30 juin 2020 | Local, Naval

Canada awards contract to support Halifax-class ship maintenance

Canada awards contract to support Halifax-class ship maintenance

As outlined in Canada's defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged, the Government of Canada is committed to equipping the Canadian Armed Forces with modern and capable equipment needed to support its operations.

As outlined in Canada's defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged, the Government of Canada is committed to equipping the Canadian Armed Forces with modern and capable equipment needed to support its operations. This includes supporting the Royal Canadian Navy's (RCN) fleet of combat vessels to ensure they remain operationally effective and capable until the transition to its future fleet is complete.

Today, the Government of Canada announced the award of an in-service support contract to Fleetway Inc. of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Valued at $72.6 million for the first six years, with options to extend for up to 22 years, this contract will provide a full range of technical data management and systems engineering support services for the RCN's fleet of Halifax-class ships. This contract will secure an expert team to store and manage thousands of critical ship documents, in addition to producing complex designs to support the installation of new equipment on board the ships. Their specialized knowledge and skills will make sure key information is up-to-date to support maintenance teams, and will enable the maintenance of the Halifax-class operational capability in support of CAF missions.

Awarded as part of the National Shipbuilding Strategy, this contract will ensure that the RCN and supporting shipyards continue to have the technical data required to support ongoing ship maintenance during planned docking work periods, while also providing local economic benefits. Work for the contract began in April 2020, and will continue until the fleet is retired in the early 2040s. This contract is expected to sustain an estimated 140 Canadian jobs.

Quotes

“The women and men of the Canadian Armed Forces deserve the best equipment and tools available. By investing in our fleet of Halifax class frigates, we will be able to provide our members in uniform what they need to continue advancing peace and security around the world. Our government's defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged is delivering real results for Canadians and those who protect us.”

The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National Defence

“The National Shipbuilding Strategy continues to support the members of the Royal Canadian Navy and is reinvigorating the marine industry. This engineering service contract award to Fleetway Inc. of Halifax, Nova Scotia, will help provide our navy with safe, reliable ships to carry out their important work on behalf of the Government of Canada, while also creating jobs and generating significant economic benefits in the regions of Canada.”

The Honourable Anita Anand, Minister of Public Services and Procurement

“Our Halifax-class frigates remain the backbone of our Navy, enabling us to maintain our presence at sea both at home and abroad. As we continue to transition to our future fleet, it is essential that we continue to foster an environment that enables the RCN to keep our frigates floating, moving, and fighting. Fleetway Inc. brings world class technical data management and systems engineering support services which will help to ensure the RCN is ready to help, ready to lead and ready to fight.”

Vice-Admiral Art McDonald, Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy

“Nova Scotians are deeply proud of the women and men in the Canadian Armed Forces, and it's fitting that companies across the province are providing important support to the National Shipbuilding Strategy. This contract with Fleetway Inc. will keep skilled workers employed here at home, while supporting the Canadian Armed Forces in their work abroad.”

Darren Fisher, Member of Parliament for Dartmouth-Cole Harbour

Quick facts

  • An initial contract of $72.6 million has been awarded to Fleetway Inc. for their services. It will be amended over the contract period based on the amount of work required for a total value of up to $552 million. This type of contract is fully compliant with our Sustainment Initiative, which ensures performance, value for money, flexibility, and economic benefits.

  • This contract is one of more than 100 existing support contracts required to effectively support maintenance of the Halifax-class.

  • This new in-service support contract will replace the services provided by Fleetway Inc. through the previous in-service support contract that will expire in October 2020. The new contract was awarded through an open, fair, and transparent procurement process.

  • All technical documentation, manuals, and engineering drawings of ship systems/equipment must be regularly updated to track any changes following maintenance or upgrades. This information is used to help monitor the state of the ship, and is also used by maintenance crews to support ongoing work.

  • Halifax-class ships monitor and control Canadian waters, defend Canada's sovereignty, facilitate large-scale search and rescue activities, and provide emergency assistance when needed. The ships operate with and integrate into the United Nations, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and coalitions of allied states in support of international peace and security operations. Introduced into service in the 1990s, the Canadian-built Halifax-class ships were recently modernized to remain operationally effective and relevant until the Canadian Surface Combatants enter into service.

  • The Canadian Surface Combatants will replace the Halifax-class frigates and the retired Iroquois-class destroyers, and will ensure the RCN has modern and capable ships to monitor and defend Canada's waters, to continue to contribute to international naval operations for decades to come, and to rapidly deploy credible naval forces worldwide on short notice.

https://www.miragenews.com/canada-awards-contract-to-support-halifax-class-ship-maintenance/

Sur le même sujet

  • Pandemic equipment snarls will rewrite Canada's definition of national security needs, say experts

    9 avril 2020 | Local, Sécurité

    Pandemic equipment snarls will rewrite Canada's definition of national security needs, say experts

    When every country needs the same stuff to keep people safe, cost arguments seem less convincing The mad scramble to secure protective medical equipment and ventilators in the midst of a global pandemic has given some of the people who work in the usually tedious world of government procurement an unwelcome excuse to say, "I told you so." For years, there have been quiet but persistent demands coming out of the defence and acquisition sectors for successive federal governments to develop a list of "strategic industries" that do not have to rely on foreign supply chains — as insurance against the kind of procurement panic in play right now. Those calls were largely ignored. Now, defence experts are saying the COVID-19 crisis is a costly wake-up call. Canada needs — and has needed for almost two decades — a 21st century national security industrial plan that focuses on critical equipment and materials that should be produced at home, not abroad. 'Totally negligent' "We've been totally negligent on that and it is something I have articulated over and over again," said Alan Williams, the former head of the procurement branch at the Department of National Defence. "It's absolutely critical and if this doesn't wake us to that reality, I don't know what would." Williams devoted a substantial portion of one of his books, Reinventing Canadian Defence Procurement: A View from the Inside, to the absence of a national security vision of Canadian industry. "It frankly pisses me off because there's no reason for us not to have done that," he said. "That should be the kind of thing ministers, the leaders of the country desperately want to do. And why we seem to have avoided that kind of strategic thinking ... It just boggles my mind. It's inexcusable." 'Key' industries geared toward trade, not tragedies There was a faint glimmer of hope in the initial debate over the National Shipbuilding Strategy a decade ago, when the former Conservative government made a conscious decision to build future warships, Canadian Coast Guard and fisheries vessels in Canada, instead of outsourcing the work to other countries. At least in the context of defence procurement, Canada does have what are known as "key industrial capabilities", including shipbuilding, the production of certain types of ammunition and the construction of a range of aerospace and maritime electronic systems. Much of the work of those "key" domestic industries is, however, geared toward making high-end components for global supply chains. Critics have often said the policy focuses on high-tech innovation and business priorities, rather than hard-headed national security interests. Other countries, Williams said, have carved out a space for national security interests in industrial policy by not allowing other countries to build certain pieces of equipment. The Japanese, for example, have retained the capability to assemble their own warplanes. A shift in thinking The COVID-19 crisis, which has uncovered a potentially deadly shortage of ventilators and protective equipment for medical professionals, will push the federal government into a radical re-evaluation of what we need to be able to build at home to protect the country. In some respects, that work has already started. Earlier this week, reflecting on the Trump administration's moves to restrict exports of protective equipment, Ontario Premier Doug Ford expressed dismay over how the fate of so many Canadians had been taken out of the hands of the federal and provincial governments. Doctors, nurses demand government fill 'unacceptable' gaps in protective gear on front lines Canada working to produce up to 30,000 ventilators domestically: Trudeau "I am just so, so disappointed right now," he said. "We have a great relationship with the U.S. and all of a sudden they pull these shenanigans. But as I said yesterday, we will never rely on any other country going forward." Over the past two weeks, the federal government has announced plans to pour more than $2 billion into sourcing and acquiring protective medical equipment — masks, gowns, face shields, hand sanitizer — at home. On Tuesday, Ottawa unveiled a plan to get three Canadian companies to build 30,000 ventilators. Health equipment may have been outside the normal definition of national security needs until just a few weeks ago — but the shifting geopolitical landscape offered another warning sign that was ignored, said procurement expert Dave Perry. Leaning on China "This is pointing out the flip side of our globalized world and globalized supply chains," said Perry, an analyst and vice president at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. "The cold, hard truth is that we're going to be relying on China for critical supplies." When the coronavirus outbreak ramped up, federal officials should have been aware of the potential peril involved in relying on Chinese factories for so many critical items. But in the absence of homegrown capability, Canada is at the mercy of panicked nations in the midst of panicked buying. "The entire world is trying to put through orders from the same sets of factories we're trying to source from," Perry said. "It might be accurate to criticize the Chinese for their response, but in the current context the government has to be cognizant of the impact on our potential ability to source stuff we really, really need right now from China — when there's not a lot of other options available in the short term and when the rest of the world is making the same phone calls." One of the critical arguments against a homegrown national security industrial strategy has been the cost. It's an argument familiar from the shipbuilding context: taxpayers pay a premium when we task Canadian industry with delivering solutions, instead of turning to cheaper foreign manufacturers. Elinor Sloan, a defence policy expert at Carleton University, said she believes the crisis will focus the public's attention on securing the critical industries and supplies the country needs in a global crisis. "The trade-off, as we know, is that it can be more costly to build or produce at home," she said. "This crisis may engender a perspective among the public that the extra cost is worth it." https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/pandemic-covid-coronavirus-procurement-masks-ventilators-1.5525373

  • Trudeau says Canada wants out of $13 billion deal to sell armored vehicles to Saudi Arabia

    17 décembre 2018 | Local, Terrestre

    Trudeau says Canada wants out of $13 billion deal to sell armored vehicles to Saudi Arabia

    Bloomberg News, Natalie Obiko Pearson Canada was looking for a way out of a US$13 billion deal to export armored vehicles to Saudi Arabia, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in a televised interview Sunday. “We are engaged with the export permits to try and see if there is a way of no longer exporting these vehicles to Saudi Arabia,” Trudeau told CTV on Sunday, without elaborating. Amid growing international outrage over the murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the government has been reviewing the planned sale of the armored vehicles made by London, Ontario-based General Dynamics Land Systems, a unit of U.S.-based General Dynamics Corp. Trudeau's administration has said it wouldn't issue new export permits during its review of the deal, which was signed by the previous government. The Canadian leader had indicated previously that his government's hands were somewhat tied by the contract, saying it could cost $1 billion to cancel it. “The murder of a journalist is absolutely unacceptable and that's why Canada from the very beginning had been demanding answers and solutions on that,” Trudeau told CTV. https://business.financialpost.com/news/economy/trudeau-says-canada-wants-out-of-saudi-vehicle-export-deal

  • CAE appoints Todd Probert as group president, Defence and Security

    21 janvier 2020 | Local, Aérospatial, C4ISR

    CAE appoints Todd Probert as group president, Defence and Security

    CAE has announced the appointment of Todd Probert as group president, Defence and Security, effective Jan. 27, 2020. He will be based in Washington, D.C., and is succeeding Gene Colabatistto, who retired from CAE in December 2019. “I am very pleased to welcome Todd Probert to CAE's executive management team, as our new group president, Defence and Security. He is a proven strategic business leader with the right balance of technical, business and international experience in defence and technology,” said Marc Parent, CAE's president and chief executive officer. “Todd's competencies and background are very well aligned with CAE's emphasis on digital innovation and our long-term vision to be the training partner of choice. His ability to drive business growth and create strategic partnerships will bring significant value to our company and our defence customers.” Probert worked for Raytheon, the world's fourth largest defence company, over the past 10 years. Most recently, he was leading the Command, Control, Space and Intelligence business unit as part of Raytheon's Intelligence, Information and Services segment. In this role, he spearheaded Raytheon's use of commercial software development practices and artificial intelligence for military and intelligence community customers in addition to establishing strategic relationships with Silicon Valley companies. He previously served as the vice-president of Raytheon's Mission Support and Modernization product line where he steadily grew the business during his tenure. He has formed innovative partnerships with leading tech companies to transform the development timelines and delivery of capabilities to the U.S. Department of Defense in areas such as fully open architectures, artificial intelligence and cyber security. He also held the position of vice-president, Engineering and Technology, where he managed the engineering workforce for Raytheon's Intelligence, Information and Services portfolio. Before joining Raytheon, Probert worked for Honeywell Technology Solutions, Inc. (HTSI) in various functions such as strategy and business development, planning and operations, merger and acquisition activities, and he also served as HTSI's chief technology officer. Prior to that, he worked for ANSER, where he led the Space Technology division. In 2019, Probert was named by WashingtonExec as one of the Top 10 Department of Defense (DOD) Executives to Watch based on business accomplishments, impact on the defence community and vision for the future. He also received the 2019 Aviation Week Program Excellence Award in the OEM Sustainment category. Probert holds a master's degree in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from Purdue University, where he was named Outstanding Aerospace Engineer of the Year in 2017. He has a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Michigan. https://www.skiesmag.com/press-releases/cae-appoints-todd-probert-as-group-president-defence-and-security

Toutes les nouvelles