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June 9, 2021 | Local, Aerospace

Access to the presentation - Future Fighter Lead-In Training (FFLIT) RFI (W6369-210262/A)

Here is the link which gives access to the presentation made on June 1st for the FLIT project : 

https://buyandsell.gc.ca/procurement-data/tender-notice/PW-FF-002-28209

On the same subject

  • Sole-sourced contracts can be 'raw deal', top officials said in navy ship case

    December 7, 2018 | Local, Naval

    Sole-sourced contracts can be 'raw deal', top officials said in navy ship case

    Lee Berthiaume / The Canadian Press OTTAWA — New court documents show public servants discussing the risk to taxpayers as successive federal governments have turned to sole-source contracts to buy desperately needed equipment for the Canadian Forces and others. The documents were filed on behalf of suspended Vice-Admiral Mark Norman, who is charged with breach of trust in connection with one such contract. They land amid frustrations with Canada's military procurement system — including because of political mismanagement — that have led to the need for quick fixes. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government has chosen to sign several sole-source contracts to bolster the coast guard's aging icebreaking fleet and the country's fighter-jet force, buying time to find permanent replacements. Sole-sourcing does make sense in many cases, said defence analyst David Perry of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, particularly where there is an emergency or it's clear that only one company can meet the government's needs. "But if you're sole-sourcing to fill a capability gap, that's the result of mismanaging a procurement to the point where you are out of options and have no alternative," Perry said. "That's not really a good reason to be sole-sourcing." The Tories under Stephen Harper once intended to buy a fleet of F-35 fighter jets on an untendered contract, but aborted that plan in 2012 once the full price became known. Then the Trudeau government planned to spend about $6 billion on 18 sole-sourced "interim" Super Hornets from Boeing because it said Canada needed more fighter jets to support its aging CF-18s until replacements could be purchased through a competition. The Super Hornets deal eventually fell apart because of a trade dispute with Boeing. So the government is buying 25 second-hand Australian fighter jets, also without a competition. Canada isn't expected to get new fighter jets until at least 2025. The Liberals also recently bought three second-hand icebreakers from Quebec-based Davie Shipbuilding for the coast guard, whose existing fleet is on average 35 years old — with no immediate plan to replace it on the horizon. Suspended as the military's second-in-command in January 2017, Norman was charged in March 2018 with one count of breach of trust for allegedly leaking cabinet secrets to Davie over a different contract. He has denied any wrongdoing and vowed to fight the charge. The case against Norman centres on a sole-sourced deal negotiated between Davie and the previous Conservative government in 2015, in which the Quebec shipyard proposed converting a civilian cargo ship into a temporary support vessel for the navy. The $700-million contract with Davie was not finalized before that year's federal election. Although the newly elected Liberals at first wanted to delay it for a closer review, they signed off on the deal a short time later. Before Liberal ministers agreed to buy the converted ship, bureaucrats from the Privy Council Office, the government's top department, wrote a secret briefing note in November 2015 that discussed the problems with not holding a competition. "The risk inherent with a sole-source contract is that much of the leverage in the contract negotiation resides with the company," the bureaucrats wrote, even as they noted that the Conservatives had exempted the deal from the usual oversight for such projects. Despite these concerns, the officials recommended the government approve the deal. Partly because they had assessed that "risk mitigation measures" were in place, but mostly because the navy urgently needed a support ship for faraway operations. The court documents, none of which have been filed as exhibits or tested in court, include RCMP interviews with civil servants that suggest politicians' desire for votes in Quebec also played a role in the decisions about the ship. But the navy's need for the vessel was real. The navy at the time had just retired its 50-year-old support ships and while replacements are being built in Vancouver through the government's national shipbuilding plan, numerous delays and problems mean they won't be ready until the 2020s. The navy had originally expected to get new support ships in 2012. The briefing note said a competition could have been held to find another, perhaps cheaper, solution, but "a competitive process would take longer to deliver a solution — likely 10-14 months for a contract award, and then more time for the service to be ready." RCMP interviews with several senior civil servants raise similar concerns about awarding a contract to Davie without a competition while also alluding to the sense of urgency in getting new support ships. The Defence Department's head of procurement, Patrick Finn, told the Mounties that other companies were clamouring to compete to supply a temporary support ship in late 2014, and that "the information existed to say that this could be done competitively." But Finn noted that Davie had already found a ship that it could convert for the navy, which "at that point had no replenishment ships." Melissa Burke, an analyst with the Privy Council Office who attended various cabinet meetings about Davie's proposal in 2015, told the RCMP that federal procurement officials were unhappy because "they felt the taxpayers were getting a raw deal." https://www.timescolonist.com/sole-sourced-contracts-can-be-raw-deal-top-officials-said-in-navy-ship-case-1.23516431

  • New Cyber Security Strategy bolsters cyber safety, innovation and prosperity

    June 13, 2018 | Local, C4ISR

    New Cyber Security Strategy bolsters cyber safety, innovation and prosperity

    The Government of Canada is committed to defending Canada and Canadians against cyber threats. Today, the Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, the Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National Defence, and the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science & Economic Development delivered the National Cyber Security Strategy. This new strategy will guide the Government of Canada’s cyber security activities to safeguard Canadians’ digital privacy, security and economy. The strategy strengthens both how we combat cybercrimes and how we defend against them. It consolidates federal cyber operations into the new Canadian Centre for Cyber Security, which will create one clear and trusted national authority. Instead of several different departments, the Centre will provide a single window for expert advice and services for governments, critical infrastructure operators, and both the public and private sector to strengthen their cyber security. The Centre’s first head will be Scott Jones, who is currently responsible for the IT Security Branch at the Communications Security Establishment. A new National Cybercrime Coordination Unit in the RCMP will support and coordinate cybercrime investigations between police forces across the country. New investments will bolster the RCMP’s capacity to investigate major cybercrimes that affect the Government of Canada, impact critical infrastructure, and cause the most harm to Canadians. These investments will also enhance the RCMP’s ability to conduct criminal investigations with domestic and international partners and provide specialized cyber capability to major investigations. In addition, small and medium-sized businesses will be able to enhance their cyber security with guidance and tools through the Centre, as well as a new voluntary cyber certification program, which will outline best practices to help businesses understand and respond to cyber threats. For Canadians, the strategy and associated investments mean a clear and trusted federal source for cyber security information, practical tips to apply to everyday online activities and heightened awareness of malicious cyber activity. For businesses, the National Cyber Security Strategy puts into place a framework that will improve their systems’ resilience. For researchers and academics, it will support advanced research, fostering innovation, skills and knowledge. And for the digital systems we rely on every day, like online banking, electricity grids and telecommunications, it will support stronger security, and more rapid and coordinated federal responses to cyber threats. Quotes “Cyber security is not only a challenge, but an opportunity. Virtually every aspect of our modern lives depends on information technology. If Canadians are empowered to improve their cyber security and adapt to new threats—across government, the private sector and our personal use—we will not only realize the potential of the digital economy and keep our own data secure, but we can sell those skills and innovations to the huge, growing market in the rest of the world, creating high-paying middle class jobs. The National Cyber Security Strategy is the Government of Canada’s roadmap to get there.” - The Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness “The threats we face in cyberspace are complex and rapidly evolving; more than ever, cyber security is of paramount importance. Cyber security is not just a necessity, but a competitive advantage for Canada. The National Cyber Security Strategy establishes a clear focal point for cyber security within the federal government. The Communications Security Establishment is well-positioned to create and house the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security by building on the tremendous skill and talent that already exist within the government and partnering with industry to strengthen cyber security in Canada.” - The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National Defence “The Government of Canada is committed to safeguarding Canadians’ digital privacy, security and the economy. For Canada’s small and medium-sized businesses, cyber threats can have profound economic consequences. That is why we are investing over $25 million over five years for a voluntary assessment and certification program to help small and medium-sized businesses protect themselves against cyber threats. This new certification program will improve cyber security among Canadian small and medium-sized businesses, increase consumer confidence, and better position small and medium-sized businesses to compete globally.”  - The Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science & Economic Development “I am honoured to be named the first head of the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security. The Cyber Centre will bring together the government’s leading-edge cyber security operational talent from the Communications Security Establishment, Public Safety, and Shared Services Canada to be a unified and trusted source for cyber security information for the country. The Cyber Centre will be outward-facing, open to collaboration with industry partners and academia, as well as a trusted resource for faster, stronger responses to cyber security incidents. Cyber security is, and continues to be a team effort.” - Scott Jones, Head of Canadian Centre for Cyber Security and Deputy Chief, IT Security, CSE  Quick facts Canadians spend the most time on-line of any country in the world – at 43.5 hours each per month. Cybercrime costs Canada 0.17% of its GDP, which is equal to $3.12 billion a year. Cyber-crime globally is estimated to cause $600-billion (US) in economic losses in 2018 and more than $6 trillion (US) by 2021. The global market for cyber security products and services is currently worth more than $96 billion (US), and is expected to grow to over $202 billion (US) by 2021. Budget 2018 invested $507.7M over five years and $108.8M per year ongoing to support the new Strategy. It includes: $155.2M over five years and $44.5M per year ongoing, to create the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security; $116M over five years and $23.2M per year ongoing, to the RCMP for the creation of the National Cybercrime Coordination Unit; $85.3M over five years and $19.8M ongoing for increased RCMP enforcement capacity; and $28.4M over five years for cyber certification. The remaining funds are for additional initiatives to support greater cyber security and resilience for small and medium-sized businesses, as well as the energy and financial sectors. In addition, Budget 2018 invested a further $220 million over six years in Shared Services Canada and the Communications Security Establishment to better protect government networks and data; and $30 million over five years and $5 million ongoing in the Canada Revenue Agency to protect taxpayers’ personal information. The Strategy reflects the perspectives from the Cyber Review and consultation. https://www.canada.ca/en/public-safety-canada/news/2018/06/new-cyber-security-strategy-bolsters-cyber-safety-innovation-and-prosperity.html

  • AP&C opens new AM facility in Quebec to meet demand for its 3D printing materials

    September 14, 2017 | Local, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR

    AP&C opens new AM facility in Quebec to meet demand for its 3D printing materials

    The Quebecois company Advanced Powders and Coatings (AP&C), which is owned by 3D printing giant Arcam AB, has now officially opened this second factory in Saint-Eustache. It is expected to create over 100 new jobs, and at least half of these positions should be filled by the end of the year. http://www.3ders.org/articles/20170914-ap-and-c-opens-new-am-factory-in-quebec-to-meet-demand-for-its-3d-printing-materials.html

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