear inferiority at a time when the Pacific power is racing to grow its stockpile. The second argument is that great powers work on nuclear agreements together — and so joining one as equals with Washington and Moscow should appeal to Beijing's desire for recognition on the global stage. Meia Nouwens, an expert on Chinese military affairs with the International Institute for Strategic Studies, says those two arguments are the most sensible ones to put forth to Beijing, particularly the appeal to China as a great power. She also speculated that if China's economy takes a downturn, it may find cooperating with the rules-based international system to be a “greater priority” than a China-first agenda. But, Nouwens predicts, “it will require the U.S. and Russia to make the first steps though before China decides to agree to reducing what it views as an already significantly smaller Chinese nuclear arsenal. The trust isn't there.” Rose Gottemoeller, who served as undersecretary of state for arms control and international security at the U.S. State Department during the Obama administration, before becoming deputy secretary general of NATO from 2016-2019, believes a careful calibration of what, exactly, is being negotiated will be key to any negotiation involving the Chinese. “I think you can make a case for the Chinese to come to the table early on intermediate-range constraints of ground-launched missiles because they are staring at the possibility of a deployment of very capable U.S. missiles of this kind,” she said at a January event hosted by the Defense Writers Group. “But I am concerned, they have so few warheads that if you put an emphasis on controlling their warheads, the incentive is for them to run the other direction rather than come to the table,” she added. Gottemoeller also indicated that the question of extending New START is a separate one from trying to bring China into the arms control fold. “The way the expansion program of New START is written, it's written so that it remains in place four to five years, so from '21 to '26, or until superseded by a new treaty. So it's not as if the administration is stuck with New START for another five years,” she said. “Go for it. Work on the new treaty. Get it done. And then New START would be superseded by the new treaty entering into force,” if ratified. “Let's just get on with what we need to do in negotiating new treaties. I am concerned that there will be a lot of gamesmanship going on, and as I said, the Russians are excellent in that kind of game as well,” she added. “Let us not play around with leverage in this case, but simply extend the thing for five years and then get done what we need to get done, which is to negotiate these new treaties." https://www.defensenews.com/pentagon/2020/02/26/arms-control-decisions-by-trump-administration-could-be-imminent-will-china-be-involved/

All news