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March 30, 2022 | Local, Aerospace

Canada picks F-35 as CF-18 fighter replacement

Canada has begun negotiations with Lockheed Martin and the US government to finalise the acquisition of 88 F-35As after selecting the fifth-generation type for its long-running fighter competition.

https://www.flightglobal.com/defence/canada-picks-f-35-as-cf-18-fighter-replacement/148073.article

On the same subject

  • Minister Garneau unveils Canada’s new drone safety regulations

    January 9, 2019 | Local, Aerospace, Security

    Minister Garneau unveils Canada’s new drone safety regulations

    Drone pilots to register their drones and obtain a pilot certificate by June 1, 2019 January 9, 2019             Ottawa              Transport Canada Transport Canada is committed to enhancing aviation and public safety while encouraging innovation and economic growth in the drone sector. Today, the Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, announced Canada’s new rules for remotely piloted aircraft systems, more commonly known as drones. The new rules, which will come into force on June 1, 2019, apply to all drone pilots flying drones between 250 grams and 25 kilograms that are operated within the drone pilot’s visual-line-of-sight, regardless of whether the drone is flown for fun, work or research. The new simplified rules reflect significant consultations with Canadians and the industry. The final regulations introduce two main categories of drone operation: basic and advanced. The categories are based on distance from bystanders and airspace rules. Both categories have their own set of easy-to-follow rules that will require the drone pilot to: register and mark the drone with its registration number; pass an online exam and get a pilot certificate for basic or advanced operations; be a minimum age of 14 for basic and 16 for advanced operations, unless supervised by a person having proper certificates; stay below an altitude of 122 m (400 feet) above ground level; and stay away from air traffic. Only drone pilots who need to fly a drone outside the rules for basic or advanced operations will need to apply for a Special Flight Operations Certificate (SFOC) before they fly. Transport Canada encourages drone pilots to take the necessary time to review and fully understand the new rules for drones in Canada and to follow a course provided by a drone flight school before attempting to take an online exam or flight review. Drone pilots will need to have their Pilot Certificate and proof of registration readily available when flying their drone as of June 1, 2019. This can mean having an electronic version available on their mobile device or carrying a printed copy. Transport Canada has developed an improved, user-friendly website with information on the new regulations and helpful tools for all drone pilots available at: Canada.ca/drone-safety. Transport Canada’s new drone services are available on our website. We invite drone pilots to create an account in the Drone Management Portal for easy access to these drone services at all times. Until the new rules come into force on June 1, 2019, recreational drone pilots must continue to follow the rules of the Interim Order Respecting the Use of Model Aircraft and pilots using their drone for work or research must continue to follow the conditions of their Special Flight Operations Certificate. All drone pilots are also subject to the Criminal Code as well as all provincial, territorial, and municipal laws governing areas such as privacy and trespassing. Endangering the safety of an aircraft is a serious offence. Anyone who violates the regulations could be subject to additional fines of up to $25,000 and/or prison. This applies to drones of any size used for any purpose. Quotes “We’ve listened closely to feedback from Canadians and have updated our regulations to balance practicality and the safe use of drones. Drones are part of an important economic sector with significant potential to improve lives and connect communities across the country. Our new regulations will create new opportunities for Canadians by establishing a safe and predictable regulatory environment where the industry can innovate and where recreational and non-recreational drone pilots can safely access Canadian airspace.” The Honourable Marc Garneau Minister of Transport https://www.canada.ca/en/transport-canada/news/2019/01/minister-garneau-unveils-canadas-new-drone-safety-regulations.html

  • Will other firms withdraw from fighter jet competition leaving F-35 last plane standing?

    September 25, 2019 | Local, Aerospace

    Will other firms withdraw from fighter jet competition leaving F-35 last plane standing?

    By DAVID PUGLIESE, OTTAWA CITIZEN  Shortly before he retired, Pat Finn, the Department of National Defence’s procurement chief, told this newspaper there was always a risk that some companies would drop out of the future fighter jet competition but that extra efforts had been made to ensure the process was fair. “We’re not getting all kinds of signals that (companies are) losing interest” in bidding, Finn said in an interview July 23. On Aug. 30, the United Kingdom’s Ministry of Defence and Airbus Defence and Space informed the Canadian government of their decision to withdraw from Canada’s future fighter competition. Airbus had been offering Canada the Eurofighter. At the time the Canadian Press news service reported the Eurofighter withdrawal was a surprise. It wasn’t. For the last nine months the various competing firms, Boeing, Airbus and Saab have been sounding the alarm about how the fighter jet process is structured and their worry that it is stacked in favour of the Lockheed Martin F-35. The RCAF, which originally selected the F-35 as the CF-18 replacement before that selection was put on hold by the previous Conservative government because of cost and technical issues, came up with the new requirements. Industry representatives say these requirements highlight the strengths of the F-35 such as stealth and a first strike capability. The primary role of the new fighter jets is to protect North America, or so government officials have said. Lockheed Martin’s industry rivals question how stealth and a first strike capability fit into that role. Representatives from Lockheed Martin’s competitors have also made overtures to federal officials about their concerns about the procurement process but say they received little response. In early July Reuters news service reported that both Airbus and Boeing were considering dropping out. Airbus followed through on its concerns and as noted decided it wasn’t worth competing because of how the process was designed. Last year the European firm Dassault informed the Canadian government it would not be competing in the competition. It had been planning to offer Canada the Rafale fighter jet. There were two key changes in the $19 billion procurement that caused Airbus to leave. One was the decision to change the industrial benefits needed for the program. Airbus was willing to outline and guarantee specific industrial benefits for Canada. That was the way previous defence procurements had worked. But that has been changed because of concerns the U.S. government raised for Lockheed Martin. U.S. officials had warned that the F-35 development agreement Canada signed years ago prohibits partners from imposing requirements for industrial benefits. Although Canada is a partner in the development of the aircraft that does not stipulate it is required to buy the F-35. But under the F-35 agreement, partner nations such as Canada are prohibited from demanding domestic companies receive specific work on the fighter jet. Instead, Canadian firms compete and if they are good enough they receive contracts. Over the last 12 years, Canadian firms have earned more than $1.3 billion in contracts to build F-35 parts. But there are no guarantees. The other problem that Airbus and Rafale faced was linked to the requirement that bidders need to show how their aircraft will integrate into the U.S.-Canada system to defend North America. Airbus would have been required to show how it planned to integrate the Eurofighter Typhoon into the U.S.-Canadian system without knowing the system’s full technical details, the Canadian Press news service pointed out. Saab, which is offering Canada the Gripen fighter, could be facing the same problem. Boeing, which is considering offering the Super Hornet, would not have such a problem as its aircraft is being flown by the U.S. military. It is still unclear, however, whether Boeing or Saab will even continue in the competition. Bids must be submitted by the spring of 2020 but there is a growing sense among the defence industry that the F-35 will ultimately be selected as the new aircraft for the RCAF. https://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/will-other-firms-withdraw-from-fighter-jet-competition-leaving-f-35-last-plane-standing

  • Government of Canada awards in-service support contract for Halifax-class LM2500 gas turbines

    August 16, 2021 | Local, Naval

    Government of Canada awards in-service support contract for Halifax-class LM2500 gas turbines

    /CNW/ - Through the National Shipbuilding Strategy, the Government of Canada is ensuring the members of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) have safe and effective...

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