7 septembre 2018 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR

Pentagon Report Shows China’s Continually Modernizing and Growing Military Capabilities

 By Dean Cheng

The Department of Defense has released the latest edition of its report on Chinese military and security developments.

Mandated in the fiscal 2000 National Defense Authorization Act, the annual report is an important source of regular updates regarding China’s growing military capabilities and its expanding range of security-related activities.

Since the People’s Republic of China halted the publication of its biennial defense white papers in 2015, there are few other good sources of information on one of the world’s largest militaries.

An important element of this year’s report is the expanded discussion of China’s security-related activities, providing a broader, fuller assessment. There is an extensive discussion of China’s Belt and Road Initiative, its array of investment projects previously known as the “One Belt, One Road Initiative,” stretching from China to Europe, into the Indian Ocean to Africa, and even across the Pacific to South America.

The report discusses the security implications of the Belt and Road Initiative, even though it is primarily a set of economic and political initiatives with limited direct military impact.

 

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This more comprehensive analysis is important, as it captures the Chinese whole-of-society approach to national security. To understand Beijing’s challenge to the U.S., it is vital to incorporate not only concerns about the People’s Liberation Army and the Chinese government, but also consideration of its diplomatic and economic engagement globally.

This year’s report also exemplifies why issuing an annual report is important. It highlights the various changes that have been undertaken since the announcement in December 2015 of a series of fundamental overhauls and reforms of the People’s Liberation Army. It thus provides a new snapshot of the various improvements and changes in the Chinese military as it continues to modernize all of its services.

Much discussed, for example, has been the steady extension of the People’s Liberation Army’s reach. News reports emphasized that it is acquiring systems that will allow it to strike the United States.

The report also notes that “one of the most significant [Navy] structural changes in 2017” has been the tripling of the size of the Chinese marine corps. Coupled with China’s first official overseas military base (in Djibouti), it is clear that China is expanding its force-projection capacity.

As important, however, have been the changes in the People’s Liberation Army’s organization and doctrine. This year’s report devotes substantial discussion to the evolving organization of PLA Army forces, as well as changes in the Central Military Commission, which manages the overall military.

These changes are fundamental, but have taken the past two years to become much more visible. The shift from divisions as the cornerstone of China’s ground forces to brigades had long been discussed, but only now is there sufficient evidence to gauge Beijing’s progress.

The changes in the Central Military Commission structure have been even more complex. When the changes were first announced, the commission initially appeared to be expanding from four general departments to 15 departments, commissions, and offices.

It is now clear, however, that in fact the commission has shrunk, with only seven members, rather than the pre-reform 10. Of particular note is the removal of the Logistics Work and Equipment Development departments from the main Central Military Commission structure.

Full article: https://www.cnsnews.com/commentary/dean-cheng/pentagon-report-shows-chinas-continually-modernizing-and-growing-military

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  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - June 17, 2019

    18 juin 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité, Autre défense

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - June 17, 2019

    DEFENSE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AGENCY Cisco Systems Inc., San Jose, California, was awarded a competitive, firm-fixed-price, single award, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (HC1084-19-D-0004) for Cisco Smart Net Total Care Joint Enterprise License Agreement (JELA) II.  The contract ceiling is $724,096,866.  The period of performance is for one base year period with a one-year option.  The period of performance for the base year is June 18, 2019, through June 17, 2020, and the option year follows consecutively through June 17, 2021.  The place of performance will be across the Department of Defense.  The solicitation was issued as other competitive action pursuant to the authority of 10 U.S. Code §2304(c)(1) and Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1, only one responsible source, and no other supplies or services, will satisfy agency requirements.  Four proposals were received.  Solicitation HC1084-19-R-0013 was posted on the Federal Business Opportunities website (www.fbo.gov).  The Defense Information Technology Contracting Organization, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, is the contracting activity (HC1084-19-D-0004). AIR FORCE General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc., Poway, California, has been awarded $90,961,866 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the United Kingdom (UK) MQ-9A Contractor Logistics Support Phase IV Program.  This contract provides for depot repair, life cycle sustainment, and software maintenance services for UK's MQ-9A fleet.  Work will be performed in Poway, California.  Performance and is expected to be completed Sept. 30, 2021.  This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition.  This contract involves 100 percent foreign military sales to the UK.  Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $90,961,866 are being obligated at the time of award.  The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8620-19-C-2003). Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems, Defense Electronic Systems Business Unit, Northridge, California, has been awarded a $38,950,511 indefinite-delivery requirements contract for Common Munition Built-In-Tester Reprogramming Equipment (CMBRE) production units.  This contract provides for the production of the following items associated with the CMBRE system:  AN/GYQ-79A CMBRE Plus, ADU-890/E, ADU-891-(V) 1/E, ADU-891-(V) 3/E, CMBRE initial spares kits and assorted items belonging to the CMBRE configuration.  Work will be performed in Northridge, California, and is expected to be complete by June 16, 2022.  This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition.  Fiscal 2019 procurement funds are being obligated via an individual delivery order against the production contract as requirements are made known.  The Air Force Lifecycle Management Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA8533-19-D-0009). Canadian Commercial Corp., Ottawa, Canada, on behalf of Honeywell Canada, has been awarded a $10,371,078 firm-fixed-price contract for C5 Super Galaxy Communication, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management Production.  This contract provides for the purchase of Honeywell Inmarsat satellite communication kits, interim contractor support, initial spares, data and program management.  Work will be performed in Ottawa, Canada, and is expected to be complete by Oct. 30, 2019.  This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition.  Fiscal 2019 procurement funds in the amount of $10,371,078 are being obligated at the time of award.  The Air Force Lifecycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8625-19-C-6607). NAVY Raytheon Missile Systems, Tucson, Arizona, is awarded $29,633,004 for cost-plus-fixed-fee delivery order N00019-19-F-2593 against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00019-15-G-0003).  This order provides for the upgrade of the Block IV Tomahawk test equipment, including the system Integration Laboratory, the Air Vehicle System Integration Laboratory, hot-benches, automated flight test equipment and associated test equipment.  Work will be performed in Tucson, Arizona (74.90 percent); Carlsbad, California (4.36 percent); Denver, Colorado (2.55 percent); Englewood, Colorado (1.56 percent); Mosheim, Tennessee (1.37 percent); Scottsdale, Arizona (1.34 percent); Irvine, California (1.03 percent); North Sutton, New Hampshire (1.02 percent); and various locations within the continental U.S. (11.87 percent), and is expected to be completed in June 2021.  Fiscal 2019 weapons procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $29,633,004 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the fiscal year.  The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. ARMY Oshkosh Defense LLC, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, was awarded a $21,709,189 fixed-price-incentive contract for Palletized Load System Trailers.  One bid was solicited with one bid received.  Work will be performed in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, with an estimated completion date of April 30, 2021.  Fiscal 2017 and 2019 other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $21,709,189 were obligated at the time of the award.  U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W56HZV-19-F-0468). SGS LLC,* Yukon, Oklahoma, was awarded a $13,456,297 firm-fixed-price contract for a design-bid-build construction project for the KC-46A Fuselage Trainer Facility Phase 3 at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma.  Bids were solicited via the internet with three received.  Work will be performed in Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma, with an estimated completion date of June 30, 2021.  Fiscal 2015, 2016 and 2019 Corps of Engineers civil construction funds in the amount of $13,456,297 were obligated at the time of the award.  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Tulsa, Oklahoma, is the contracting activity (W912BV-19-C-0011). R.E. Staite Engineering Inc.,* San Diego, California, was awarded a $7,052,735 firm-fixed-price contract for maintenance dredging the Redwood City Harbor Channel.  Bids were solicited via the internet with two received.  Work will be performed in Redwood City, California, with an estimated completion date of Oct. 9, 2019.  Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $7,052,735 were obligated at the time of the award.  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, San Francisco, California, is the contracting activity (W912P7-19-C-0010). DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY General Dynamics Land Systems Inc., Sterling Heights, Michigan, has been awarded an estimated $14,771,246 modification (P00036) to a three-year base contract (SPE7MX-16-D-0100) with two one-year option periods adding vehicle spare parts.  This is a firm-fixed-price, indefinite-quantity contract.  Locations of performance are Michigan and South Carolina, with an Aug. 11, 2020, performance completion date.  Using military service is Army.  Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds.  The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Land and Maritime, Columbus, Ohio. Eddy Pump Corp.,* El Cajon, California, has been awarded a maximum $8,427,827 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for pump assemblies.  This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1.  This is a three-year base contract with two one-year option periods.  Location of performance is California, with a June 16, 2022, performance completion date.  Using military service is Navy.  Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2022 Navy working capital funds.  The contracting activity is Defense Logistics Agency Land and Maritime, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania (SPRMM1-19-D-TR01). Alliant Techsystems Operations LLC, Plymouth, Minnesota, has been awarded a maximum $8,346,345 firm-fixed-price contract for automatic feeders.  This was a competitive acquisition with two responses received.  This is a one-year base contract with one one-year option period.  Locations of performance are Minnesota and Arizona, with a Sept. 10, 2021, performance completion date.  Using military service is Army.  Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2020 Army working capital funds.  The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Land and Maritime, Warren, Michigan (SPRDL1-19-C-042). *Small business https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1878725/source/GovDelivery/

  • Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group awarded support contract for Blue Angels’ ‘Fat Albert’ replacement

    10 juillet 2019 | International, Aérospatial

    Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group awarded support contract for Blue Angels’ ‘Fat Albert’ replacement

    Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group today announced it has been awarded the contract to support the entry into service of the new replacement for the Blue Angels’ iconic Fat Albert, the C-130 support aircraft to the US Navy’s air display team. Marshall will carry out the maintenance, paint and minor modifications to the US Navy’s replacement ‘Fat Albert’. The aircraft is a C-130J that the US Navy recently purchased from the UK Ministry of Defence to replace the C-130T that the squadron used for 17 years until May this year. The new Fat Albert is a C-130J Super Hercules, four-engine, six-blade turboprop, which will serve as the US Navy’s Blue Angels’ Flight Demonstration Squadron (NFDS) logistical support aircraft. Marshall is the global leading C-130 support company outside of the USA and was chosen for its proven expertise with C-130 modification, repair and overhaul (MRO) work and the speed with which the company can make the aircraft operational. Marshall Aerospace and Defence Group CEO, Alistair McPhee said: “We are delighted that the US Navy has chosen us to work on the new replacement Fat Albert,” “We have worked on Royal Air Force C-130s for 50 years and we support a number of international Air Force customers who have purchased surplus C-130s from the UK MOD. It feels like a natural progression for us, but very exciting nevertheless. Fat Albert is a head-turner and plays a major part in supporting the Blue Angels’ display team.” Lt. Col. Robert Hurst, PMA-207 C/KC-130 Deputy Program Manager, said: “Our partners at the UK MOD and Marshall have been instrumental in executing this extremely challenging acquisition. We have always had a great partnership with the UK and this only adds to the list of ways we accomplish great things together.” Fat Albert takes part in the display team’s flying performances, as well as being a crucial support aircraft, carrying the Blue Angels’ tools, spare parts and engineers. Marshall will perform depth maintenance on the aircraft, which will include an upgrade to some of its systems to align them to the retired Fat Albert. It will then be repainted in the Blue Angels’ iconic blue, yellow and white colours. Fat Albert is expected to be operational in the first part of next year. https://marshalladg.com/insights-news/marshall-aerospace-and-defence-group-awarded-support-contract-for-blue-angels-fat-albert-replacement

  • Armées : Florence Parly compte sur une hausse de ses crédits pour relancer l'industrie française

    16 avril 2020 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Armées : Florence Parly compte sur une hausse de ses crédits pour relancer l'industrie française

    Par Michel Cabirol  La ministre des Armées estime que son ministère aura un "rôle particulier à jouer lorsqu'il s'agira de relancer l'économie française". Pour l'heure, le budget des armées est épargné. C'est une première indication. Et elle est positive pour les armées et l'industrie de défense française. "Lorsque nous examinerons le prochain budget, je ne doute pas que certains de nos crédits de paiements auront augmenté, afin d'amplifier la relance", a assuré le 10 avril la ministre des Armées Florence Parly lors de son audition au Sénat. Premier investisseur de l'État, le ministère des armées aura "un rôle particulier à jouer lorsqu'il s'agira de relancer l'économie française", a-t-elle expliqué. close volume_off   Le ministère dispose, dans le cadre du programme 146 (Equipements militaires), "de moyens importants pour faire travailler aussi bien nos grandes industries de défense que le tissu de PME qui les entourent", a fait valoir Florence Parly. Car compte tenu de la récession qui s'annonce, le ministère des armées sera "un acteur clef, avec une responsabilité particulière", a-t-elle insisté. Interrogés par La Tribune, certains industriels de l'armement ne demandent ni plus, ni moins que le respect de la LPM (Loi de programmation militaire). Et ils rappellent que cette industrie produit 100% "Made in France" ou presque. L'industrie au service des armées Le ministère des Armées a demandé dès le début de la crise du Covid-19 aux industriels de la défense de maintenir leurs activités industrielles indispensables aux forces armées pour qu'elles poursuivent leurs missions. Florence Parly l'a redit vendredi dernier : "La continuité de l'industrie de la défense est essentielle à nos opérations". En outre, elle a demandé au délégué général pour l'armement de porter "une attention spéciale à la trésorerie des PME, et de réduire les délais de paiement". Pour suivre au plus près la santé financière et économique de la base industrielle et technologique de défense, le ministère a dressé une cartographie précise de la situation des entreprises. Le ministère porte également une attention à ses nombreux fournisseurs. Dans ce cadre, elle a demandé à ce que toutes les factures de moins de 5.000 euros soient traitées selon une procédure accélérée. "Depuis le 20 mars, nous en avons payé 22.000, pour un montant de 23 millions d'euros, a souligné Florence Parly. Hier, à Metz, la personne en charge de cette procédure m'a dit que 1.500 des 2.000 factures qui étaient en stock au début de la crise ont été réglées en quelques jours. Les équipes de la direction générale des finances publiques se montrent très réactives et assurent rapidement le paiement final".  Le budget des armées pour l'heure épargné Pour l'heure, le ministère est épargné au niveau budgétaire. Le premier projet de loi finances rectificative (PLFR), adopté il y a quelques jours, "n'a aucun impact sur le budget de mon ministère, a affirmé la ministre. Le second, qui sera présenté au prochain conseil des ministres, ne l'affectera pas davantage". En outre, a-t-elle souligné, "nous veillerons à ce que les réflexions sur le système de santé publique prennent en compte le service de santé des armées". D'une façon générale, il est "un peu tôt pour parler du coût de l'opération Résilience (notamment sur le programme 146, ndlr), d'autant qu'il faudra apprécier l'impact de cette crise sur le budget global des armées : certaines activités ont été moins importantes que prévu, aussi". https://www.latribune.fr/entreprises-finance/industrie/aeronautique-defense/armees-florence-parly-compte-sur-une-hausse-de-ses-credits-pour-relancer-l-industrie-francaise-845282.html

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