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July 26, 2021 | International, Land

US Army chooses competitors to design infantry fighting vehicle replacement

The U.S. Army has chosen five teams to develop rough digital designs for its Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle.

https://www.defensenews.com/land/2021/07/23/us-army-chooses-competitors-to-design-infantry-fighting-vehicle-replacement/

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  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - November 19, 2020

    November 20, 2020 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - November 19, 2020

    WASHINGTON HEADQUARTERS SERVICES American Systems Corp., Chantilly, Virginia (HQ0034-21-D-0003); Applied Research Associates Inc., Alexandria, Virginia (HQ0034-21-D-0004); and Modern Technology Solutions Inc., Alexandria, Virginia (HQ0034-21-D-0002), have been awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinitely-quantify contract with a maximum amount of $496,000,000.  This requirement will provide the range of research, development, test and evaluation technical and engineering services required to assist the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering in accomplishing its mission to create innovative warfighting technologies and advanced capabilities required to maintain U.S. technological superiority.  Work performance will take place in the Northern Capital Region, including Alexandria, Virginia; and Chantilly, Virginia.  No funds will be obligated at time of the award.  The expected completion date is Nov. 18, 2025.  Washington Headquarters Services, Arlington, Virginia, is the contracting activity. DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Vermilion Valley Produce Co.,* Danville, Illinois, has been awarded a maximum $265,500,000 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for fresh fruits and vegetables.  This was a competitive acquisition with one response received.  This is a four-year six-month contract with no option periods.  Location of performance is Illinois, with a May 18, 2025, ordering period end date.  Using customers are Army, Air Force, and Department of Agriculture schools.  Type of appropriation is fiscal 2021 through 2025 defense working capital funds.  The contracting agency is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE300-21-D-P359). Hill-Rom Co. Inc., Batesville, Indiana, has been awarded a maximum $48,000,000 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for medical equipment and accessories for the Defense Logistics Agency electronic catalog.  This was a competitive acquisition with 135 responses received.  This is a five-year contract with no option periods.  Location of performance is Indiana, with a Nov. 16, 2025, ordering period end date.  Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps.  Type of appropriation is fiscal 2021 through 2026 defense working capital funds.  The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE2DH-21-D-0052). AIR FORCE Journey Construction Inc., Taylor, Texas (FA4661-21-D-0001); Pace-Amtex JV LLC, Boerne, Texas (FA4661-21-D-0002); GMA Construction Group, Chicago, Illinois (FA4661-21-D-0003); Pro-Mark Services Inc., Rapid City, South Dakota (FA4661-21-D-0004); and Sea Pac Engineering Inc., Los Angeles, California (FA4661-21-D-0005), have collectively been awarded a ceiling $150,000,000 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, multiple award construction contract for $150,000,000.  Work will be performed at Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, and is expected to be completed Nov. 18, 2027.  Current fiscal operation and maintenance funds will be used per individual task order.  The 7th Contracting Squadron, Dyess AFB, Texas, is the contracting activity. Siemens Industry Inc., Buffalo Grove, Illinois, has been awarded a $54,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, firm-fixed-price, supply/install contract for the switchgear replacement effort program.  This contract will provide for a streamlined means to provide supply and installation of gas insulated switchgear.  Work will be performed at Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee; Mountain View, California; Eglin AFB, Florida; Holloman AFB, New Mexico; Kirtland AFB, New Mexico; and Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, and is expected to be completed Nov. 16, 2025.  This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition.  Fiscal 2020 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $8,365,562 are being obligated at the time of award.  Air Force Test Center, Arnold AFB, Tennessee, is the contracting activity (FA9101-21-D-0003). L-3 Technologies, Greenville, Texas, has been awarded an $18,796,399 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract modification (P00009) to contract FA8620-18-F-4801 for an additional engineering effort.  This modification provides for additional non-recurring and recurring engineering required to develop and install structural reinforcements to the aircraft.  Work will be performed in Greenville, Texas, and is expected to be completed Dec. 24, 2022.  This contract involves 100% Foreign Military Sales (FMS) and is the result of a sole-source acquisition.  The total cumulative face value of the contract is $273,945,200.  FMS funds in the full amount are being obligated at the time of the award.  The 645th Aeronautical Systems Group, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity. Siemens Healthineers, Flanders, New Jersey, has been awarded a $12,381,645 firm-fixed-price contract for an industrial base expansion.  The contract provides building modifications, equipment purchases, installation and qualification testing to expand U.S. domestic production capacity for SARS-CoV-2 antigen assays.  Work will be performed in Walpole, Massachusetts, and is expected to be completed Aug. 31, 2021.  This contract award is part of the ongoing collaboration between the Department of Defense and the Department of Health and Human Services and is funded through the Health Care Enhancement Act.  The Air Force Lifecycle Management Center, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, is the contracting activity (FA8730-21-C-0006). BAE Systems Technology Solutions & Services Inc., Rockville, Maryland, has been awarded a $12,342,000 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for Diminishing Manufacturing Sources and Material Shortages support.  This contract provides support for Air Force (AF) and non-AF users, supporting the AF, to proactively reduce mission capability impacts to improve logistics support and weapon system sustainability.  Work will be performed at Hill Air Force Base, Utah; Robins AFB, Georgia; Tinker AFB, Oklahoma; and Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, with some work performed at Fort Walton Beach, Florida.  The work is expected to be complete by June 20, 2025.  This award is the result of a competitive acquisition resulting in receipt of one offer.  Fiscal 2021 Consolidated Sustainment Activity Group engineering funds in the amount of $10,285,000 are being obligated in the first task order at the time of award.  The Air Force Sustainment Center, Tinker AFB, Oklahoma, is the contracting activity (FA8109-21-D-0001). Hardwood Products Co. LP, Guilford, Maine, has been awarded a not-to-exceed $11,640,270 firm-fixed-price, undefinitized contract action as a modification (P00003) to contract FA8730-20-C-0056 for industrial base expansion for U.S. domestic production capacity for medical flock tip swabs.  This contract modification funds the design, procurement and expedited implementation of facility upgrades, enabling an early, interim production capability of flock tip swabs.  Work will be performed in Pittsfield, Maine, and is expected to be completed March 30, 2021.  Fiscal 2021 other procurement funds in the amount of $5,078,350 are being obligated at the time of award.  The cumulative face value of the contract is $62,599,861.  The Air Force Life Cycle Management, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, is the contracting activity. FCN Inc., Rockville, Maryland, has been awarded a $7,846,260 firm-fixed-price modification to exercise the first option period for the Endgame Endpoint Security program software subscription to maintain the weapon system components and weapon system baseline to meet Air Force Space Command authority to operate configurations.  Work will be performed in Rockville, Maryland, and is expected to be completed Nov. 29, 2024.  This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and four offers were received.  Fiscal 2021 operation and maintenance; and Air National Guard procurement funds in the full amount are being obligated at the time of modification to exercise the first option period.  The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Joint-Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, is the contracting activity (FA8307-20-F-0005). NAVY IAP-ECC LLC, Burlingame, California, is awarded firm-fixed-price task order N62742-21-F-4000 for $84,547,765 under a multiple award contingency contract for construction and maintenance of a contractor berthing camp at Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS), China Lake, California.  The work to be performed provides for incidental temporary facilities and facility services for a berthing camp in support of the China Lake Earthquake Recovery project at NAWS, China Lake.  Incidental temporary facilities include fencing, living/sleeping units, operational center and a security station.  Facility services include management and administration, unaccompanied housing, facility investment, custodial, pest control, integrated solid waste management, grounds maintenance and landscaping, pavement clearance, wastewater and water.  The need for the berthing camp to support 11 military construction (MILCON) project contractors is an emergency response to the earthquakes that affected the China Lake area in July 2019.  The task order also contains four unexercised options, which if exercised, would increase the cumulative task order value to $138,743,035.  Work will be performed in Ridgecrest, California, and is expected to be completed by March 2025.  Fiscal 2020 MILCON (Navy) funds; and fiscal 2021 working capital (Navy) funds in the amount of $84,547,765 are obligated on this award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  One proposal was received for this task order.  The Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command, Pacific, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is the contracting activity (N62742-16-D-3553). Cherokee Nation Management and Consulting LLC, * Catoosa, Oklahoma, is awarded an $80,943,352 firm-fixed-price, time-and-materials contract for a two-month phase-in period and a 10-month base period with two 12-month option periods for logistics services to manage, support and operate the Marine Corps Consolidated Storage Program warehouse network.  Work will be performed in Barstow, California (23%); Camp Lejeune, North Carolina (18%); Camp Pendleton, California (13%); Okinawa, Japan (10%); Miramar, California (9%); Camp Geiger, North Carolina (7%); Twenty-nine Palms, California (4%); Cherry Point, North Carolina (4%); Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii (3%); Yuma, Arizona (2%); Beaufort, South Carolina (2%); Iwakuni, Japan (2%); New River, North Carolina (2%); and Bridgeport, California (1%).  Work is expected to be completed January 2024.  No funding will be obligated at time of award and the award will be made contingent to the availability of funds.  This contract was competitively solicited via beta.sam.gov with seven proposals received.  The Marine Corps Logistics Command, Albany, Georgia, is the contracting activity (M67004-21-C-0001). Marine Group Boat Works LLC,* Chula Vista, California, is awarded a $48,717,886 firm-fixed-price modification to previously awarded contract N00024-18-C-2223 in support of the government of Jordan for two 37-meter patrol boats, communications equipment and other technical assistance.  Work will be performed in Chula Vista, California, and is expected to be completed by September 2023.  Foreign Military Sales (Jordan) in the amount of $48,717,886 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  In accordance with 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c) (4), this contract was not competitively procured:  International Agreement.  This contract is for two 37-meter Patrol Boats, communications equipment and other technical assistance for the Royal Jordanian Navy.  The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, D.C., is the contracting activity. Kings Bay Support Services LLC, Alexandria, Virginia, is awarded a $24,085,883 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity modification for a bridge contract to extend services for base operating support services at Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, Georgia.  The work to be performed provides for all labor, facilities management, supervision, tools, materials, equipment, incidental engineering, environmental services and transportation to effectively execute base operations support services.  All work will be performed in St. Mary’s, Georgia.  After award of this option, the total cumulative contract value will be $392,424,567.  This option period is from December 2020 to May 2021.  No funds will be obligated at time of award.  Fiscal 2021 operation and maintenance (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $16,213,566 for recurring work will be obligated on individual task orders issued during the option period.  The Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command, Southeast, Jacksonville, Florida, is the contracting activity (N69450-11-D-7578). Insitu Inc., Bingen, Washington, is awarded a $9,769,387 modification (P00009) to firm-fixed-price order N68335-19-F-0434 against previously issued basic ordering agreement N68335-16-G-0046.  This modification definitizes pricing and exercises options for the procurement of 15 ScanEagle unmanned aerial vehicles, nine ScanEagle payloads, and three spares lots needed to provide the Afghanistan National Army (ANA) intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities, and support current ANA ScanEagle efforts.  Work will be performed in Bingen, Washington (100%), and is expected to be completed in July 2021.  Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $9,769,387 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  The Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, New Jersey, is the contracting activity. I.E. Pacific Inc.,* Escondido, California, is awarded firm-fixed-price task order N62473-20-F-5102 for $8,123,000 under a multiple award construction contract for repair of a bachelors enlisted quarters (BEQ) and repair of water channel at Marine Corps Base, Camp Pendleton, Virginia.  The work to be performed provides for the repair of BEQ Building 53451 with 64 units and the existing open channel/swale and culvert system through this corridor.  BEQ Building 53451 requires work to bring it up to current building code and life safety standards.  The channel is undersized and needs to be upgraded to provide higher flow rates without spilling over the channel.  The renovation project includes replacement of the existing built-up roof with a standing seam metal roof and the replacement of exterior hollow metal doors, windows, window screens, shades, hollow metal doors/frames and door locks with an electronic card reading lock system; the patching, repairing, and repainting of all existing interior walls and ceilings, exterior walls/façade, balcony, stair panels, handrails and guardrails, and other surfaces; and the installation of new ceiling fans in each billeting room, the duty room and the lounge.  Work will be performed in Oceanside, California, and is expected to be completed by May 2022.  Fiscal 2021 operation and maintenance (Marine Corps) contract funds in the amount of $8,123,000 are obligated on this award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  Four proposals were received for this task order.  The Naval Facilities Engineering Systems Command, Southwest, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity (N62473-17-D-4628). ARMY Franconia Real Estate Services Inc., doing business as Franconia Allegiance Government Relocation, Woodbridge, Virginia, was awarded a $65,000,000 blanket purchase agreement (W912DR-21-A-0001) for the Defense National Relocation Program.  Bids were solicited via the internet with 11 received.  Work will be performed in Baltimore, Maryland, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 30, 2025.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Reliance Relocation Services Inc., doing business as Relo Direct, Chicago, Illinois, was awarded a $65,000,000 blanket purchase agreement (W912DR-21-A-0002) for the Defense National Relocation Program.  Bids were solicited via the internet with 11 received.  Work will be performed in Baltimore, Maryland, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 30, 2025.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Attain LLC, McLean, Virginia, was awarded a $19,125,495 modification (BA0733) to contract W91QUZ-11-D-0016 for contractor resources to support the Army Shared Services Center.  Bids were solicited via the internet with one received.  Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of April 30, 2022.  The U.S. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, is the contracting activity. *Small business https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Contracts/Contract/Article/2421845/source/GovDelivery/

  • Japan Could Pick And Choose Components From Tempest

    December 2, 2019 | International, Aerospace

    Japan Could Pick And Choose Components From Tempest

    Bradley Perrett Japan says it wants international collaboration in developing its Future Fighter for the 2030s, but it wants to lead the project despite limited experience in fighter development. And it aims at a fighter much larger than any operated by a western European country ; the U.S. is not offering a possible joint project. That seems to leave only the choice of indigenous development, perhaps with help from a foreign technical partner.  Nevertheless, participation in the UK’s Tempest program may also be feasible. The Tempest project—which includes the Royal Air Force, BAE Systems, Rolls-Royce and MBDA—has a cooperation concept that leaves scope for Japan and other partners to use their own systems, weapons, propulsion and even airframes, says Air Commodore Daniel Storr, head of combat aircraft acquisition at the UK Defense Ministry.  The model described by Storr gives Japan the flexibility to choose the size of its own fighter. Though evidently not an objective, this mix-and-match approach also creates an opportunity for Japan to continue to claim development leadership—but also to save money by sharing systems. The policy goal of running its own fighter program, stated in 2018, has looked like a big obstacle to Japan’s participation in the Tempest or the Future Combat Air System (FCAS) project initiated by France and Germany. But if the Future Fighter shared only some features with Tempest, Japan could reasonably say it was leading its own program. BAE Systems promoted the Tempest program at the DSEI Japan exhibition held in Tokyo fromNov. 18-20. Prospective FCAS prime contractors, such as Airbus, did not show their concept. Storr outlined the flexible model of cooperative development at an exhibition conference, but Japanese speakers at that event did not comment on the prospect of Japan joining Tempest. In a Nov. 1 interview with The Financial Times, newly appointed Defense Minister Taro Kono seemed to play down the possibility of participation in a European program, saying Japan should explore all possibilities but needed to maintain interoperability with U.S. forces. Storr addressed that point, emphasizing that working with the U.S. was a high priority for the UK too. Japan’s alternative to international cooperation is developing a fighter by itself with the technical help of a foreign company. Lockheed Martin is supporting the Korea Aerospace Industries KF-X and BAE is helping the Turkish Aerospace Industries TF-X in such an arrangement. By working with Lockheed Martin, Boeing or Northrop Grumman, Tokyo would partially compensate the U.S. for its expenditures in defending Japan. But the U.S. would gain little from technical support fees, and Japan is already committed to buying 147 Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightnings as the aircraft to precede the Future Fighters. The defense ministry has asked for the development of the Future Fighter to be launched in the fiscal year beginning April 2020. It is not clear whether that means mobilizing resources to commence full-scale development or taking some lesser step to firm up the commitment to create the aircraft.  For the past year, the government’s policy has been to launch no later than March 2024. However, Japanese companies, especially fighter builder Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI), are pushing for a launch as soon as possible. They want to transfer knowledge to young engineers from the older generation that developed Japan’s last fighter, the MHI F-2, which the Future Fighter will replace. The UK does not want to commit to launching full-scale development of the Tempest before 2025, but its date for entry into service in 2035 meets Japan’s objective, which is sometime in the 2030s. Meanwhile, the FCAS program is aiming at 2040. Sweden and Italy are cooperating with the UK during the current early stage of Tempest research, while Spain has joined France and Germany for FCAS work. Like Storr, BAE has stressed the advantages of partners taking only as much of the Tempest as they want. “There is a range of different partnership models that can be considered,” says Andy Latham, who is working on the program.  “Japan has some great technology that any partner can benefit from. Their avionics industry is pretty effective.” The cooperation concept replaces the standard model, one in which partners spend years negotiating and compromising to define a design that all of them must accept. Instead, according to Storr, they can save time and money by agreeing to disagree—to the extent that each is willing to pay the extra cost of independent development and manufacturing of design elements. The Japanese defense ministry’s studies point to a need for a very big fighter with an empty weight well above 20 metric tons (40,000 lb.), larger than the Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor. Superior endurance and internal weapon capacity are the key factors behind this choice. No western European country has operated a fighter more than about two-thirds as big, but Storr said a large configuration for the Tempest cannot be ruled out. The mockup exhibited at the 2018 Farnborough International Airshow was bigger than the F-22. Still, the UK and other European partners might want a much smaller fighter; concept designs that have not been shown are not as big as the mockup. But the concept for cooperation would allow for Japan to devise its own airframe while, for example, using the same engine and some weapons, software and avionics as other partners. The architecture of the software is intended to be open, accepting different programs easily. Tempest researchers will consider which systems and capabilities will go into the fighter and which will be incorporated into the ammunition or an accompanying drone, which could be fully reusable or optionally expendable, Storr says. The FCAS program is taking a similar approach. The Tempest will need great capacity for generating electricity, he says, and the weapon bay should be regarded as a payload bay, perhaps for holding additional fuel that would extend endurance on surveillance missions. The Japanese finance ministry is insisting upon private investment in the Future Fighter program, in part to ensure contractors are fully incentivized to prevent failure. Contractors will be able to make money in civil programs from technology developed for the fighter, says the ministry, which is highly influential but does not have a final say. “Judging from past program examples, it is clear that the Future Fighter program would bring a risk of a budget overrun and schedule slippage, but would also benefit the private sector,” the finance ministry said in an October presentation to the Council on Fiscal Policy, an advisory body. “The government and private sector should invest funds and resources to build a failure-proof framework.” Noting that MHI used technology from the F-2 program in its development and manufacturing of the outer wing boxes of the Boeing 787, the ministry says contractors can expect to gain similar opportunities for civil applications of technology from the Future Fighter program—so they should invest in it. https://aviationweek.com/defense/japan-could-pick-and-choose-components-tempest

  • Achat de Rafale par la Grèce, crise du secteur aérien : entretien avec Eric Trappier, président du GIFAS et PDG de Dassault Aviation

    September 16, 2020 | International, Aerospace

    Achat de Rafale par la Grèce, crise du secteur aérien : entretien avec Eric Trappier, président du GIFAS et PDG de Dassault Aviation

    Eric Trappier, président du GIFAS et PDG de Dassault Aviation, s’exprimait ce matin sur RTL. Le dirigeant a notamment évoqué la commande de 18 Rafale par la Grèce, annoncée samedi 12 septembre. Les Rafale commandés par la Grèce seront livrés «dans l’année à venir, soit en 2021», indique M. Trappier. La commande comprendra 12 avions d’ «occasion», actuellement opérationnels au sein de l’armée de l’Air française, une mesure décidée afin de répondre à l’urgence du besoin exprimé par la Grèce. Ces prélèvements d’appareils au sein de l’armée de l’Air française seront « compensés par la fabrication d’avions neufs », insiste M. Trappier. La fabrication de 18 Rafale garantit « un an de travail pour les chaînes de production de Dassault Aviation et de ses sous-traitants », souligne-t-il. M. Trappier rappelle également qu’une discussion avec le gouvernement français est en cours concernant l’achat d’une «cinquième tranche de 30 avions». Le Rafale est «un avion qui n’arrête pas d’évoluer, par standards successifs», souligne le dirigeant : «on est en train de développer le quatrième standard». Interrogé sur la crise que traverse actuellement le secteur de l’aéronautique, M. Trappier souligne que l’Etat est «très mobilisé» ; mais il met en garde contre le «changement d’hypothèse» qui surviendrait si «les frontières restent fermées et si le trafic aérien ne reprend pas». Il rappelle que le secteur de l’aéronautique travaille, depuis plusieurs années, à la mise au point d’un «avion décarboné», dont le développement s’est récemment accéléré avec le soutien du gouvernement. RTL Matin du 16 septembre

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