12 septembre 2023 | International, Aérospatial

UK, Japanese, Italian partners agree next steps for fighter jet | Reuters

Britain's BAE Systems , Japan's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries , and Italy's Leonardo have agreed the next steps to deliver the concept phase of a next-generation combat aircraft, BAE Systems said on Tuesday.

https://www.reuters.com/business/aerospace-defense/uk-japanese-italian-partners-agree-next-steps-fighter-jet-2023-09-12/

Sur le même sujet

  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - November 18, 2020

    18 novembre 2020 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - November 18, 2020

    NAVY General Dynamics, Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine, is awarded a $146,118,867 cost-plus-award-fee modification against previously awarded contract N00024-19-C-4452 for DDG planning yard services. Work will be performed in Bath, Maine, and is expected to be completed by January 2022. Fiscal 2020 other procurement (Navy) (80%); and fiscal 2021 operation and maintenance (Navy) (20%), funding in the amount of $1,016,645 will be obligated at time of award, of which $200,866 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair, Bath, Maine, is the contracting activity. Lockheed Martin Corp., Liverpool, New York, is awarded a $22,827,962 modification (P00003) to a firm-fixed-price order N00019-20-F-0535 against previously issued basic ordering agreement N00019-19-G-0029. This modification exercises an option to procure 12 retrofit advanced radar processor systems for the E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft. Work will be performed in Liverpool, New York (54%); and Andover, Massachusetts (46%), and is expected to be completed in April 2025. Fiscal 2021 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $22,827,962 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Lockheed Martin Corp., Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, is awarded an $11,977,622 modification (P00003) to previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract N00019-20-C-0026. This modification provides continued support required to establish the common reprogramming tool development network and selection of a service-oriented architecture for the development of enhanced reprogramming tools, which is essential for all standing labs in support of the F-35 aircraft for the Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and the governments of Australia and Great Britain. Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas (90%); and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida (10%), and is expected to be completed in December 2021. Fiscal 2021 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funds in the amount of $711,406; fiscal 2021 research, development, test and evaluation (Air Force) funds in the amount of $711,406; and non-Department of Defense funds in the amount of $2,800,000, will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Rolling Meadows, Illinois, is awarded an $8,456,902 modification (P00010) to cost-plus-fixed-fee delivery order N00019-19-F-0453 against previously issued basic ordering agreement N00019-15-G-0026. This modification adds scope to provide non-recurring engineering to upgrade the current large aircraft infrared countermeasures system processor replacement in support of efforts to resolve advanced threat warning processor and control indicator unit diminishing manufacturing source issues, and exercises an option to provide expanded growth capability for the AN/AAQ-24 system for the Navy and the Air Force. Work will be performed in Rolling Meadows, Illinois, and is expected to be completed in April 2023. Fiscal 2019 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $5,075,661; fiscal 2020 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $2,961,241; and fiscal 2020 aircraft procurement (Air Force) funds in the amount of $420,000, will be obligated at time of award; $5,075,661 of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. ARMY BAE Systems, Nashua, New Hampshire, was awarded a $49,937,097 firm-fixed-price contract for the Common Missile Warning System. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 15, 2025. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-21-D-0010). General Dynamics Land Systems, Sterling Heights, Michigan, was awarded a $25,982,972 modification (P00004) to contract W56HZV-20-C-0031 to provide maintenance training and procedural technical assistance to the Kuwait Land Force. Work will be performed in Kuwait City, Kuwait, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 5, 2023. Fiscal 2010 Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $25,982,972 were obligated at the time of the award. The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Detroit Arsenal, Michigan, is the contracting activity. MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY ARES Technical Services Corp.,* Burlingame, California, is being awarded a $51,962,387 competitive cost-plus-fixed-fee, level-of-effort contract with a three-year base value of $21,651,531 and two one-year options for Technical, Engineering, Advisory, and Management Support (TEAMS) - Next Safety advisory and assistance services. The work will be performed in Fort Belvoir, Virginia; Dahlgren, Virginia; Huntsville, Alabama; Fort Greely, Alaska; Vandenberg Air Force Base, California; Kirkland AFB, New Mexico; Pacific Missile Range Facility, Hawaii; and White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 13, 2025. This contract was competitively procured via publication on the beta.SAM.gov website with three proposals received. Fiscal 2021 research, development, test and evaluation; and Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $2,599,751 are being obligated at time of award. The Missile Defense Agency, Huntsville, Alabama, is the contracting activity (HQ0858-21-C-0011). AIR FORCE L‐3 Communications Vertex Aerospace LLC, Madison, Mississippi, has been awarded a $38,000,000 firm-fixed‐price, indefinite‐delivery/indefinite‐quantity modification (P00021) to contract FA8106‐17‐D‐0001 for contractor logistic support of the Air Force C‐12 fleet. Work will be performed in Madison, Mississippi; San Angelo, Texas; Okmulgee, Oklahoma; Buenos Ares, Argentina; Gaborone, Botswana; Brasilia, Brazil; Bogota, Colombia; Cairo, Egypt; Accra, Ghana; Tegucigalpa, Honduras; Budapest, Hungary; Joint Base Andrews, Maryland; Nairobi, Kenya; Rabat, Morocco; Manila, Philippines; Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Bangkok, Thailand; Ankara, Turkey; Edwards Air Force Base, California; Holloman AFB, New Mexico; Joint Base Elmendorf‐Richardson, Alaska; Oslo, Norway; and Yokota Air Base, Japan. Work is expected to be completed by Dec. 31, 2021. The estimated cumulative face value of the contract is $158,000,000. Fiscal 2021 operation and maintenance in the amount of $6,648,772 will be obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, is the contracting activity. Engineering Arresting Systems Corp., Ashton, Pennsylvania, has been awarded a $15,691,772 requirements-indefinite-delivery type, firm‐fixed-price production contract for the Mobile Runway Edge Sheave (MRES). Work will be performed in Ashton, Pennsylvania, and is expected to be completed Nov. 15, 2028. This contract is the result of a sole-source acquisition. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA8534-21-D-0001). DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Burlington Apparel Fabrics, Greensboro, North Carolina, has been awarded a maximum $9,602,250 modification (P00010) exercising the second one-year option period of a one-year base contract (SPE1C1-19-D-1113) with four one-year option periods for cloth. This is a firm-fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract. Location of performance is North Carolina, with a Nov. 18, 2021, ordering period end date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2021 through 2022 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. *Small business https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Contracts/Contract/Article/2416815/source/GovDelivery/

  • What could a military do with this flying saucer?

    14 août 2019 | International, Aérospatial

    What could a military do with this flying saucer?

    By: Kelsey D. Atherton This may be a flying saucer, but don't call it a UFO. Carefully named, the All DIrections Flying Object, or ADIFO, is instead a saucer-like contraption, a flying prototype built at exploring the aerodynamic potential of an alien craft. It is, at its core, an omnidirectional flying wing built around a quadcopter with jets attached. Its designers see a future for the airframe as an unmanned combat aerial vehicle. In a video posted July 1, a narrator discusses the design process and aerodynamics of the craft. Like many VTOL tools built on a quadcopter frame, ducted fans provide initial lift and mobility at low altitudes and low speeds. The addition of vectored jets on the rear of the craft, combined with four vertical vents and four side-facing vents, promising greater maneuverability at high speeds. The ADIFO is the invention of Romanian engineer Razan Sabie in conjunction with Iosif Taposu, a scientist with a long career in aerospace research for the Romanian government. “The aerodynamics behind this aircraft is the result of more than two decades of work and is very well reasoned in hundreds of pages and confirmed by computer simulations and wind tunnel tests,” Sabie told Vice, in the pair's first American interview. That story explores both the specific nature of the ADIFO, and the long and mostly failed history of flying saucer design. Like many other ideas for the first decades of aviation, the possibility of operating the craft without a human on board opens up greater potential in what an airframe can actually do. Human pilots are subject to the limitations of a body and perception, and a flying disk changing directions suddenly at high speed is not the ideal place for a human to be. Uncrewed craft can take on novel forms, and execute turns and twists beyond those human limits. While maneuverability is likely the primary selling point for a future role as combat aircraft, the smooth and fin-free form could easily have stealth characteristics built in, and could be further adapted by a dedicated team to fully realizing that stealth flight. What might a military planner or designer do with such a machine? The proof-of-concept offers little in the way of information about storage space or sensors. With wide enough lenses, a handful of cameras could match the circular symmetry of the vehicle and provide and omnidirectional surveillance presence. The high speeds and potentially low radar profile suggest a role akin to earlier, Cold War spy planes, taking specific pictures in contested space and returning before anti-air systems can act. And as with any aircraft, the potential is likely there for it to release an explosive payload, taking the flying saucer from an extraterrestrial fear to a terrestrial threat. ADIFO might not be the future of anything. The project's home page says the team is still attracting partners, and aviation history is littered with proofs-of-concept that failed to materialize in a meaningful way. Yet there is something to the idea of a flying saucer working the moment it no longer has to transport a human. It is an old aviation frontier that likely warrants further exploration. https://www.c4isrnet.com/unmanned/2019/08/12/what-might-a-military-want-with-a-romanian-flying-saucer/

  • All aboard the Sea Train!

    2 juin 2020 | International, Naval

    All aboard the Sea Train!

    Imagine the following scenario. Four medium-sized U.S. Navy vessels depart from a port along the United States' coast. There's no crew aboard any of them. About 15 nautical miles off the coast, the four vessels rendezvous, autonomously arranging themselves in a line. Using custom mechanisms, they attach to each other to form a train, except they're in the water and there's no railroad to guide them. In this configuration the vessels travel 6,500 nautical miles across the open ocean to Southeast Asia. But as they approach their destination, they disconnect, splitting up as each unmanned ship goes its own way to conduct independent operations, such as collecting data with a variety of onboard sensors. Once those operations are complete, the four reunite, form a train and make the return journey home. This is the Sea Train, and it may not be as far-fetched as it sounds. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is investing in several technologies to make it a reality. “The goal of the Sea Train program is to be able to develop and demonstrate long-range deployment capabilities for a distributed fleet of medium-sized tactical unmanned vessels,” said Andrew Nuss, DARPA's program manager for Sea Train. “So we're really focusing on ways to enable extended transoceanic transit and long-range naval operations, and the way that we're looking to do that is by taking advantage of some of the efficiencies that we can gain in a system of connected vessels — that's where the name ‘Sea Train' comes from.” According to DARPA, the current security environment has incentivized the Navy and the Marine Corps to move from a small number of exquisite, large manned platforms to a more distributed fleet structure comprised of smaller vessels, including unmanned platforms that can conduct surveillance and engage in electronic warfare and offensive operations. While these unmanned vessels are smaller and more agile than their large, manned companions, they are limited by the increased wave-making resistance that plagues smaller vessels. And due to their size, they simply can't carry enough fuel to make the long-range journeys envisioned by DARPA without refueling. By connecting the vessels — physically or in a formation — the agency hopes the Sea Train can reduce that wave resistance and enable long-range missions. In February, the agency released a broad agency announcement to find possible vendors. Citing agency practice, Nuss declined to share how many proposals were submitted, although he did say there was significant interest in the announcement. The agency completed its review of any submissions and expects to issue contracts by the end of the fiscal year. Sea Train is expected to consist of two 18-month periods, where contractors will work to develop and test technologies that could enable the Sea Train concept. The program will culminate with model testing in scaled ocean conditions. If successful, DARPA hopes to see the technologies adopted by the Navy for its unmanned platforms. “What we're looking to do is be able to reduce the risk in this unique deployment approach,” Ness said. “And then be able to just deliver that set of solutions to the Navy in the future, to be able to demonstrate to them that there is, potentially, a new way to deploy these vessels, to be able to provide far more operational range without the risk of relying on actual refueling or in-port refueling.” And while DARPA's effort is focused on medium-sized unmanned vessels — anywhere from 12 to 50 meters in length — the lessons learned could be applied to larger or smaller vessels, manned or unmanned. https://www.c4isrnet.com/unmanned/2020/06/01/all-aboard-the-sea-train/

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