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  • Peraton expands Calgary operations to advance Canada defence program support

    25 septembre 2018 | Local, Aérospatial

    Peraton expands Calgary operations to advance Canada defence program support

    As a leading provider of high value logistics and support to Canadian defence for more than 35 years, Peraton recently completed its Calgary facility operations expansion and modernization. The new facility will enable broader support of Canada’s CF-188 fighter fleet and position the company for future growth on fighter platforms and programs. Peraton’s Calgary facility, at 76,000-plus square feet, now with an engineering lab for operational design and development, is a “one-stop-shop” for integrated logistics support. The site provides full life-cycle supply chain management for the largest allocation of government-owned materiel in Canada. “With our proven record of efficiency, having reduced costs for the CF-188 fleet, we are well equipped and ready to scale to support Canada’s future fighter program,” said Gus Bontzos, president, Defence and Electronic Warfare sector. “We are also proud partners in spurring enterprise development, with 60 per cent of our supplier base in Canada comprised primarily of small to medium sized businesses.” Peraton’s investment is helping to propel Calgary’s economic growth, sparking renewed growth in specialized high-tech jobs. With its development of a platform-agnostic, scalable sustainment model that can optimize program performance for any platform–air, land, or sea, the Peraton model represents the next generation of cooperative military advancement. https://www.skiesmag.com/press-releases/peraton-expands-calgary-operations-to-advance-canada-defence-program-support

  • Naval Academy’s cybersecurity program receives accreditation

    25 septembre 2018 | International, C4ISR

    Naval Academy’s cybersecurity program receives accreditation

    By: Brian Witte, The Associated Press ANNAPOLIS, Md. — The U.S. Naval Academy’s cyber operations program has been formally accredited. The academy said Friday the program was accredited recently by ABET, a leading nonprofit accrediting agency. Three other universities also were accredited under the new cybersecurity criteria: the U.S. Air Force Academy, Towson University and Southeast Missouri State University. A cyber operations major was established in 2013 at the academy. The academy also requires all midshipmen to take a cyber course in both their freshmen and junior years — the first undergraduate school to have mandatory cyber classes. There were 27 midshipmen who majored in cyber operations in the class of 2016. That has grown to 110 in the class of 2021. The academy is building a $106 million cybersecurity building. https://www.navytimes.com/news/your-navy/2018/09/24/naval-academys-cybersecurity-program-receives-accreditation

  • South Korean military to upgrade ‘friend or foe’ ID capability

    25 septembre 2018 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR

    South Korean military to upgrade ‘friend or foe’ ID capability

    By: Jeff Jeong SEOUL — Thousands of South Korean jet fighters, helicopters, warships and missile systems will be fitted with sophisticated identifications technologies by the mid-2020s under a major weapons upgrade program, according to the military and defense companies. For the $2.2 billion deal to switch the decades-old Mode-4 Identification Friend or Foe, or IFF, system to the latest Mode-5, South Korea’s arms procurement agency has started issuing a request for proposals. “The number of equipment eligible for the Mode-5 upgrade account approximately 2,000 related to 70 weapons systems,” according to a spokesman for the Defense Acquisition Program Administration. “The request for proposals will continued to be issued separately by the types of weapons systems over the coming weeks.” The upgrade program is in line with the transfer of IFF systems to the Mode-5 version by the U.S military, as the South Korean military conducts key operations with U.S. forces on the Korean Peninsula under the authority of the Combined Forces Command. By 2020, all NATO nations are required to introduce the Mode-5 systems, using advanced cryptographic techniques to secure their systems against electronic deception by adversaries. “This is a huge program as for the numbers and budget, and is strategically important to upgrading the battlefield capability of the South Korean military and its joint operations with allied forces,” said Kim Dae-young, a military analyst at the Korea Research Institute for National Strategy. “The new encrypted system will allow South Korean and its allied troops to work safely together, reducing the risk of friendly fire incidents, and it will also offer commanders a better view of the battlefield,” Kim added. IFF works by sending coded signals, with equipment on friendly planes and ships able to receive and instantly decode the encrypted challenge message, then send the appropriate response to identify themselves. Three South Korean defense manufacturers are competing for the IFF upgrade contract by teaming up with foreign IFF developers. They are Hanwha Systems, teaming up with U.S. company Raytheon and Hensoldt of Germany; LIG Nex1, with Italy’s Leonardo and Thales of France; and Korea Aerospace Industries, joining hands with BAE Systems of the United Kingdom. Unlike the installation of the Mode-4, the technologies of which belong to foreign IFF makers, domestic companies are involved in the Mode-5 systems development and will locally produce the equipment for cost-effectiveness and sustainable integrated logistics support, according to Defense Acquisition Program Administration officials. Hanwha Systems, a leading defense electronics company formerly known as Samsung Thales, claims it has the advantage of having know-how related to IFF integration and design. “Our company was in charge of almost all Mode-4 upgrade programs in cooperation with foreign partners,” said Yoon Seok-joon, a consultant with Hanwha Systems' avionics business team. “Through the experience, we have much better knowledge of IFF design and functions than other local competitors. This is a clear advantage.” LIG Nex1, a precision missile developer, formed a task force in 2016 for Mode-5 upgrade work to seek related technology for localization. As a result, the company successfully localized a Mode-5 system for its KP-SAM Shin-Gung (or Chiron) shoulder-launched surface-to-air missiles with the help of Thales, which is contracted to provide Mode-5 technologies for ground weapons systems. “Based on the successful development of a Mode-5 device for Shin-Gung, we’re now able to independently develop Mode-5 equipment for other weapons systems, such as Hybrid Biho air defense system; Chunma short-range surface-to-air missile; and TPS-830K low-altitude radar,” said Park Jung-ho, program manager of LIG Nex1’s Mode-5 upgrade team. To help facilitate the certification of its Mode-5 systems by the U.S. Defense Department, LIG Nex1 recently signed an agreement with the U.S. defense system certification contractor KBR. Korea Aerospace Industries is expected to win contracts for Mode-5 devices to be fitted on advanced aircraft, including F-15K fighters, T-50 trainer jets and Surion utility helicopters. KAI develops the Surion platform. “We own thousands of platforms around the world with this product, so we have lots of experiences in the U.S. and other countries as well as with this IFF piece of equipment,” said Rob Peer, president of BAE Systems in Korea. “It’s advanced technology with low weight, low power and cost effective. All of those things make it very effective.” Peer stressed that he feels BAE Systems’ Mode-5 is the best fit for the systems of the F-35 fighter jet, which South Korea is to deploy in the coming years. https://www.defensenews.com/global/asia-pacific/2018/09/24/south-korean-military-to-upgrade-friend-or-foe-id-capability

  • Saudi Arabian Military Industries (SAMI) looks to investment in South Africa

    25 septembre 2018 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR

    Saudi Arabian Military Industries (SAMI) looks to investment in South Africa

    Helmoed-Römer Heitman, Pretoria Saudi Arabia is considering investing in the defence industries of South Africa, the chief executive of Saudi Arabian Military Industries (SAMI) confirmed during the African Aerospace and Defence (AAD) exhibition. Dr Andreas Schwer's comments were made following an earlier vist by SAMI representatives to South Africa to discuss investment in national defence organisation Denel. SAMI's interest has centred on munitions, guided weapons, artillery systems, and optronics and the state-owned organisation has indicated that it would consider establishing a research and development centre in South Africa. SAMI's expression of interest coincided with comments from Denel acting chief executive Mike Kgobe who indicated that his company is actively seeking equity partners. https://www.janes.com/article/83303/sami-looks-to-investment-in-south-africa

  • Germany looking to sell costly, rarely used drone to Canada

    25 septembre 2018 | Local, Aérospatial

    Germany looking to sell costly, rarely used drone to Canada

    By: Frank Jordans, The Associated Press BERLIN — Germany is looking to sell a secondhand surveillance drone that has cost the country more than 700 million euros ($823 million) to Canada — without many core components it needs to fly. A defense ministry reply to lawmakers from the opposition Left Party states that Germany has decided to "begin concrete negotiations with Canada for the sale of the Euro Hawk aircraft, two ground stations and possibly certain spare parts." The government response, dated Sept. 19 and obtained by The Associated Press, adds that Germany isn't currently in talks with any other country or organization about the sale of the drone. In a statement Monday, Germany's defense ministry confirmed talks with Canada were planned, but declined to comment on a possible sales price or date. Officials at the Canadian Embassy in Berlin weren't immediately able to comment. Germany ordered the Northrop Grumman Global Hawk variant in 2000 to use for long-distance reconnaissance, but later canceled the order because of skyrocketing costs and revelations that the prototype wouldn't be certified to fly in Europe. Then-Defense Minister Thomas de Maiziere acknowledged in 2013 that the drone was a write-off, telling lawmakers it was better to have a "horrible end than a horror without end." Last year, the government acknowledged that the development and procurement of the prototype, a signals-intelligence sensor called "ISIS" and spare parts, and the completion of seven test flights had cost about 681 million euros since 2007. A further 24 million euros were spent on preparing for a resumption of temporary test flights. According to the government's latest response to Left Party lawmakers, which hasn't been published yet, the drone has already been "demilitarized." This entailed the removal of American-made radio equipment, the GPS receiver and aerials, as well as all encryption and the flight control system. Rather than laboriously delete individual software components, technicians chose to perform a "hardware uninstallation" — removing all hard drives containing sensitive U.S.-made software. "The question is what a buyer would do with such a gutted aircraft," said Thomas Wiegold, a German journalist who runs the defense website Augen Geradeaus . "Without GPS navigation and in particular without flight control systems, the drone would hardly be able to fly." Andrej Hunko, one of the Left Party lawmakers who submitted questions to the government, said the drone now only has "scrap value." "The sale will therefore recoup at best a small portion of the tax money spent," he said. "I expect the loss will amount to several hundred million euros (dollars)." Hunko, whose party objects to airborne military surveillance, said the drone’s ground stations might still fetch a market price. https://www.defensenews.com/global/europe/2018/09/24/germany-looking-to-sell-costly-rarely-used-drone-to-canada

  • SAIC boss tackles Engility acquisition, space market and revenue goals

    25 septembre 2018 | International, Terrestre

    SAIC boss tackles Engility acquisition, space market and revenue goals

    WASHINGTON — News that SAIC would buy Engility was just the latest in a recent string of acquisitions among the professional services firms. But if you ask the CEO of SAIC, Tony Moraco, unlike some of the company’s peers this was not transformational. This was instead a merging of two complementary businesses. In his words, “a momentum builder, as we are stronger together in the marketplace.” It’s also the next phase for a company that technically formed five years ago, with the split of the $11 billion legacy company with the same name. Defense News sat down with Moraco to see how the acquisition fits into SAIC’s future strategy, and how far the company has come since gaining independence. About a year after SAIC split from Leidos, I asked you about your vision for the company. And you said to return to an $11 billion company. How does this acquisition fit into your vision for SAIC these days? The Engility acquisition is very much consistent with our current strategy. It is not a deviation or a reset, as perhaps some of the other major transactions have been for some of our peers. But it really is about the theme of being stronger together, with [particular] compatibility of the intelligence community … and also attributes in space market segments that we think we can both serve better. For us, this is opening market access to channels that we didn’t have. It’s momentum building, a vision and a strategy that was five years in the making, and it’s a continuation of that strategy going forward. So have you been looking for an extended period of time? And why Engility specifically? We consistently look at the market. We were not going to be a high-volume buyer, but more selective. The Scitor [acquisition] was more than three years ago. But we felt that we had a good position in the marketplace to grow organically. And we proved very strong performance over five years and since [that last acquisition of] Scitor. And then we’ve looked at many deals, large and small, to see what makes the most sense to us, staying true to our strategy. The attraction with Engility was probably first sparked by the multi-intelligence agency portfolio that they have. Instead of buying a number of smaller concentrated firms, we could get a couple agencies in one larger deal. The company is large enough, they have a mature system. Again, in contrast to perhaps some of the small businesses, we think it has been through its own cultural shift to align very much to ours. Also of interest is the space market. Today, with denied access and with the threats that we have, space is becoming a much more serious domain. The U.S. wants to invest more in it for a range of reasons. And when we think about space, it does cross, in fact, with the intelligence community, the defense sector with Air Force and the other services, and then also the civilian agencies with NASA, [and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration]. As that market evolves, I think the U.S. government will be a principal customer. I believe that the commercial space entities will find a way where they’ll also require key outsourced space services just as the government had. So for a single transaction at scale where we could in fact use our equity, [and face] probably fewer buyers, filling three or four of our strategic initiatives in market access and in capabilities — we felt it was worth a serious look. But it’s not just about space and intel. Defense will still be the largest part of our portfolio — 55 percent after we close [from 61 percent]. With the benefit of having the broader diversification in intel and federal civilian agencies, that serves all of our customers from a technology transfer perspective. We’ve seen an interesting transition in the market, where the big primes are shedding portions of their services segments. Have we officially returned to the days when manufacturers focus on platforms only and leave the rest to the professional services companies? I think we [for a period of time] faced a market that was uncertain. Our customers were reprioritizing their mission areas, and the industry was doing the same — looking at where they were going to focus their precious dollars, identify businesses they were going to protect, and areas that maybe weren’t core. Then as the market started to improve and move away from cost reductions to protect margins to having some cash and some flexibility, you started seeing more portfolio shaping from the larger players. It’s not just about scale. There’s [a focus on] the diversification because as you know, the whole business is based on past performance and on what qualifications you have in people and in contract vehicles; if you have a broader base concentrated in a few key areas, your ability to compete and win in those domains is improved. There are a lot of technologies that are more heavily influencing the battlefield — whether ISR, electronic warfare, even still cyber, which is evolving. It seems those areas don’t fit quite as neatly in one model or the other. We’ve been around. It’s not a body shop service that we run. It is services and solutions. But technology integration is a direct link to the customer’s demand for modernization, the interest in innovative solutions from nontraditional players, the ability to field capabilities faster in a much shorter development cycle, and that leads you to a technology integration model that we have. It allows us to take mission understanding and translate requirements into capability needs. So we can integrate, we can innovate with the technology and we can implement the solutions, which is fundamentally what the customer needs to migrate them from a current state to a future state. But we’re seeing more and more opportunities through the [Defense Innovation Unit], the [other transaction authorities], and other contract vehicles that provide a little more rapid prototyping flexibility. SAIC bid for the Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle and is now working to compete for the Army’s Mobile Protected Firepower program.How does that all fit into the broader strategy? We do see it as a viable area, and I would characterize it as the next tier of complex technology integration, system integration. It’s an extension of our command-and-control and ISR integration. I recall we pushed through 30,000 MRAP systematic build packages. That kind of integration of subsystems into a platform is what we felt was a baseline business that we could look to expand; and as the customer looked at, in this case, starting with Assault Amphibious Vehicle. Not a start-from-scratch build — the survivability upgrade really was around the armor, the underbelly and then your armaments protecting the vehicle. And then the related mobility requirements to change out transmissions and engines to support that extra weight. We felt that those subsystems and our mission knowledge afforded us the ability to extend to a little more of the physical platform itself. We’re doing work on the next-gen combat vehicle. And we’re using a services model for MPF. Again, nondevelopmental, major integration of existing platforms for rapid field development. That fits well into our technology and integration model. We see the ground vehicles and perhaps maritime [areas] as one that was probably more approachable versus, say, airframes. Modernization of aircraft has its own barriers of entry of getting flight readiness and the like. We’ve extended our test-equipment knowledge to partnering with Lockheed on the propulsion system for torpedoes, for example. So we’re just looking for selective areas to do more complex system integration under this broad technology integration umbrella. It just happens to be bigger subsystems. Complex system integration sets us apart from some of the current peers in the marketplace right now. But we’re selective in what we go after. How hard of a hit was the loss of the Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle in moving forward with that? It’s disappointing. We try to be practical and objective about our market position. It’s an alternative model. It’s still early in the life cycle. But I think that as we see different opportunities, we learn from it as the customers get more comfortable. So yes, disappointing on ACV, but at the same time we learned a lot from it and I think the customer ultimately got a very good result by having a competitive phase. And we think that the Army [with MPF] will be as successful and come up with [the] best solution if they can maintain a competitiveness early in the process. When the split first happened, you and Leidos were generally two different companies. With this acquisition, and with the Leidos acquisition from Lockheed, have you all started to mirror each other more? I think we may be looking a little more alike. Five years ago I did not expect it. I think we had very clear strategies that [we] were intending to diverge, and therefore we did not have any formal noncompetes. We were looking at the services business model, and Leidos was looking to do more system development. I think their execution of that didn’t play out as fast as they’d like. Roger [Krone, Leidos CEO], buying back in the services, more of the information system side, was a bit of a surprise. So if anything, they came back towards us versus us changing direction. So I’d say they probably navigated slightly different than expected. But even today we’re still two different companies. We’re still very focused on letting our investors and customers know what we do, and Leidos still has a pretty diverse portfolio from health systems and some engineering services. We compete in similar subsegments but not in all. We’re also organized very differently, we go to market differently. When the deal closes, where does that put your total revenue at? Right around $6.5 billion. You told me you wanted to get back to $11 billion. Should we expect more? No, not right away. That was very tongue in cheek at the time. You knew I’d remember though. Oh, I know. I remember it too, actually, because we laughed. There are lots of things we can do, but I felt very comfortable then and still do that we’ve got a great future and can grow the business organically as well as through acquisition. But it’s not to chase the size. It really is about the market leadership. Running good margins and providing good mission capabilities for our employees. I think our market is still very motivated by mission. Our employees are very motivated to serve in different capacities whether it’s in uniform or not. https://www.defensenews.com/interviews/2018/09/24/saic-boss-tackles-engility-acquisition-space-market-and-revenue-goals

  • Defense industry fighting DoD proposal to change performance payments

    25 septembre 2018 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Defense industry fighting DoD proposal to change performance payments

    By: Joe Gould WASHINGTON — The Pentagon’s proposed plan to lower the rate of progress and performance payments some companies receive on defense contracts is sending shockwaves through the industry and invited a backlash from three large trade associations. To incentivize defense firms to work more quickly and more efficiently for the taxpayer, Pentagon leaders want to create a tiered system that recognizes high performing companies with higher performance-based payments. Contractors, however, are balking at the Pentagon’s efforts to make them more accountable. While obscure to the general public, the proposed rule changes have rattled government contractors, which argue they would choke off funding for innovation, shackle them with more bureaucracy, increase the cost of military equipment— and hurt profits. The baseline performance- and progress-based payment rate for larger companies would be reset from 80 percent to 50 percent, with incremental increases or decreases based on new criteria proposed by DoD. If a contractor, for instance, delivers end items on time, hits milestone schedules, or avoids serious corrective action requests, it would win 10 percent bumps for each. (Small businesses would have their own schedule of incentives.) The National Defense Industrial Association is calling on DoD to rescind the regulation and collaborate with industry to create a different rule. One objection it has is the proposed rule would determine payment rates based on companies’ overall performance, as opposed to contract by contract. “The marching orders from Congress is we have to be faster, more innovative, to do better for the warfighter,” said NDIA Senior Vice President for Policy Wesley Hallman. But, under the proposed rule, a company that wants to take on a high-risk project that fails, “will later be judged on that thing the following December. They’re incentivized to take a low-risk approach.” Though Section 831 of the 2017 National Defense Authorization Act encourages DoD to use performance payments, NDIA argues the rule violate’s the law’s intent and that lessening companies' cash flow would slow payments to subcontractors and sap funding for independent research and development. “We’re doing our best to let them know how this will hurt industry,” said NDIA Director of Regulatory Policy Corbin Evans. The trade group’s comments were submitted at a public meeting Sept. 14 to consider changes the Pentagon proposed in August to federal acquisitions rules, the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulations Supplement. The Defense Department is holding another public meeting, Oct. 10, before the public comment period ends on Oct. 23. Both the Professional Services Council and the Aerospace Industries Association, which more than 300 companies in the aerospace and defense industry, also offered presentations in opposition. The move toward better stewardship of taxpayer dollars comes amid record Pentagon budget growth and amid a reorganization of the Pentagon’s acquisition, technology and logistics office, now due to finish in a few months. The move falls in line with Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment Ellen Lord’s efforts to halve the timeline of major defense acquisition programs, which are notoriously slow. “I believe the lifeblood of most industry is cash flow, so what we will do is regulate the percentage of payments or the amount of profit that can be achieved through what type of performance they demonstrate by the numbers,” Lord said in a Defense News interview last week. Hence, “we’re going to begin to reward companies through profit or through progress or performance payments, as a function of how they manage all of that, as well as quality and delivery and a variety of other things,” Lord said. Though it’s unclear whether DoD will formally move ahead with the rule by a Dec. 1 deadline, investors have already responded negatively to a reports on the changes, according to aerospace and defense sector analysts at Cowen and Company. “It will be a scramble for companies and DoD to compile the necessary data to evaluate the rate request. Under the current draft rule, DoD would need to evaluate the rate request in just one month for all its suppliers,” Roman Schweizer, of Cowen and Company, said in a note to investors Friday. “We suspect that will be very hard the first time and suggests this year may be too hard.” Still, Cowen analyst Cai von Rumohr downplayed the near-term effects, especially beyond the major primes. He speculated the proposed rule change will have negligible impact on contractor results in 2019 since it doesn’t apply to any current contracts; it’s very unlikely to go into effect before 2020, if ever; it will not apply to time and materials and fixed-price commercial terms contracts, and because it will only apply to some cost-plus contracts. https://www.defensenews.com/industry/2018/09/24/defense-industry-fighting-dod-proposal-to-change-performance-payments

  • L3 again goes to sea with another unmanned deal

    25 septembre 2018 | International, Naval

    L3 again goes to sea with another unmanned deal

    By Ross Wilkers L3 Technologies has made yet another acquisition to further build its unmanned maritime business, this time in a deal for surface vessel and related control systems provider ASV Global. Terms of the transaction were undisclosed. The deal also brings additional anti-submarine warfare and future surface combatant unmanned off-board sensor offerings, L3 said Monday. Unmanned sea vehicles and associated systems have been a focal point in New York City-based L3’s overall push to become what CEO Chris Kubasik has called a “nontraditional sixth prime.” That translates to being a more focused, high-end builder and integrator of technologies and other platforms called out in the 2017 National Security Strategy. L3 went on an unmanned maritime buying spree last year that saw it make deals for undersea drone maker OceanServer, battery and energy technology company Open Water Power and autonomy and sensor system provider Adaptive Methods. Headquartered in Louisiana and the U.K., ASV Global builds unmanned surface vessels sized between 10 and 42 feet that have software, control systems and other autonomy architectures. The company now operates as L3 ASV. Sea is not the only domain where L3 has a buyer with respect to unmanned platforms. In June, the company quietly paid $15 million to buy hybrid quadrotor unmanned aircraft maker Latitude Engineering. L3 has also been busy this year in acquiring companies in information security and space as part of its ongoing sixth prime transformation effort. https://washingtontechnology.com/articles/2018/09/24/l3-unmanned-asv-acquisition.aspx

  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - September 24, 2018

    25 septembre 2018 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - September 24, 2018

    ARMY EMCOR Government Services Inc., Arlington, Virginia (W91278-18-D-0095); Facility Services Management Inc., Clarksville, Tennessee (W91278-18-D-0096); Hospital Housekeeping Systems LLC, Austin, Texas (W91278-18-D-0097); J&J Maintenance Inc., Austin, Texas (W91278-18-D-0098); Jones Lang LaSalle Americas Inc., Washington, District of Columbia (W91278-18-D-0099); Valiant Government Services LLC, Hopkinsville, Kentucky (W91278-18-D-0100); and VW International Inc.,* Alexandria, Virginia (W91278-18-D-0101), will compete for each order of the $475,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for operations and maintenance, incidental repair and minor construction to support the U.S. Army Medical Command facilities. Bids were solicited via the internet with seven received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 23, 2023. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile, Alabama, is the contracting activity. Lockheed Martin Corp., Grand Prairie, Texas, was awarded a $289,176,455 modification (P00025) to contract W31P4Q-16-C-0036 for the procurement of 24 M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems launchers, training, spares and enhanced product improvement modifications. Work will be performed in Grand Prairie, Texas, with an estimated completion date of July 1, 2022. Fiscal 2018 other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $127,313,849 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity. Great Lake Dredge & Dock Co. LLC, Oak Brook, Illinois, was awarded a $113,167,400 firm-fixed-price contract for two new turning basins, widening, dredging and construction for the deepening and strategic widening of the Jacksonville Harbor Federal Channel and turbidity monitoring, endangered species monitoring, vibration monitoring, beach fill quality control, and sea turtle non-capture trawling. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Jacksonville, Florida, with an estimated completion date of Feb. 11, 2020. Fiscal 2017 and 2018 non-federal and federal operations and maintenance funds in the combined amount of $113,167,400 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville, Florida, is the contracting activity (W912EP-18-C-0021). JCB Inc., Pooler, Georgia, was awarded a $72,757,904 modification (P00009) to contract W56HZV-14-D-0066 for High Mobility Engineer Excavator Type-1 vehicles. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of April 28, 2019. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity. AM General LLC, South Bend, Indiana, was awarded a $51,302,430 firm-fixed-price contract for recapitalization of the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work will be performed in South Bend, Indiana, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 30, 2019. Fiscal 2017 other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $51,302,430 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W56HZV-18-C-0177). L-3 Communications Corp., Muskegon, Michigan, was awarded a $43,008,895 modification (P00058) to contract W56HZV-15-C-0119 for 184 Hydro Mechanically Propelled Transmissions for the Bradley and Multiple Launch Rocket Systems and ancillary hardware. Work will be performed in Muskegon, Michigan, with an estimated completion date of May 19, 2020. Fiscal 2017 and 2018 other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $43,008,895 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity. Benaka Inc.,* New Brunswick, New Jersey, was awarded a $42,654,933 firm-fixed-price contract for renovations to Vermont National Guard Buildings 130, 131, 132, 160 and 360. Bids were solicited via the internet with three received. Work will be performed in South Burlington, Vermont, with an estimated completion date of Feb. 19, 2020. Fiscal 2018 military construction funds in the amount of $42,654,933 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Concord, Massachusetts, is the contracting activity (W912WJ-18-C-0016). United Excel Corp., Kansas City, Missouri, was awarded a $40,137,541 firm-fixed-price contract for design build construction project that includes: abatement of hazardous materials, demolition of the old Wilford Hall and support buildings, relocation of the communications infrastructure and the construction of new surface parking and green areas, complete with storm drain and detention features. Bids were solicited via the internet with four received. Work will be performed in San Antonio, Texas, with an estimated completion date of March 2, 2021. Fiscal 2014 military construction funds in the amount of $40,137,541 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth, Texas, is the contracting activity (W9126G-18-C-0077). Navistar Defense, Lisle, Illinois, was awarded a $22,103,643 firm-fixed-price Foreign Military Sales (Iraq) contract for 4x4 and 6x6 trucks. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work will be performed in Lisle, Illinois, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 27, 2020. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance Army funds in the amount of $22,103,643 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W56HZV-18-F-0117). Mike Hooks LLC, Westlake, Louisiana, was awarded a $21,052,718 firm-fixed-price contract for maintenance dredging. Bids were solicited via the internet with four received. Work will be performed in Glemora, Louisiana, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 1, 2019. Fiscal 2016, 2017 and 2018 operations and maintenance Army funds in the amount of $21,052,718 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans, Louisiana, is the contracting activity (W912P8-18-C-0049). Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Company LLC, Oakbrook, Illinois, was awarded an $18,868,500 firm-fixed-price contract for dredging of Morehead City, Wilmington, Savannah and Brunswick harbors. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Morehead City, North Carolina; Wilmington, North Carolina; Savannah, Georgia; and Brunswick, Georgia, with an estimated completion date of April 15, 2019. Fiscal 2016, 2017 and 2018 operations and maintenance Army funds in the amount of $17,148,811 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Wilmington, North Carolina, is the contracting activity (W912PM-18-C-0020). Citi Approved Enterprise LLC,* Harvey, Louisiana, was awarded a $13,195,792 firm-fixed-price contract for Atchafalaya Basin floodway, Boeuf Lock, 2018 south chamber guide wall replacement. Bids were solicited via the internet with six received. Work will be performed in Morgan City, Louisiana, with an estimated completion date of April 30, 2020. Fiscal 2018 Mississippi River and Tributaries funds in the amount of $13,195,792 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans, Louisiana, is the contracting activity (W912P8-18-C-0052). Lobar Inc., Dillsburg, Pennsylvania, was awarded an $11,968,000 firm-fixed-price contract for restoration and modernization of Building 328. Bids were solicited via the internet with six received. Work will be performed in Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, with an estimated completion date of March 16, 2020. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance Army funds in the amount of $11,968,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore, Maryland, is the contracting activity (W912DR-18-C-0042). Miami Technology Solutions LLC,* Reston, Virginia, was awarded a $10,999,310 firm-fixed-price contract for road repairs at Arlington National Cemetery. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work will be performed in Arlington, Virginia, with an estimated completion date of March 23, 2023. Fiscal 2018 military construction funds in the amount of $10,999,310 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (W91236-18-C-0021). CACI NSS Inc., Chantilly, Virginia, was awarded a $10,407,551 firm-fixed-price contract for information technology and information management services. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Fort Detrick, Maryland, with an estimated completion date of May 31, 2023. Fiscal 2018 Defense Health Program operations and maintenance; Defense Health Program research, development, test and evaluation; Veterans Affairs operations and maintenance; and Air Force operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $10,407,551 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, is the contracting activity (W81XWH-18-F-0361). General Constructors Inc. of the Quad Cities,* Bettendorf, Iowa, was awarded a $10,405,500 firm-fixed-price contract for Mississippi River basin, river project office, Lock and Dam 14, and dock wall repair. Bids were solicited via the internet with four received. Work will be performed in Pleasant Valley, Iowa, with an estimated completion date of April 2, 2020. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance Army funds in the amount of $10,405,500 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Rock Island, Illinois, is the contracting activity (W912EK-18-C-0036). Manson Construction Co., Seattle, Washington, was awarded a $10,162,000 firm-fixed-price contract for Atchafalaya River and Bayous Chene, Boeuf and Black, Atchafalaya Bay and Bar Channel, maintenance dredging. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in St. Mary Parish, Louisiana, with an estimated completion date of March 23, 2019. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance Army funds in the amount of $10,162,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans, Louisiana, is the contracting activity (W912P8-18-C-0051). Pacific Shipyards International LLC,* Honolulu, Hawaii, was awarded a $10,031,114 firm-fixed-price contract for Essayons Dredge ship overhaul. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Honolulu, Hawaii, with an estimated completion date of April 30, 2019. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance Army funds in the amount of $10,031,114 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland, Oregon, is the contracting activity (W9127N-18-F-0178). GWWO Inc., Baltimore, Maryland, was awarded a $10,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for architect-engineering services. Bids were solicited via the internet with 23 received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 23, 2023. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (W91236-18-D-0008). Woolpert Inc., Dayton, Ohio, was awarded a $10,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for architect-engineering services. Bids were solicited via the internet with 23 received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 23, 2023. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (W91236-18-D-0012). Leidos Inc., Reston, Virginia, was awarded a $9,805,063 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to complete the integration, testing, and qualification of the design developed under Phase III of the RQ-7B Shadow Assured Positioning, Navigation, and Timing program. Three bids were solicited with two bids received. Work will be performed in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2020. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $5,272,645 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity (W911QY-18-F-0687). Dubuque Barge and Fleeting Service Co.,* Dubuque, Iowa, was awarded a $7,475,000 firm-fixed-price contract for removal of dredge material from Corps Island. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Red Wing, Minnesota, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 29, 2019. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $7,475,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul, Minnesota, is the contracting activity (W912ES-18-C-0010).  AIR FORCE  The Boeing Co., Ridley Park, Pennsylvania, has been awarded a $375,550,368 firm-fixed-price contract for the non-developmental item integration of four aircraft to replace the UH-1N. This is the basic award of a contract (including options) valued at approximately $2,380,000,000, which will provide for the acquisition and sustainment of up to 84 MH-139 helicopters, training devices, and associated support equipment. The location of performance is predominantly in Ridley Park, Pennsylvania; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. If all options are exercised, the work is expected to be completed by September 2031. This award is a result of a competitive acquisition. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test, and evaluation funds in the amount of $98,000,000 are being obligated at the time of award.  Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio,  is the contracting activity (FA8739-18-C-5030). Integrated Solutions for Systems Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, has been awarded a $17,500,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for the Weapons Effects Simulation Testing effort. This contract provides for research and development concepts and conventional inventory weapon systems.  Work will be performed at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, and is expected to be completed by Sept. 27, 2023. This award is the result of a broad agency announcement. Fiscal year 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $50,000 is being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin AFB, Florida, is the contracting activity (FA8651-18-D-0023/FA8651-18-F-0027). Universal Propulsion Co. Inc., Fairfield, California, has been awarded a $10,688,524 contract for supply of Modernized ACES II Electronic Sequencer for the ejection seat on some U.S. and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) aircraft.  Work will be performed in Fairfield, California, and is expected to be completed by May 31, 2019.  The contract involves foreign military sales to Oman, Portugal, Poland, Bahrain, Romania, Denmark, Singapore, Greece, Egypt, South Korea, Netherlands, Morocco, Saudi Arabia and Pakistan.  This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition.  Fiscal 2018 funding in the amount of $3,436,768; and FMS funding in the amount of $7,251,756 are being obligated at the time of award.  Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Hill Air Force Base, Utah, is the contracting activity (FA8213-18-C-0002). North Star Construction, Yuba City, California; and Beale Air Force Base, California, has been awarded a $9,749,650 modification to contract FA4686-17-D-0001 for 60KV power lines. Work will be performed at Beale Air Force Base, California, and is expected to be completed by Oct. 3, 2019.  Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $9,749,650 are being obligated at the time of award.  Total cumulative face value of the contract is $14,081,711. The 9th Contracting Squadron, Beale Air Force Base, California, is the contracting activity.  NAVY  Centerra Integrated Services LLC, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida (N69450-18-D-1312); Islands Mechanical Contractor Inc.,* Middleburg, Florida (N69450-18-D-1313); Munilla Construction Management LLC, Miami, Florida (N69450-18-D-1314); Ratcliff Construction Inc.,* Orange Park, Florida (N69450-18-D-1315); The Ross Group Construction Corp., Tulsa, Oklahoma (N69450-18-D-1316); and RQ-AECOM JV, Carlsbad, California (N69450-18-D-1317), are each awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple award design-build construction contract for construction projects located primarily within the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast area of responsibility.  The maximum dollar value including the base period and four option years for all six contracts combined is $240,000,000.  The work to be performed provides for, but is not limited to, general building type projects (new construction, renovation, alteration, demolition, and repair work) including industrial, airfield, aircraft hangar, aircraft traffic control, infrastructure, administrative, training, dormitory, and community support facilities.  No task orders are being issued at this time.  Work will be performed in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.  The term of the contract is not to exceed 60 months, with an expected completion date of September 2023.  Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $6,000 are obligated on this award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  Future task orders will be primarily funded by operations and maintenance (Navy); and Navy working capital funds.  This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website with 18 proposals received.  These six contractors may compete for task orders under the terms and conditions of the awarded contract.  The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southeast, Jacksonville, Florida, is the contracting activity. Black Construction Corp., Harmon, Guam, is awarded an $82,028,150 firm-fixed-price contract for the design and construction of an aircraft maintenance facility and a corrosion control hangar with supporting facilities at Joint Region Marianas, Andersen Air Force Base.  The work to be performed provides for the design and construction of (1) a low-rise airframes shop facility with slab-on-grade shallow foundation, reinforced concrete walls and roof, including windows, mechanical, and electrical systems appropriate to Guam earthquake and environmental conditions; and (2) a high-bay corrosion control hangar consisting of two bays: a planned maintenance interval bay and a corrosion control bay. The contract also contains two unexercised options, which if exercised, would increase cumulative contract value to $82,970,000.  Work will be performed in Yigo, Guam, and is expected to be completed by January 2021.  Fiscal 2018 military construction (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $82,028,150 are obligated on this award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with five proposals received.  The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Pacific, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, is the contracting activity (N62742-18-C-1300). Lockheed Martin, Rotary and Mission Systems, Moorestown, New Jersey, is awarded a $78,276,516 cost-plus-incentive-fee modification to previously-awarded contract N00024-13-C-5116 for Aegis Combat System Engineering Agent efforts for the design, development, integration, test and delivery of Advanced Capability Build 20. Work will be performed in Moorestown, New Jersey, and is expected to be completed by December 2021. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funding in the amount of $8,601,589 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. The Raytheon Co., McKinney, Texas, is awarded $46,114,946 for modification P00028 to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price, cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N00019-15-C-0116) for the procurement of four APY-10 radar system production kits for the Navy, eight for the government of the United Kingdom, four for the government of Australia, and related services in support of P-8A Poseidon aircraft production Lots 8 and 9.  Work will be performed in McKinney, Texas (77.1 percent); Andover, Massachusetts (7.1 percent); Chelmsford, Massachusetts (3.4 percent); Woodland Park, New Jersey (3.4 percent); Black Mountain, North Carolina (1.8 percent); San Carlos, California (1.7 percent); Ashburn, Virginia (1.6 percent); Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada (1.4 percent); Simsbury, Connecticut (1.3 percent); and Clearwater, Florida (1.2 percent), and is expected to be completed in September 2022.  Fiscal 2018 aircraft procurement (Navy); and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) funds in the amount of $46,114,946 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  This modification combines purchases for the Navy ($11,371,053; 25 percent); and FMS ($34,743,893; 75 percent).  The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Systems Application and Technologies Inc., Largo, Maryland, is awarded a $39,688,979 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity level of effort contract incorporating one firm-fixed-price contract line item number (CLIN), one cost-plus-fixed-fee CLIN and one cost-type CLIN for other direct costs for Waterfront Operations Support Services.  Waterfront Operations Support includes the operation of small watercraft, industrial maintenance and repair, and research and development, test, and evaluation project support with transition, program management, operations management of Building V-47 Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia, reporting, and safety compliance oversight.  Work will be performed in Norfolk, Virginia, and is expected to be completed by September 2023. Fiscal 2018 service cost center funding in the amount of $512,804 will be obligated at time of award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with five offers received. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, West Bethesda, Maryland, is the contracting activity (N00167-18-D-0009). Alion Science and Technology Corp., Washington, District of Columbia (N64498-18-D-4025); Amee Bay LLC,* Anchorage, Alaska (N64498-18-D-4026); American Systems Corp., Chantilly, Virginia (N64498-18-D-4027); Gibbs & Cox Inc., Arlington, Virginia (N64498-18-D-4028); L-3 Unidyne Inc., Norfolk, Virginia (N64498-18-D-4029); Life Cycle Engineering Inc., Charleston, South Carolina (N64498-18-D-4030); McKean Defense Group LLC, Washington, District of Columbia (N64498-18-D-4031); and NDI Engineering Co.,* Thorofare, New Jersey (N64498-18-D-4032), were awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-fixed-fee contracts for technical and engineering services in support of in-service engineering roles and responsibilities for electrical power and generation systems installed on surface ships, submarines and assault craft.  Alion Science and Technology Corp. will receive $38,625,259; Amee Bay LLC will receive $42,193,792; American Systems Corp. will receive $38,369,064; Gibbs & Cox Inc. will receive $33,953,721; L-3 Unidyne Inc. will receive $44,042,794; Life Cycle Engineering Inc. will receive $45,122,812; McKean Defense Group LLC will receive $41,480,653; and NDI Engineering Co. will receive $42,555,850.  Work will be performed at the contractors’ facilities and on-site at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Philadelphia Division in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and is expected to be completed by September 2023. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance (Navy); and fiscal 2018 other procurement (Navy) funding in the amount of $1,492,330 will be obligated at time of award and funds in the amount of $581,400 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. These contracts were competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with eight offers received. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Philadelphia Division, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity. (Awarded Sept. 21, 2018) URS Group Inc., Morrisville, North Carolina, is awarded $35,700,172 for firm-fixed-price task order N6945018F0085 under a previously awarded, multiple award construction contract (N62470-13-D-6022) for construction of phase two of Hurricane Irma repairs at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay.  The work to be performed provides for a modified/hybrid design build where the contractor is required to provide a designer of record for design development and design, construction submittal approval and oversight of all repairs such as building interiors/exteriors, roofs, piers, and wharfs as a result of Hurricane Irma.  Work also includes any and all ancillary and incidental mechanical and electrical support services needed to accomplish required work including, but not limited to, disconnects, temporary reconnects, removals, extensions, modifications, alterations, reinstalls, new components, and permanent reconnects necessary for functional operation.  Work will be performed in Kings Bay, Georgia, and is expected to be completed by March 2020.  Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance(Navy) contract funds in the amount of $35,700,172 are obligated on this award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  Three proposals were received for this task order.  The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southeast, Jacksonville, Florida, is the contracting activity. BAE Systems Land and Armaments, Louisville, Kentucky, is awarded an $18,499,843 firm-fixed-price delivery order basic ordering agreement N00174-18-G-0001 under previously-awarded contract N00174-18-F-0469 for Mk 38 machine gun system coaxial kits. This delivery order will provide all of the necessary materials and services required to manufacture, assemble, inspect, preserve, package and ship coaxial kits to support operations and maintenance for the Mk 38 machine gun systems used by the Navy and Coast Guard.  Work will be performed in Louisville, Kentucky (83 percent); and Mesa, Arizona (17 percent), and is expected to be completed by June 2020. Fiscal 2017 and 2018 weapons procurement (Navy) funding; and fiscal 2018 weapons procurement (Coast Guard) funding in the amount of $18,499,843 will be obligated on the delivery order at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division, Indian Head, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Architects Pacific Inc.,* Honolulu, Hawaii, is awarded a maximum amount $15,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity architect-engineering contract for design, engineering, specification writing, cost estimating, and related services at various locations in the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Hawaii area of responsibility (AOR).  The work to be performed provides for design and engineering services for specifications, cost estimates, design-build and design-bid-build (DBB) projects with associated multi-discipline architect-engineering support services including alterations, repair of buildings, structures and minor construction of various base development facility types.  Initial task order is being awarded at $592,254 for a DBB construction package, consisting of full plans, specifications, detailed cost estimate, and other services to replace the roof on Pacific Air Forces Wing Headquarters Building 1102H at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii.  Work for this task order is expected to be completed by July 2019.  All work on this contract will be performed at various Navy and Marine Corps facilities and other government facilities within the NAVFAC Hawaii AOR.  The term of the contract is not to exceed 60 months with an expected completion date of September 2023.  Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $592,254 are obligated on this award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  Future task orders will be primarily funded by operations and maintenance (Navy and Marine Corps); and Navy working capital funds.  This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website with seven proposals received.  The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Hawaii, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, is the contracting activity (N62478-18-D-5031).   Global Connections to Employment Inc., Pensacola, Florida, is awarded $13,028,622 for modification P00010 to extend the previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N68836-17-C-0005) to exercise option period two for full food and mess attendant services in support of Naval Air Station, Pensacola; and Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal School Elgin Air Force Base; and mess attendant services in support of Naval Construction Battalion Center, Gulfport.  The contract includes a one-month base period, two 12-month option periods, one 11-month option period, and a six-month extension option, which if all options are exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $45,737,677.  Work will be performed in Pensacola, Florida (60 percent); Elgin AFB, Florida (20 percent); and Gulfport, Mississippi (20 percent), and work is expected to be completed by September 2019. If all options on the contract are exercised, work will be completed by February 2021. Subject to the availability of funds, fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $13,028,622 will be incrementally funded throughout year, and funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  This contract is a sole-source procurement under the AbilityOne Program (Federal Acquisition Regulation Part 8.704). with one offer received.  Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center, Jacksonville, Florida, is the contracting activity. URS Group Inc., Morrisville, North Carolina, is awarded $12,278,673 for firm-fixed-price task order N6247018F9004 under a previously awarded multiple award global contingency construction contract (N62470-13-D-6022) for emergency runway repairs at Camp Baledogle, Somalia.  The work to be performed provides for repairs to runway consisting of full depth patching and overlay to allow required airfield operations.  Work will be performed in Baledogle, Somalia, and is expected to be completed by September 2019.  Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $12,278,673 are obligated on this award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  One proposal was received for this task order.  The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Atlantic, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity. Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., San Diego, California, is awarded $11,900,000 for modification P00002 to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N00019-18-C-1009) to provide continuing operations and maintenance efforts in support of the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance - Demonstrator Program (BAMS-D) program. This modification will allow the BAMS-D unmanned aircraft system to remain fully compliant with U.S. and overseas air traffic control authorities by modernizing the transponder and adding the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast capability to the aircraft. Work will be performed in Rancho Bernardo, California (75 percent); and Patuxent River, Maryland (25 percent), and is expected to be completed in June 2020.  Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $11,900,000 are being obligated at time of award, all of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.   The Boeing Co., Seattle, Washington, is awarded $9,044,214 for modification P00127 to a previously awarded fixed-price-incentive, firm-fixed-price contract (N00019-14-C-0067).  This modification provides for incorporation of P-8A change proposals 809-05553 “Optical Sensor Capability”; and 809-05450 “A-Kit and Aircraft Updates” into 18 full-rate production Lot 7) P-8A aircraft for the Navy.  Work will be performed in Jacksonville, Florida (93 percent); and Seattle, Washington (7 percent), and is expected to be completed in August 2021.  Fiscal 2016 aircraft procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $9,044,214 will be obligated at time of award, all of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year.  The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity.  DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Triumph Engine Control Systems LLC, West Hartford, Connecticut, has been awarded a maximum $77,507,491 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for control units. This is a five-year contract with no option periods. This was a limited competitive acquisition using justification from Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1(a)(2), which states only one responsible source and no other supplies or services will satisfy agency requirements, and extended to include only one or a limited number of responsible sources. Location of performance is Connecticut, with a Sept. 30, 2023, performance completion date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 through 2023 Army working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama (SPRRA1-18-D-0200). (Awarded Sept. 21, 2018) EFW Inc., Fort Worth, Texas, has been awarded a maximum $68,255,051 undefinitized, firm-fixed-priced delivery order (SPRPA1-18-F-L803) against a five-year basic ordering agreement (SPRPA1-13-G-004X) for various display replacements in support of the F/A-18 aircraft. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulations 6.302-1. Location of performance is Texas, with a May 11, 2022, performance completion date. Using service is Navy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 Navy working capital funds and Navy aircraft procurement funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Oakes Farms Food & Distribution Services LLC,* Naples, Florida, has been awarded a maximum $45,000,000 firm-fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for fresh fruits and vegetables. This was a competitive acquisition with four responses received. This is a 54-month contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Florida, with a March 23, 2023, performance completion date. Using customers are Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, and Department of Agriculture schools. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 through 2023 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE300-18-D-P335). Ruta Supplies Inc., Dover, New Jersey, has been awarded a maximum $15,241,323 firm-fixed-price contract for pneumatic supplies. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c) (1), based on Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1(a)(2). This is a three-year base contract with two one-year option periods. Location of performance is New Jersey, with a Sept. 23, 2021, performance completion date. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 through 2021 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is Defense Logistics Agency Land and Maritime, Columbus, Ohio (SPE7LX-18-D-0102).  Aerocontrolex Group Inc., doing business as TransDigm Inc., South Euclid, Ohio, has been awarded a maximum $7,536,743 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for aviation spare parts. This was a competitive acquisition with two responses received. This is a three-year base contract with one two-year option period. Location of performance is Ohio, with a Sept. 30, 2021, performance completion date. Using customer is Defense Logistics Agency. The type of appropriation is fiscal 2018 through 2021 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Ogden, Utah (SPE4AX-18-D-9007).  DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY  Prescient Edge Corp., McLean, Virginia, has been awarded a base-year plus four option years, with a potential six-month extension of services, time and materials contract (HHM402-18-C-0056) with an estimated ceiling of $65,080,499 to provide counterintelligence activity support services for the Defense Intelligence Agency’s (DIA) Office of Counterintelligence Counterespionage Division. Through this award, DIA will procure services to identify and neutralize threats to DIA personnel, information and missions. Work will be performed in the National Capital Region with an expected completion date of March 23, 2024. Fiscal 2018 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $7,286,800 are being obligated at time of award. This contract has been awarded through a 100 percent small business set-aside full and open competition and 20 offers were received. The Virginia Contracting Activity, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity.   DEFENSE THREAT REDUCTION AGENCY  URS Federal Services International Inc., Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, has been awarded a $42,825,276 ceiling cost-plus-fixed-fee task order under the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity (IDIQ) Cooperative Threat Reduction Integrating Contractor (CTRIC) III HDTRA1-18-D-0005 for Vietnam Increment II. This contract is for technical services in Vietnam to support the Weapons of Mass Destruction – Proliferation Prevention Program.  The anticipated completion date is Sept. 23, 2021, and includes options for additional site surveys and execution.   This task order was competitively sourced under CTRIC III IDIQ and the government received three offers.  Performance of this contract will take place at various locations throughout Vietnam.  Fiscal 2018 CTR funds in the amount of $5,400,000 are being obligated at time of award.  The Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, is the contracting activity  (HDTRA1-18-F-0114). (Awarded Sept. 20, 2018) *Small Business https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1643658/source/GovDelivery/

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    C'est très simple, il suffit de copier/coller le lien dans le champ ci-dessous.

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