29 mars 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité, Autre défense

Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - March 26, 2019

NAVY

Huntington Ingalls Industries, Pascagoula, Mississippi, was awarded a $1,471,290,677 fixed-price-incentive modification to previously awarded contract N00024-18-C-2406 for the procurement of the detail design and construction of Landing Platform Dock (LPD) 30, the first LPD 17 Flight II ship which will meet all the capabilities and capacities requirements for the Amphibious Ship Replacement. Work will be performed in Pascagoula, Mississippi (82 percent); Crozet, Virginia (3 percent); Beloit, Wisconsin (2 percent); and New Orleans, Louisiana (2 percent), with other efforts performed at various sites less than one percent throughout the U.S. (11 percent), and is expected to be completed by February 2025. Fiscal 2018 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy) funding in the amount of $1,369,362,790 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. (Awarded March 25, 2019)

Raytheon Co., Indianapolis, Indiana, was awarded a $49,989,867 firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract in support of radar antenna system overhauls, coatings, shipboard installations and removals, and incidental technical support services for the following Radar Restoration Program systems: AN/SPS-48, AN/SPS-49, AN/SPS-67(V)1, AN/SPS-40, AN/SPS-73, AN/SPS-67(V)3/5, AN/SPQ-9B, AN/SPS-55, AN/SPS-75 and AN/SPS-77. All systems in the Radar Restoration Program are in the sustainment phase of their life cycle. The restored systems provided via this contract action are the above-deck components. The systems, subsystems, subassemblies and components are critical shipboard systems providing detect-to-engage capability to defend against incoming enemy aircraft and/or missiles. Some systems provide safe navigation processes for collision avoidance. This contract involves foreign military sales to Taiwan. Work will be performed in Odon, Indiana (75 percent); and Indianapolis, Indiana (25 percent), and is expected to be completed by March 2024. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) funding in the amount of $271,807; and foreign military sales funding in the amount of $436,602 will be obligated at time of award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with three offers received. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, Indiana, is the contracting activity (N00164-19-D-WP40). (Awarded March 22, 2019)

The Raytheon Co., McKinney, Texas, is awarded $39,718,809 for modification P00036 to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N00019-15-C-0116). This modification exercises an option for the procurement of three APY-10 Radar System production kits for the Navy, four for the government of the United Kingdom, and five for the government of Norway, as well as related services in support of P-8A Poseidon Lot 10 production aircraft. Work will be performed in McKinney, Texas (77.1 percent); Andover, Massachusetts (7.2 percent); Chelmsford, Massachusetts (3.4 percent); Woodland Park, New Jersey (3.3 percent); Black Mountain, North Carolina (1.8 percent); San Carlos, California (1.7 percent); Ashburn, Virginia (1.6 percent); Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada (1.4 percent); Simsbury, Connecticut (1.3 percent); and Clearwater, Florida (1.2 percent), and is expected to be completed in September 2022. Fiscal 2019 aircraft procurement (Navy); and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) funds in the amount of $39,718,809 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This modification combines purchases for the Navy ($9,168,076; 23 percent); and FMS ($30,550,733; 77 percent). The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.

National Institute of Building Sciences, Washington, District of Columbia, is awarded a maximum amount $25,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for architectural design and engineering services for the National Institute of Building Sciences, District of Columbia. The work to be performed provides for ongoing criteria preparation and shall fall under the following two categories: preparation and dissemination of emerging innovative technology source information and/or criteria, commercially supported, embedded within the whole building design guide; and make findings and advise public/private sectors of the economy with respect to the use of building science and technology in achieving nationally acceptable standards and the irregularities and inconsistencies which arise from their application to particular localities or special local conditions. Work will be performed in Washington, District of Columbia. The term of the contract is not to exceed 60 months with an expected completion date of March 2024. Fiscal 2015 Office of the Secretary of Defense contract funds in the amount of $5,000 are obligated on this award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. No task orders are being issued at this time. Future task orders will be primarily funded by military construction funds. This contract was a sole-source procurement under Federal Acquisition Regulations 6.302-5, authorized or required by statute. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Atlantic, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (N62470-19-D-5013).

BAE Systems, Information and Electronic Systems Integration, Nashua, New Hampshire, is being awarded an $18,184,174 firm-fixed-price contract for the procurement of nine OE-120B/UPX Identification Friend or Foe antenna groups and one retrofit kit for the Navy. Work will be performed in Nashua, New Hampshire, and is expected to be completed in May 2022. Fiscal 2017, 2018, and 2019 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy); and fiscal 2019 other procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $18,184,174 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was not competitively procured pursuant to Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity (N00019-19-C-0052).

Noble Sales Co. Inc.,* Rockland, Massachusetts, is awarded a $14,126,593 firm-fixed-price blanket purchase agreement contract to stock, store, and issue supplies, construction materials, and hardware in support of Naval Facilities Engineering Command Hawaii, Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam, Oahu, Hawaii. The contract will include a 12-month base period, four one-year option periods, and a six-month extension, which if exercised, the total value of this contract will be $79,409,916. Work will be performed in Oahu, Hawaii, and is expected to be completed by March 2020; if all options are exercised, work will be completed by September 2024. Fiscal 2019 working capital (Navy) funds will be provided on individual task orders as they are issued against the agreement and funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was solicited unrestricted to all General Services Administration (GSA) Federal Supply Schedule vendors under GSA Schedule Special Item Number 51V for maintenance, repairs, and operations with two offers received. Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center Pearl Harbor, Regional Contracting Department, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is the contracting activity (N00604-19-A-4000).

QRC Technologies, Fredericksburg, Virginia, is awarded a $13,748,268 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee, firm-fixed-price contract for the purchase of QRC brand materials and components, hardware deliverables, and engineering services required to support design, upgrade, integration, test, and evaluation of sensor system integration projects for the U.S. Special Operations Command and the Navy. This three-year contract includes a two-year option which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to an estimated $21,660,140. All work will be performed in Fredericksburg, Virginia. The period of performance of the base period is from March 27, 2019, through March 26, 2022. If the option is exercised, the period of performance would extend through March 26, 2024. Contract funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Funding will be obligated via task/delivery orders. The types of funding to be obligated include operations and maintenance (Navy); other procurement (Navy); and research, development, test and evaluation (Navy). This sole-source procurement is issued using other than full and open competition in accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulation Subpart 6.302-1 and 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1) - only one responsible source. The Naval Information Warfare Center Pacific, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity (N66001-19-D-3403).

Raytheon Co., Tewksbury, Massachusetts, is awarded a $9,140,826 modification to previously-awarded contract N00024-17-C-5145 to exercise options for DDG 1000 ship class integrated logistics support and engineering services. The DDG 1000 ship class is a multi-mission surface combatant designed to fulfill volume firepower and precision strike requirements. DDG 1000 combat systems provide offensive, distributed and precision firepower and long ranges in support of forces ashore, while incorporating signature reduction, active and passive self-defense systems and enhanced survivability features. Work will be performed in Portsmouth, Rhode Island (50 percent); and Tewksbury, Massachusetts (50 percent), and is expected to be completed by March 2020. Fiscal 2019 other procurement (Navy); and fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funding in the amount of $5,772,655 will be obligated at time of award, and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity.

AIR FORCE

Sierra Nevada Corp., Circle, Sparks, Nevada, has been awarded a $317,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for the Precision Strike Package program. This contract provides contractor logistics support for the Precision Strike Package in support of the AC-130W and AC-130J. Work will be performed at Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico; and Hurlburt Field, Florida, and is expected to be complete by Sept. 30, 2026. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $26,784,295 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA8509‐19‐D‐0001).

DZYNE Technologies Inc., Fairfax, Virginia, has been awarded a $48,990,806 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for Mobile Onboard Nexus for Autonomy and Radical Computation Handling (MONARCH) Small Business Innovative Research III effort. This contract provides for further development of technologies they have established under previous and current contracts, and the rapid development and maturation of novel Airborne, Space, and Terrestrial (ground) technologies and systems so that MONARCH technologies and associated capabilities can be transitioned to military markets. Work will be performed in Irvine, California, and is expected to be complete by March 27, 2024. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8650-19-C-9203). (Awarded March 25, 2019)

General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc., Poway, California, has been awarded a $9,211,561 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the United Kingdom (UK) MQ-9 Reaper contractor logistics support effort. This contract provides for ongoing sustainment of the UK MQ-9 fleet. Work will be performed at multiple stateside and international locations, and is expected to be completed by June 30, 2019. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition and involves 100 percent foreign military sales to the government of the United Kingdom. Foreign military sales funds in the full amount are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8620-15-G-4040 0017 21).

ARMY

Valiant Global Defense Services Inc., San Diego, California, was awarded a $60,685,000 modification (P00013) to contract W91247-18-C-0001 for mission support services. Work will be performed in Fort Polk, Louisiana, with an estimated completion date of March 26, 2023. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $60,685,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Mission and Installation Contracting Command, Fort Polk, Louisiana, is the contracting activity.

Up-Side Management Co.,* Hubert, North Carolina, was awarded a $46,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for general construction and repair. Bids were solicited via the internet with 33 received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of March 25, 2024. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W91278-19-D-0017).

Widman Inc.,* Godfrey, Illinois, was awarded a $30,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for upper-river land repair. Bids were solicited via the internet with seven received. Work will be performed in West Alton, Missouri, with an estimated completion date of March 25, 2024. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $30,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Louis, Missouri, is the contracting activity (W912P9-19-D-0003).

Widman Inc.,* Godfrey, Illinois, was awarded a $15,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for lower-river land repair. Bids were solicited via the internet with five received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of March 25, 2024. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Louis, Missouri, is the contracting activity (W912P9-19-D-0004).

Mississippi Department of Rehabilitation Services, Madison, Mississippi, was awarded a $14,523,875 firm-fixed-price contract for dining facility management functions. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2024. U.S. Property and Fiscal Office for Mississippi is the contracting activity (W9127Q-19-D-0001).

BAE Systems Ordnance Systems Inc., Kingsport, Tennessee, was awarded a $9,576,532 modification (P00681) to contract DAAA09-98-E-0006 for natural gas and fuel oil for the commissioning and emission testing of the new natural gas-fired steam plant currently under construction at Holston Army Ammunition Plant. Work will be performed in Kingsport, Tennessee, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2021. Fiscal 2018 other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $9,576,532 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, is the contracting activity.

Avion Solutions Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, was awarded an $8,656,308 modification (000006) to contract W31P4Q-18-A-0047 for logistics support. Work will be performed in Huntsville, Alabama, with an estimated completion date of March 28, 2020. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, Army; other procurement, Army; and research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $8,656,308 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity.

MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY

Lockheed Martin Corp., Sunnyvale, California, was awarded a $30,000,000 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract modification (P00015) to a previously awarded HQ0277-18-C-0001 contract. The value of this contract is increased from $36,000,000 to $66,000,000. Under this modification, the contractor will complete their laser scaling and beam control critical design review in support of the Low Power Laser Demonstrator risk reduction. The work will be performed in Sunnyvale, California. The period of performance for this effort is Oct. 6, 2017, to Sept. 6, 2019. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $29,951,935 are being obligated on this award. The Missile Defense Agency, Albuquerque, New Mexico, is the contracting activity.

General Atomics, San Diego, California, was awarded a $29,000,000 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract modification (P00017) to a previously awarded HQ0277-18-C-0002 contract. The value of this contract is increased from $33,000,000 to $62,000,000. Under this modification, the contractor will complete their laser scaling and beam control critical design review in support of the Low Power Laser Demonstrator risk reduction. The work will be performed in San Diego, California. The period of performance for this effort is Nov. 6, 2017, to Sept. 6, 2019. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $28,955,517 are being obligated on this award. The Missile Defense Agency, Albuquerque, New Mexico, is the contracting activity.

Boeing Co., Huntsville, Alabama, was awarded a $29,000,000 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract modification (P00019) to a previously awarded HQ0277-18-C-0003 contract. The value of this contract is increased from $33,000,000 to $62,000,000. Under this modification, the contractor will complete their laser scaling and beam control critical design review in support of the Low Power Laser Demonstrator risk reduction. The work will be performed in Huntsville, Alabama. The period of performance for this effort is Dec. 8, 2017, to Sept. 6, 2019. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $28,685,504 are being obligated on this award. The Missile Defense Agency, Albuquerque, New Mexico, is the contracting activity.

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Oshkosh Defense LLC, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, has been awarded a maximum $11,789,305 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for diesel engines. This is a three-year contract with no option periods. This was a sole-source acquisition, using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. Location of performance is Wisconsin, with a March 26, 2022, performance completion date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2022 Army working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Land and Maritime, Warren, Michigan (SPRDL1-19-D-0084).

CACI Inc.-Federal, Chantilly, Virginia, has been awarded a $10,031,056 firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-incentive-fee contract for technical and functional services for the Defense Agency Initiative. This was a competitive acquisition with one response received. This is a one-year base contract with three one-year option periods. Locations of performance are Virginia and other areas in the continental U.S., with a March 28, 2020, performance completion date. Using customer is Defense Logistics Agency. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds; and fiscal 2019 through 2020 research, development, test and evaluation funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Contracting Services Office, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SP4701-19-C-0009).

Beaver Aerospace & Defense Inc.,* Livonia, Michigan, has been awarded a maximum $9,036,355 firm-fixed-price contract for linear electro-mechanical actuators. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a one-year base contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Michigan, with a July 19, 2022, performance completion date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Richmond, Virginia (SPE4A6-19-C-0071).

*Small business

https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1796426/

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