Filtrer les résultats :

Tous les secteurs

Toutes les catégories

    12282 nouvelles

    Vous pouvez affiner les résultats en utilisant les filtres ci-dessus.

  • Here’s how the Trump administration could make it easier to sell military drones

    20 décembre 2017 | International, Aérospatial

    Here’s how the Trump administration could make it easier to sell military drones

    WASHINGTON — The United States is actively pursuing a change to a major arms control treaty that would open the door for wider exports of military drones. The proposed change to the Missile Technology Control Regime would make it easier for nations to sell the systems, also known as unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs, that fly under 650 km per hour, according to multiple sources who are aware of the efforts. The MTCR is an agreement among 35 nations that governs the export of missiles and UAVs. Under the terms of the MTCR, any “category-1” system capable of carrying 500-kilogram payloads for more than 300 kilometers is subject to a “strong presumption of denial.” Proponents of UAV exports argue that language, while appropriate for curtailing the sale of cruise missiles, should not group together expandable weapons and unmanned systems. Instead, they argue, UAVs should be looked at the same way fighter jets or other high-tech military vehicles are. As part of an effort to find a compromise, American officials floated a white paper during the latest plenary session on the MTCR in October, proposing new language to the treaty: that any air vehicle that flies under 650 kilometers per hour would drop to “category-2” and thus be subject to approval on a case-by-case basis. A State Department official confirmed to Defense News that the U.S. presented the white paper, and that American negotiators have zeroed in on the speed of the vehicles as a potential change to the treaty. However, the official declined to comment on the exact speed under consideration. “I can't confirm any specific numbers because it's treated — inside the MTCR — as proprietary ... particularly because there's a deliberative process,” the official said. “But I can tell you that speed is the thing that we, based on industry input and all, have looked at. And that's what we have discussed with partners. And I know other governments are also looking at speed as well, so we're all sort of coming to a similar conclusion.” Under the MTCR, a “presumption of denial” about exports for category-1 systems exists. In essence, that means countries tied into the MTCR need to have a very compelling case to sell them. However, the speed change, if adopted, would result in most drones used by the U.S. military dropping down from category-1 to category-2, allowing the U.S. to sell them through the traditional foreign military sale or direct commercial sale methods. “Treating drones as missiles is fundamentally incoherent. It reflects a 1980s view of the technology,” said Michael Horowitz, a former Pentagon official now with the University of Pennsylvania who has studied drone issues. “To the extent creating a speed delineation helps you get around that problem, it's a good practical solution.” The impact of speed Most medium-altitude, long-endurance systems like General Atomics' MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper fly at slow speeds, with the Reaper clocking in with a cruise speed of 230 mph or 370 kph, according to an Air Force facts sheet. Northrop Grumman's RQ-4 Global Hawk, a high-altitude ISR drone, flies only at a cruise speed of about 357 mph or 575 kph. The 650 kph ceiling would also keep the door open for companies developing cutting-edge rotorcraft that could be modified in the future to be unmanned — a key request made by the companies involved in the Future Vertical Lift consortium, said one industry source. Those companies include Bell Helicopter and a Sikorsky-Boeing team, both of which are developing high-speed rotorcraft that can fly at excess of 463 kph, or 250 knots, for the Army's Joint Multi Role technology demonstrator program. However, the limitation would ensure that some of the United States' most technologically advanced UAVs stay out of the grasp of other nations. For example, it would prevent the proliferation of jet-powered, fast moving flying wing drones like Boeing's Phantom Ray and Northrop Grumman's X-47B demonstrators, both of which can cruise at near-supersonic speeds. While the UAV industry wants the U.S. government to pick up the pace on drone export reform, the State Department and other agencies argue that a prudent approach is needed. For example, any change to the MTCR that loosens restrictions on low-speed drones also needs to be closely examined to ensure that missile technology is still strictly controlled. “We don't want any unintended consequences, so it has to be crafted carefully. We don't want to inadvertently drop something else out like a cruise missile,” the State Department official said. The focus on speed is particularly smart at a time when countries are focused on increasing the speed of their munitions, Horowitz said. He pointed to growing investments in hypersonic weapons as an example where creating a speed delineation in the MTCR would allow the U.S. to push for greater UAV exports while “holding the line on exports of next-generation missiles.” Industry desires Industry has long argued that the United States has taken an overly proscriptive route, hamstringing potential drone sales to allies and pushing them into the arms of more nefarious actors such as China, the other major UAV producer on the worldwide market. Modifying the MTCR is just one facet of the Trump administration's review of drone export policy, which also includes taking a second look at domestic regulations that can be amended by the president at will. Because changes to the MTCR require consensus among the regime's 35 member countries, industry sees it as a direly-needed, but long-term solution. “Now we have lighter-than-air vehicles; we have intelligence, surveillance reconnaissance [UAVs]. We still have cruise missiles, we have aircraft that could autonomous for cargo and other purposes. But [the MTCR] doesn't distinguish between any of that, so a revisit of those MTCR rules is in order for things that fly and can fly autonomously,” said Aerospace Industries Association President David Melcher during a December 14 roundtable with reporters. American firms are particularly concerned about losing out on sales in the Middle East. China has already exported its Wing Loong — a medium altitude, long endurance UAV that resembles General Atomics' MQ-1 Predator — to multiple countries worldwide, including some close U.S. partners such as Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. Meanwhile, sales of U.S.-made drones have been rarer, with many Middle Eastern countries such as the UAE only able to buy unarmed versions of American UAVs, even though those nations regularly purchase more technologically advanced weaponry like fighter jets from the United States. The State official noted that any change in the MTCR would not need to wait until the next plenary session, but could be introduced in some form as early as an April technical meeting. And at least one industry source was optimistic about the administration's MTCR reform plan. “They're taking a pretty smart process in not trying to tackle everything at once, but trying to get some of the language corrected in small bites,” the source said. “I don't see this as being an overnight process. I don't think we're going to end up in the next six months with a brand new MTCR policy.” However, Horowitz warned that the nature of the MTCR, where any single country could veto such a change, means getting any changes will not be easy. Russia, for example, could block the move not on technical reasons but geopolitical ones, given relations between Moscow and Washington. If that happens, Horowitz noted, the U.S. could potentially look to apply the 650 kph speed definition on its own, something possible because of the voluntary nature of the MTCR. https://www.defensenews.com/air/2017/12/19/heres-how-the-trump-administration-could-make-it-easier-to-sell-military-drones/

  • Le gouvernement du Canada a recours à l’approvisionnement pour aider les petites entreprises à croître et à créer des emplois

    18 décembre 2017 | Local, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Le gouvernement du Canada a recours à l’approvisionnement pour aider les petites entreprises à croître et à créer des emplois

    Solutions innovatrices Canada, un programme de 100 millions de dollars, stimulera l'innovation et créera des emplois pour la classe moyenne Le 14 décembre 2017 — Ottawa En tant que principal acheteur de biens et de services canadiens, le gouvernement du Canada fera appel à l'approvisionnement pour aider les petites entreprises du pays à innover et à commercialiser leurs innovations. Le ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, l'honorable Navdeep Bains, et la leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes et ministre de la Petite Entreprise et du Tourisme, l'honorable Bardish Chagger, ont annoncé aujourd'hui la mise sur pied de Solutions innovatrices Canada, un programme de 100 millions de dollars qui incite les petites entreprises canadiennes à mettre au point des solutions novatrices pour répondre aux défis proposés par les ministères et les organismes fédéraux. Que le défi soit de trouver un moyen d'augmenter la résistance du blindage aux produits chimiques ou encore d'améliorer la connexion sans fil des véhicules connectés, les ministères et les organismes fédéraux demanderont aux petites entreprises d'innover et de proposer une solution. Le gouvernement s'associera ensuite à l'entreprise retenue et agira comme son premier client, en l'aidant à commercialiser son idée et à promouvoir la génération suivante de solutions qui pourront devenir des produits commerciaux viables. Vingt ministères et organismes fédéraux participeront au nouveau programme en ciblant des problèmes d'ordre militaire, économique ou environnemental. Solutions innovatrices Canada est un élément clé du Plan pour l'innovation et les compétences du gouvernement du Canada, une stratégie pluriannuelle visant à créer des emplois bien rémunérés pour la classe moyenne. Citations « Le nouveau programme Solutions innovatrices Canada mis de l'avant par notre gouvernement aura des retombées à bien des niveaux. Nous agissons de façon proactive et transformons nos défis en possibilités : des possibilités d'innovation, de croissance économique et de réussite des petites entreprises qui mèneront à l'établissement d'une économie d'innovation dynamique et à la création d'encore plus d'emplois pour la classe moyenne canadienne. » — Le ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique, l'honorable Navdeep Bains « Nous croyons que les petites entreprises innovatrices canadiennes sont bien placées pour aider le gouvernement à relever certains défis particulièrement coriaces. Par l'entremise du programme Solutions innovatrices Canada, nous demanderons aux entrepreneurs de créer de nouveaux produits et services qui nous aideront à relever ces défis, et nous les aiderons à prendre de l'expansion dans de nouveaux marchés et à trouver de nouveaux clients à l'échelle internationale. Les avantages de ce programme sont clairs : le gouvernement du Canada pourra obtenir de nouveaux produits et services pour améliorer son travail, et des exploitants de petites entreprises qui redoublent d'efforts pour réussir pourront prendre de l'expansion et créer des emplois bien rémunérés pour la classe moyenne. » — La leader du gouvernement à la Chambre des communes et ministre de la Petite Entreprise et du Tourisme, l'honorable Bardish Chagger « Notre communauté d'investisseurs, d'incubateurs et d'accélérateurs offre de l'encadrement, ouvre des portes et fournit du capital aux entreprises canadiennes en démarrage qui cherchent à croître et à se développer. Dans bien des cas, le fait de décrocher un “premier client” constitue une validation essentielle qui permet à ces entreprises de s'implanter sur le marché local et le marché mondial. Le programme Solutions innovatrices Canada qui a été annoncé aujourd'hui aidera les entreprises canadiennes à b'tir leur clientèle plus tôt et permettra aux Canadiens de bénéficier de l'adoption de solutions innovatrices conçues ici au pays. » — La présidente du conseil d'administration de la National Angel Capital Organization (NACO Canada), Sandi Gilbert Faits en bref Le financement du programme sera fourni par les 20 ministères et organismes participant au programme Solutions innovatrices Canada. Chaque entité réservera 1 % de ses dépenses de recherche-développement à cette initiative. Solutions innovatrices Canada est modelé sur le programme américain Small Business Innovation Research. Il constitue une composante essentielle des efforts du gouvernement du Canada pour aider les petites entreprises. Solutions innovatrices Canada encouragera les entreprises détenues et dirigées par des femmes, des Autochtones, des jeunes et des groupes traditionnellement sous représentés à présenter des soumissions. https://www.canada.ca/fr/innovation-sciences-developpement-economique/nouvelles/2017/12/le_gouvernement_ducanadaarecoursalapprovisionnementpouraiderlesp.html

  • American exodus? 17,000 US defense suppliers may have left the defense sector

    14 décembre 2017 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    American exodus? 17,000 US defense suppliers may have left the defense sector

    WASHINGTON — A large number of American companies supplying the U.S. military may have left the defense market, according to a study announced Thursday, raising alarm over the health and future of the defense industrial base. The Center for Strategic and International Studies study said the number of first-tier prime vendors declined by roughly 17,000 companies, or roughly 20 percent, between 2011 and 2015. The full study, due to be released in January, was authored by CSIS Defense-Industrial Initiatives Group Director Andrew Hunter, Deputy Director Gregory Sanders and Research Associate Rhys McCormick. It was sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School and co-produced by the Aerospace Industries Association, which released an executive summary on Dec. 14, the day of its annual aerospace and defense luncheon in Washington. The authors, who used publicly available contract data, write that it's unclear — due to the limitations in the subcontract database —whether the companies have exited the industrial base entirely or still perform work at the lower tiers. “There is no doubt that a huge portion of the recent turbulence in the defense industrial base has taken place among subcontractors, who are less equipped to tolerate the defense marketplace's funding uncertainly and often onerous regulatory regime — yet it remains extremely difficult to determine the real impact of these conditions on subcontractors,” the authors conclude. Further details may yet be revealed by the Trump administration's ongoing review of the resiliency of the defense-industrial base. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis' assessment is due to President Donald Trump by mid-April 2018. The CSIS summary links 2011 Budget Control Act caps, subsequent short-term budget agreements, and Congress' “unpredictable and inconsistent” appropriations process to the “lost suppliers, changes in competition and market structure, and other turmoil” it found. The years 2011-2015 are considered a period of defense drawdown and decline. The authors, rather than focus strictly on the total decline of defense contract obligations over the entire period, chose to chart the “whipsaw” effect that struck certain sectors of the industrial base amid the imposition of sequestration in 2013 and subsequent budget caps. Though the defense budget had been declining in the years leading up to the Budget Control Act, the implementation of an across-the-board sequestration budget cut in 2013 “marked a severe market shock that had a considerable impact on the defense industry,” the authors say. Compared to the pre-drawdown fiscal 2009-2010 period, the start of the drawdown in fiscal 2011-2012, average annual defense contract obligations dropped 5 percent. When sequestration was triggered in fiscal 2013, defense contract obligations dropped 15 percent from the previous year. Average annual defense contract obligations fell 23 percent during the so-called BCA decline period, fiscal 2013-2015. The Army, which has a checkered modernization history, bore the brunt of the decline. Average annual defense contracts dropped 18 percent at the start of the drawdown, then 35 percent during the BCA decline period. Missile defense contract obligations actually gained 7 percent at the start of the drawdown and then dropped only 3 percent under budget caps. During his presidency, Barack Obama reversed course from early cuts to missile defense to spur the development and deployment of missile defense systems in Europe, Asia and the Middle East. Lockheed Martin CEO Marillyn Hewson reacted to the internally circulated findings earlier this month, saying budget cuts are responsible for the industry being “more fragile and less flexible than I've seen it, and I've been in the industry many, many years.” “What we've seen in the industry, I'll give you an example at Lockheed Martin: At the outset of budget cuts we were about 126,000 employees; today we are at 97,000 employees,” Hewson said at the Reagan National Defense Forum in California. “Our footprint has shrunk dramatically. We see some of our small and medium-sized business, some of the components that we need, there's one, maybe two suppliers in that field where there were many, many more before.” Budget cuts have squeezed the Defense Department to unduly prioritize low-cost contracts over innovation and investment. Cost “shootouts,” she said, are endangering the military's plans to grow in size and lethality. AIA Vice President for National Security Policy John Luddy said companies have coped through a variety of “healthy efficiencies,” such as mergers and acquisitions, consolidating facilities, exploring shared services, and offloading certain contracting activities. “Our companies have done an amazing job of managing the downturn, they've pulled all kinds of levels to make it work, they've shown the ingenuity of the American free market system,” Luddy said. “Nonetheless, the uncertainty of the budgeting process has become a huge challenge for us.” Army Secretary Mark Esper, formerly of Raytheon, warned lawmakers at a Senate hearing Dec. 7 that uneven funding is driving small suppliers — “an engine of innovation” — out of the defense sector. “If you're a small mom and pop shop out there, and I'm referring to my industry experience, it's hard for them to survive in the uncertain budgetary environment,” Esper said. “And we risk losing those folks who may over time decide that they're going to get out of the defense business and go elsewhere. So that's a big threat to our supply chains.” But the CSIS study found that small vendors either increased their share of platform portfolio contract obligations or held steady, while large and medium vendors were most harmed by the market shock from sequestration and the defense drawdown. https://www.defensenews.com/breaking-news/2017/12/14/american-exodus-17000-us-defense-suppliers-may-have-left-the-defense-sector/

  • Government launches CF-188 replacement program with interim Hornet buy

    13 décembre 2017 | Local, Aérospatial

    Government launches CF-188 replacement program with interim Hornet buy

    Canada will acquire 18 F/A-18 Hornets and associated spare parts from the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) to augment its fleet of CF-188 fighter jets until a replacement is selected and brought into service in 2025. Government ministers and senior officials confirmed the widely anticipated plan to buy 30-year-old F/A-18A/B legacy Hornets at a press conference on Dec. 12, putting to rest a previous proposal to acquire 18 F/A-18E/F Super Hornets. The Liberal government had announced in November 2016 a plan to buy the Boeing-built Super Hornets as an interim measure to address an urgent capability gap in the fighter fleet. Although the possible sale was approved by the U.S. State Department in September, the government ceased all discussions with Boeing after the company issued a trade complaint against Montreal-based Bombardier over the sale of the C Series jetliner to Delta Air Lines. “We have received a formal offer for sale of F-18 aircraft from the government of Australia, which we intend to pursue. And we have received an offer of Super Hornets from the U.S. government, which we intend to let expire,” said Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Public Services and Procurement. At the same time, the government officially launched a $15 to $19 billion competition to procure 88 aircraft to replace the entire fleet of Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) legacy Hornets by inviting interested governments and manufacturers to join a suppliers list. Qualtrough said the list would allow the government to identify and “share sensitive information” with eligible governments, manufacturers and suppliers able to meet Canada's needs. “All suppliers are welcome to participate in the process. No firm is excluded,” she said. Engagement with industry, which has been ongoing since 2012, is expected to lead to a request for proposals by the spring of 2019, followed by a contract award in 2022. Delivery of the first aircraft would begin in 2025. While ministers and senior officials stressed an “open and transparent” competition, the government also introduced a new criterion in the evaluation of company's bid: Its impact on Canadian economic interests, a measure journalists quickly dubbed the “Boeing clause.” “This new assessment is an incentive for all bidders to contribute positively to Canada's economy,” said Qualtrough. “When bids are assessed this will mean that bidders responsible for harming Canada's economic interests will be at a distinct disadvantage compared to bidders who aren't engaged in detrimental behaviour.” A government official, speaking on background, acknowledged that “many of the suppliers we deal with on defence procurements have several business lines and global reach. We are seeking to leverage (these) procurements to incentivize favourable economic conduct towards Canada and discourage detrimental actions by commercial suppliers.” Qualtrough said the assessment, which will be used in future procurements, would be developed through consultations with industry. “All proposals will be subject to the same evaluation criteria. “The assessment of economic impact will be done at the time of the assessment of the bids,” she added, an indication that much could change between the government and Boeing by 2019. The eventual CF-188 replacement program will include aircraft, sustainment, infrastructure, and aircrew and maintenance training, and will generate billions for Canadian industry in industrial and technological benefits, said Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, noting that the industrial and technological benefits (ITB) policy has already generated over $40 billion in economic investment. “If you think that sounds impressive, the economic benefits of these new fighter jets will add significantly to those ITB numbers. This is an enormous investment in a very important sector for us. That's why our government feels it's important to do business with trusted partners.” MINDING THE GAP The Liberal government has faced pointed criticism on a number of fronts for claiming a capability gap. During Question Period on Tuesday, Conservative Member of Parliament Tony Clement suggested the capability gap does not exist. “It's a fairy tale created by Liberals to justify their political decisions,” he said. Gen Jonathan Vance, Chief of the Defence Staff, countered that criticism during the press conference, claiming the RCAF cannot generate enough mission-ready aircraft to meet North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) commitments simultaneously. “The RCAF cannot concurrently meet those obligations now without some form of supplemental capability until a future fighter fleet is in place,” he said. “The acquisition of Australian F-18s is a logical choice.” Senior officials with the RCAF and Department of National Defence (DND) said the Australian Hornets would “integrate seamlessly” with the CF-188s. Both fleets have similar operating requirements and share comparable training systems, all of which can be supported by existing supply chains and frontline maintainers. Both countries have cooperated on fleet management and system upgrades, and shared test data, “so we know the jets well,” said the DND official. “We know the state of their aircraft and what modifications may be needed to operate them until the [new] fleet is in place.” Montreal-based L3 MAS, responsible for maintaining Canada's CF-188s since they first entered service in the 1980s, has also performed centre barrel replacements on a number of Australian jets as part of a fuselage life extension program. However, Canada recently began additional structural modifications to ensure the Hornets can operate through 2025, and the Australian F-18s will need to be modified to a similar standard. The government must still negotiate the final price tag for the 18 jets, modifications and spare parts, but a senior official estimated it would be about one-tenth the cost of 18 Super Hornets and associated mission and weapon systems and support, which the U.S. State Department estimated at US$5.23 billion. “Specific dollar amounts will be available once we have finalized an agreement with Australia,” he said. If an agreement is reached, the first Australian Hornets would begin arriving in 2019 and the capability gap would be closed by the end of 2021, two years faster than the planned delivery of the Super Hornets, officials said. The RCAF had planned to deploy the Super Hornets as a standalone squadron at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alta. The senior Air Force official said the force structure had not yet been finalized, but would likely involve aircraft being placed across the operational and training squadrons at 4 Wing and 3 Wing Bagotville, Que. He also acknowledged that more aircraft would mean a need for more pilots and technicians, and that “retention and recruitment efforts were underway to meet this requirement.” https://www.skiesmag.com/news/government-launches-cf-188-replacement-program-interim-hornet-buy/

  • Le gouvernement lance un processus concurrentiel ouvert et transparent afin de remplacer les chasseurs du Canada

    12 décembre 2017 | Local, Aérospatial

    Le gouvernement lance un processus concurrentiel ouvert et transparent afin de remplacer les chasseurs du Canada

    Communiqué de presse De Services publics et Approvisionnement Canada Le 12 décembre 2017 - Ottawa (Ontario) - Gouvernement du Canada L'une des principales priorités du gouvernement du Canada est de faire l'acquisition d'aéronefs dont les Forces canadiennes ont besoin afin d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens, tout en assurant des retombées économiques pour le Canada. Le gouvernement honore sa promesse de mener un processus concurrentiel ouvert et transparent en vue de remplacer en permanence la flotte de chasseurs du Canada. Comme l'indique la politique de défense Protection, Sécurité, Engagement, le Canada fera l'acquisition de 88 chasseurs sophistiqués. Il s'agit du plus important investissement dans l'Aviation royale canadienne en plus de 30 ans. Cet investissement est essentiel, car il permettra d'assurer la sécurité des Canadiens et de remplir les obligations internationales du Canada en matière de défense. Gr'ce à ce processus concurrentiel, le gouvernement du Canada pourra obtenir le bon chasseur à un juste prix et générer des retombées économiques optimales pour les Canadiens. Le gouvernement veillera à ce que les fabricants et les industries canadiennes de l'aérospatiale et de la défense soient consultés au cours du processus. Les propositions feront l'objet d'une évaluation rigoureuse qui portera sur le coût, les exigences techniques ainsi que les retombées économiques. Comme il importe de faire affaire avec des partenaires de confiance, l'évaluation des propositions comprendra aussi un volet sur l'incidence des soumissionnaires sur les intérêts économiques du Canada. S'il est établi à l'évaluation des propositions qu'un soumissionnaire nuit aux intérêts économiques du Canada, ce soumissionnaire sera nettement désavantagé. Ce nouveau volet de l'évaluation ainsi que les lignes directrices sur son application comme outil d'approvisionnement courant seront définis par la tenue des consultations appropriées. De plus, la Politique des retombées industrielles et technologiques s'appliquera à ce marché, c'est-à-dire que le fournisseur retenu sera tenu d'investir au Canada une somme égale à la valeur du contrat. D'ici à ce que les chasseurs qui remplaceront en permanence la flotte actuelle soient en place et opérationnels, le Canada doit s'assurer que les Forces armées canadiennes disposent de l'équipement dont elles ont besoin pour continuer de mener à bien leurs missions, ainsi que respecter ses obligations internationales. Par conséquent, le gouvernement du Canada entend procéder à l'achat de 18 chasseurs supplémentaires auprès du gouvernement de l'Australie. Citations « Comme nous l'avons promis, notre gouvernement lance un processus concurrentiel ouvert et transparent en vue de remplacer notre flotte de chasseurs par 88 appareils sophistiqués. Nous renforçons par ailleurs notre flotte de CF-18 en faisant l'acquisition de chasseurs auprès de l'Australie, pendant que nous menons à bien ce processus d'approvisionnement complexe et important. Nous annonçons donc aujourd'hui que nous nous assurons que nos militaires continuent de disposer de l'équipement dont ils ont besoin pour protéger les Canadiens. Nous comptons aussi tirer parti de ce processus d'approvisionnement pour renforcer les industries canadiennes de l'aérospatiale et de la défense, créer de bons emplois pour la classe moyenne et servir nos intérêts économiques. » L'honorable Carla Qualtrough Ministre des Services publics et de l'Approvisionnement « Nos militaires assument l'énorme responsabilité de veiller à la sécurité des Canadiens tous les jours. L'annonce d'aujourd'hui constitue un jalon important d'un processus qui permettra de doter nos militaires de l'équipement dont ils ont besoin pour s'acquitter de cette responsabilité, ainsi que de remplir les engagements que nous avons pris envers nos partenaires et nos alliés partout dans le monde. » L'honorable Harjit S. Sajjan Ministre de la Défense nationale « Ce projet offre l'occasion de soutenir la compétitivité à long terme des industries canadiennes de l'aérospatiale et de la défense, qui représentent, ensemble, plus de 240 000 emplois au Canada. Nous sommes déterminés à tirer parti de l'acquisition de la future flotte de chasseurs pour soutenir l'innovation, favoriser la croissance des fournisseurs canadiens, y compris les petites et moyennes entreprises, et créer des emplois pour les Canadiens de la classe moyenne. » L'honorable Navdeep Bains Ministre de l'Innovation, des Sciences et du Développement économique Faits en bref L'annonce d'aujourd'hui marque le début officiel du lancement du processus concurrentiel ouvert visant à remplacer la flotte de chasseurs du Canada. Dans un premier temps, le gouvernement dressera une liste de fournisseurs, qui comprendront des gouvernements étrangers et des fabricants de chasseurs ayant démontré qu'ils étaient capables de répondre aux besoins du Canada, comme il est défini dans l'invitation aux fournisseurs inscrits sur la liste. Toutes les entreprises sont invitées à participer au processus. Une planification approfondie et la mobilisation des intervenants se dérouleront tout au long de 2018 et de 2019. L'attribution du contrat est prévue en 2022, et la livraison du premier chasseur en 2025. Le gouvernement mobilisera les gouvernements étrangers, les fabricants de chasseurs et les industries canadiennes de l'aérospatiale et de la défense pour s'assurer que tous sont bien placés pour participer au processus. L'achat de 88 aéronefs représente une augmentation de la taille de la flotte de plus d'un tiers par rapport à ce qui était prévu avant la politique de défense Protection, Sécurité, Engagement (65 appareils). Ensemble, les industries canadiennes de l'aérospatiale et de la défense représentent plus de 240 000 emplois de qualité. L'aérospatiale est l'une des industries les plus innovatrices et les plus tournées vers l'exportation au Canada. Elle assure plus de 28 milliards de dollars par année au produit intérieur brut du Canada. L'industrie canadienne de la défense compte plus de 650 entreprises qui offrent des emplois de grande qualité à des travailleurs hautement qualifiés. Liens connexes Remplacer et compléter la flotte de CF-18 du Canada Remplacement des CF-18 L'état de l'industrie aérospatiale canadienne : rapport de 2017 https://www.canada.ca/fr/services-publics-approvisionnement/nouvelles/2017/12/le_gouvernement_lanceunprocessusconcurrentielouvertettransparent.html

  • Remplacer et compléter la flotte de chasseurs canadiens

    12 décembre 2017 | Local, Aérospatial

    Remplacer et compléter la flotte de chasseurs canadiens

    Annoncée en juin 2017, la politique de défense du Canada : Protection, Sécurité, Engagement a réaffirmé l'engagement du gouvernement à investir de façon appropriée dans les forces armées. Le 12 décembre 2017, le gouvernement du Canada a lancé un processus concurrentiel d'approvisionnement ouvert et transparent en vue de remplacer de façon permanente l'actuelle flotte de chasseurs du Canada par 88 appareils de pointe. L'achat de 88 aéronefs représente une augmentation de la taille de la flotte de plus d'un tiers par rapport à ce qui était prévu avant la politique de défense : Solide sécuritaire et engagée (65 aeronefs). La Politique des retombées industrielles et technologiques s'appliquera à ce marché. Celle-ci vise à maximiser les débouchés pour les entreprises canadiennes, à soutenir l'innovation par la recherche et le développement et à multiplier les possibilités d'exportation pour le Canada. Toutes les entreprises sont invitées à participer au processus. Consultations Le gouvernement prendra le temps nécessaire pour veiller à ce que l'industrie aérospatiale et de la défense ainsi que les fournisseurs commerciaux canadiens soient consultés et mobilisés à propos de ce processus, et qu'ils soient bien positionnés pour y participer. Le Canada organisera une Journée de l'industrie sur le thème du futur chasseur, le 22 janvier 2018, à Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, 395, rue Wellington à Ottawa. Il sera question de présenter à l'industrie et aux gouvernements étrangers les renseignements dont ils ont besoin pour décider, en toute connaissance de cause, s'ils veulent participer à ce processus d'approvisionnement. De plus, l'événement permettra à l'industrie canadienne d'établir des contacts avec des gouvernements étrangers et des fabricants d'avions de chasse. Invitation à participer Le Canada commencera par dresser une liste de fournisseurs qui comprendra les gouvernements étrangers et les fabricants d'avions de chasse ayant fait la preuve de leur capacité à répondre aux besoins du Canada, tels que définis dans le document d'invitation à la Liste des fournisseurs. L'invitation à s'inscrire sur la Liste des fournisseurs est disponible sur le site achatsetventes.gc.ca. Toutes les entreprises sont invitées à participer au processus. Les demandes d'inscription sur la Liste des fournisseurs doivent être reçues avant le 9 février 2018. Une fois la Liste des fournisseurs officialisée, seuls ceux qui y figureront seront invités à participer aux activités de consultations subséquentes et à soumettre leur proposition pour ce marché. Consultations auprès des intervenants de l'industrie canadienne Parallèlement aux activités liées à la Liste des fournisseurs, on mobilisera les intervenants de l'industrie canadienne afin de recueillir et échanger des renseignements généraux en lien avec ce marché. Ainsi, les industries canadiennes de l'aérospatiale et de la défense seront bien positionnées pour y participer. Évaluation des propositions relatives à la capacité permanente Les propositions seront rigoureusement évaluées en fonction des coûts, des exigences techniques et des avantages économiques. Notre gouvernement juge important de faire affaire avec des partenaires de confiance. Cela étant, l'évaluation des soumissions sera assortie d'une évaluation de l'incidence globale des soumissionnaires sur les intérêts économiques du Canada. À l'étape de l'évaluation des soumissions, tout soumissionnaire jugé responsable d'un préjudice causé aux intérêts économiques du Canada sera nettement désavantagé. Ce nouveau critère, de même que les lignes directrices devant en régir l'application seront élaborés en menant les consultations appropriées. De plus, la Politique des retombées industrielles et technologiques s'appliquera à ce marché. Le fournisseur retenu sera donc tenu d'investir au Canada un montant égal à la valeur du contrat. Tous les fournisseurs seront assujettis aux mêmes critères d'évaluation. Prochaines étapes Les consultations avec les fournisseurs se poursuivront tout au long de 2018 et 2019 Il est prévu que les documents officiels d'invitation à soumissionner seront disponibles au printemps 2019 L'attribution d'un contrat est prévue en 2022 et la livraison du premier avion de chasse en 2025 Foire aux questions Processus d'approvisionnement concurrentiel Sur combien de temps s'étendra l'appel d'offres et quand le contrat sera-t-il attribué? Cet appel d'offres exige une préparation poussée assortie de véritables consultations des parties prenantes et de l'industrie Nous devons bien faire les choses et nous prendrons le temps nécessaire pour veiller à ce que les industries de l'aérospatiale et de la défense ainsi que les fabricants commerciaux canadiens soient consultés et qu'ils participent à ce processus L'attribution d'un contrat est prévue en 2022 et la livraison du premier avion de chasse en 2025 L'actuel calendrier de réalisation du processus n'est pas différent de celui appliqué à des appels d'offres lancés par des alliés et pays partenaires pour remplacer leurs flottes de chasseurs Pourquoi utilisez-vous une liste de fournisseurs? Les chasseurs et leurs systèmes embarqués sont des produits sensibles sur le plan de la sécurité et fortement contrôlés, si bien que la discussion de leur vente éventuelle passe nécessairement par l'existence d'ententes de coopération en matière de matériel de défense entre le Canada et ses partenaires et alliés Les trois critères inclus dans cette invitation visent à s'assurer que le Canada collabore avec des gouvernements étrangers qui exploitent des chasseurs susceptibles de répondre aux besoins du Canada en matière d'échange de renseignements dans le domaine de la défense, ainsi qu'avec les fabricants commerciaux qui produisent actuellement des avions de combat Cette étape permettra de recenser les avionneurs admissibles des pays partenaires et alliés qui présentent le potentiel voulu pour répondre aux besoins du Canada Leurs gouvernements respectifs ou leurs organisations de défense, ou les deux, devront également répondre aux besoins du Canada pour figurer sur la Liste des fournisseurs Qui peut s'inscrire sur la Liste des fournisseurs? Les gouvernements étrangers (ou les organisations de défense composées de pays participants), ainsi que les fabricants de chasseurs et d'autres entités commerciales qui sont en mesure de répondre aux besoins définis dans la description jointe à la Liste des fournisseurs, sont invités à soumettre une demande d'inscription afin de participer à l'appel d'offres La Liste des fournisseurs sera constituée d'équipes formées au minimum d'un gouvernement (ou d'une organisation de défense composée de pays participants) et d'un fabricant de chasseurs Ces équipes pourront également comprendre d'autres entreprises susceptibles de participer indirectement à une future proposition, sous réserve de l'approbation du Canada Une fois que la liste sera officialisée, seuls les fournisseurs y figurant seront invités à participer aux activités de consultations subséquentes et à soumettre des propositions Un gouvernement peut-il soumettre plus d'une réponse à l'invitation de la Liste des fournisseurs? Comme nous souhaitons, par ce processus ouvert et transparent, maximiser la concurrence, nous ne pouvons qu'encourager les gouvernements à inscrire plus d'un fabricant de chasseurs, suivant la définition apparaissant dans la Liste des fournisseurs La décision de soumettre plus d'un nom d'avionneur revient au gouvernement étranger ou à l'organisation de défense responsable Comment l'industrie canadienne peut-elle participer à la Liste des fournisseurs? La Liste de fournisseurs permettra de cerner des fournisseurs clés qui seront admissibles à la présentation d'une proposition, à savoir une organisation de défense ou un gouvernement étranger et un fabricant de chasseurs Ces fournisseurs seront tenus de soumettre une proposition de valeur, qui fera partie de leur soumission, dans laquelle ils décriront leurs engagements économiques envers le Canada Par conséquent, les fournisseurs seront poussés à former des partenariats avec l'industrie et des établissements postsecondaires canadiens au cours des prochains mois afin de mettre au point une solide proposition de valeur Le gouvernement collaborera avec les gouvernements étrangers, les fabricants de chasseurs et les secteurs canadiens de l'aérospatiale et de la défense pour veiller à ce qu'ils soient bien positionnés en vue de participer à ce marché À quels critères les fournisseurs devront-ils satisfaire pour être inscrits sur la Liste des fournisseurs? Chaque équipe devra désigner un gouvernement ou un chef de file national qui fera office de point de contact pour le Canada, et avoir un accord de coopération en vigueur avec le Canada en matière de matériel de défense L'avionneur de l'équipe devra répondre aux critères définis dans la Liste des fournisseurs Le gouvernement étranger ou l'un des pays participants devra exploiter l'un des chasseurs produits par l'avionneur proposé Le Canada examinera les inscriptions proposées pour déterminer si elles répondent à tous les critères de l'invitation à participer à la Liste des fournisseurs et se réserve le droit de demander des éclaircissements, au besoin Après examen des réponses, les fournisseurs recevront un courriel les avisant de la décision du Canada Le Canada peut-il supprimer ou ajouter un fournisseur dans la Liste des fournisseurs? Une fois qu'une équipe a été ajoutée à la liste des fournisseurs, elle peut se retirer en tout temps sur simple avis écrit adressé au Canada Un gouvernement étranger ou une organisation de défense étrangère peut tout autant et n'importe quand ajouter ou retirer une entreprise de son équipe sur simple avis écrit adressé au Canada, sous réserve de l'approbation de ce dernier Le Canada se réserve le droit de retirer, en tout temps, toute équipe ou entité figurant sur la Liste des fournisseurs si celle-ci présente des problèmes potentiels, perçus ou réels qui pourraient nuire à la sécurité nationale du Canada Ce marché comprend-il la consultation de l'industrie et des discussions sur les retombées industrielles et technologiques pour le Canada? La Politique des retombées industrielles et technologiques du gouvernement, qui exige des entrepreneurs qu'ils investissent au Canada un montant égal à la valeur du contrat, s'appliquera à ce marché De concert avec les fabricants de chasseurs et l'industrie canadienne, le gouvernement recherchera une proposition de valeur, assortie d'un objectif stratégique allant dans le sens de la croissance à long terme des secteurs de l'aérospatiale et de la défense du Canada Il s'agit notamment de promouvoir la croissance et l'innovation de l'industrie canadienne par des investissements en recherche et développement, d'offrir des occasions de perfectionnement aux fournisseurs, en particulier aux petites et moyennes entreprises, et de créer des possibilités d'exportation Le temps nécessaire sera consacré aux échanges avec les gouvernements étrangers, les fabricants de chasseurs et aux industries de l'aérospatiale et de la défense canadienne pour s'assurer qu'ils sont bien positionnés en vue de participer à ce marché Comment le Canada évaluera-t-il les propositions? Les propositions seront rigoureusement évaluées en fonction des coûts, des exigences techniques et des avantages économiques Par conséquent, l'appréciation des soumissions sera assortie d'une évaluation de l'incidence globale des soumissionnaires sur les intérêts économiques du Canada Lors de l'évaluation des soumissions, tout soumissionnaire responsable d'un préjudice causé aux intérêts économiques du Canada sera nettement désavantagé Ce nouveau critère, de même que les lignes directrices devant en régir l'application seront élaborés en menant les consultations appropriées Pourquoi tenir compte de l'incidence sur les intérêts économiques du Canada? Nous sommes continuellement à la recherche de moyens d'améliorer nos processus d'approvisionnement ainsi que les retombées pour la population canadienne Les marchés ont comme but, la formation de partenariats à long terme et efficaces et nous voulons nous voulons faire affaire avec des fournisseurs dont les activités concordent avec les intérêts économiques du Canada Cette démarche est conforme avec l'orientation énoncée dans la lettre de mandat de la ministre Qualtrough, qui décrit les directives visant à moderniser les pratiques d'approvisionnement afin d'appuyer, entre autres, nos objectifs de politique économique Comment le gouvernement veillera-t-il à ce qu'aucun avionneur ne bénéficie d'un avantage déloyal durant le processus d'approvisionnement? Le gouvernement s'est engagé à organiser un processus d'approvisionnement ouvert et transparent pour remplacer les chasseurs du Canada Le processus est supervisé par un contrôleur indépendant chargé de veiller à l'équité afin que tous les fournisseurs bénéficient de règles du jeu équitables Le Canada fera également appel à d'autres intervenants pour examiner, recueillir et diffuser des renseignements généraux sur l'approvisionnement, tout au long du processus d'approvisionnement Compléter la flotte existante Que fait le Canada pour s'assurer que les Forces armées canadiennes disposent du matériel dont elles ont besoin pendant que se déroule ce processus? Jusqu' à ce que les aéronefs de remplacement soient en place et pleinement opérationnels, le Canada doit veiller à ce que les Forces armées canadiennes disposent du matériel dont elles ont besoin pour continuer d'exécuter leurs missions et de respecter leurs obligations internationales Le Canada a reçu une proposition officielle du gouvernement australien portant sur la vente de F-18 Hornet, et il a l'intention d'y donner suite L'achat de ces F-18 nécessitera-t-il des changements aux infrastructures existantes du Canada? Le ministère de la Défense nationale est en train d'examiner ses infrastructures existantes afin de déterminer s'il y a lieu d'y apporter des changements Comment pouvez-vous être sûr que ces aéronefs seront fiables, sûrs et efficaces? Assurer la sécurité de nos hommes et de nos femmes en uniforme est, pour nous, une priorité absolue Les aéronefs australiens ont à peu près le même 'ge que la flotte canadienne de CF-18 L'Australie et le Canada ont tous deux beaucoup investi dans des modifications structurelles qui ont permis de prolonger la durée de vie structurale de leurs F-18 respectifs Plus récemment, et contrairement à l'Australie, le Canada a investi dans des modifications structurelles supplémentaires Les entreprises canadiennes possèdent l'expérience requise et effectuent déjà la plupart des travaux d'entretien de la flotte existante. Tout nouvel appareil sera entretenu dans le cadre des modalités existantes Tout comme nous le faisons pour la flotte actuelle, nous ferons les investissements nécessaires dans ces appareils pour nous assurer qu'ils répondent à toutes les exigences de l'Aviation royale canadienne Complément d'information Chasseurs Intégration de chasseurs australiens à la flotte actuelle de l'Aviation royale canadienne https://www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca/app-acq/amd-dp/air/snac-nfps/CF-18-fra.html

  • Federal government to link ‘economic interests’ to bids for fighter jets

    12 décembre 2017 | Local, Aérospatial

    Federal government to link ‘economic interests’ to bids for fighter jets

    DANIEL LEBLANC OTTAWA PUBLISHED 2 DAYS AGOUPDATED 2 DAYS AGO The federal government is vowing to make it harder for companies that harm Canada's "economic interests" to win major contracts, starting with the $26-billion competition to provide 88 new fighter jets to the Canadian Armed Forces. The new requirement will be fleshed out in coming months, with Procurement Minister Carla Qualtrough acknowledging that it will include a mix of "objective and subjective elements." Officially, the new "economic impact test" will apply to all bidders in major competitions, with Ms. Qualtrough and Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains insisting the requirement complies with Canadian and international law. Still, the new test was quickly dubbed the "Boeing clause" as it comes in response to U.S.-based Boeing Co.'s unresolved trade dispute with Canada's Bombardier Inc. Boeing said last April that the Canadian plane maker used unfair government subsidies to clinch an important contract for 75 CS 100 planes to Atlanta-based Delta Air Lines at "absurdly low" sale prices. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said the trade dispute will affect Boeing's future dealings with the government, which is now giving itself leverage to fight back in disputes with foreign companies. "Anyone can apply, but we've been very clear with this new policy: If there is economic harm to Canada, if there's an impact on Canadian jobs, if there's an impact to some of the key sectors in the Canadian economy, you will be at a distinct disadvantage," Mr. Bains said at a news conference. The new test was announced as the federal government confirmed it has cancelled plans to buy 18 new Super Hornet fighter jets from Boeing. The government is buying second-hand Australian fighter jets as an "interim" measure to help Canada's fleet of CF-18s to meet the country's international obligations. Defence analyst David Perry said the new economic impact test stands to create a new layer of complexity in military procurements that are already beset by delays. "If this is not a superficial, political assessment about whether or not the government of Canada likes this company or not, this will require bureaucratic time and effort to come up with a detailed assessment that will pass legal review," Mr. Perry said. Mr. Perry, a senior analyst at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, added that companies such as Boeing, which do billions of dollars of business and provide thousands of jobs in Canada, will be hard to box in specific categories. "Just coming down with some neat, clean assessment that says, on balance, this company is providing economic harm to Canada will be really difficult," Mr. Perry said. Boeing said that it is awaiting further details on the new economic impact test before deciding how to proceed on the upcoming competition for new jets. "We will review the Future Fighter Capability Project requirements for 88 jets, including the 'Boeing Clause,' and make a decision at the appropriate time," company spokesman Scott Day said. The federal government announced new details on the competition to replace Canada's fleet of CF-18s on Tuesday. A formal request for proposals is scheduled to be unveiled in spring, 2019, with a winning bidder announced in 2022. In addition to Boeing, other potential bidders include Lockheed Martin (F-35), Saab (Gripen), Dassault (Rafale) and Eurofighter (Typhoon). The opposition focused its attacks on the fact the government will be buying second-hand planes at an unspecified price instead of quickly launching a competition for new fighter jets. "We know these eighties-era jets are rusted out because a 2012 Australian report said corrosion was so bad that the number of active flying days had to be cut. This is not a bucket of bolts; this is a bucket of rusted-out bolts," Conservative MP Tony Clement said during Question Period. The government responded by blaming the Harper government for its failed attempt to buy F-35s without going to tenders. General Jonathan Vance, the Chief of the Defence Staff, said the requirements for the full fleet of new fighter jets have been redrawn since the days in which only the F-35 could qualify. https://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/federal-government-to-link-economic-interests-to-bids-for-fighter-jets/article37303772/

  • Intégration de chasseurs australiens à la flotte actuelle de l’Aviation royale canadienne

    12 décembre 2017 | Information, Aérospatial

    Intégration de chasseurs australiens à la flotte actuelle de l’Aviation royale canadienne

    Document d'information De Défense nationale Le 12 décembre 2017 – Ottawa (Ontario) – Défense nationale/Forces armées canadiennes Le Canada a annoncé récemment son intention de faire l'acquisition de chasseurs F-18 australiens pour compléter sa flotte actuelle. Ces appareils sont d''ge et de configuration similaires aux CF-18 de la flotte canadienne, et pourront donc être intégrés rapidement avec peu de mises à niveau, de formation et de modifications d'infrastructures. Afin d'intégrer ces chasseurs aux opérations de l'Aviation royale canadienne (ARC), les étapes suivantes seront franchies. Une fois terminées, les chasseurs acquis de l'Australie s'intégreront sans difficulté dans la flotte actuelle de CF-18. Mise à niveau et prolongement de la durée de vie utile Les F-18 seront modifiés et des travaux techniques seront réalisés pour que leur configuration soit similaire à celle des CF-18 canadiens, et pour veiller à ce qu'ils soient disponibles pour compléter la flotte de CF-18 jusqu'à l'acquisition d'une nouvelle flotte de chasseurs. Le Canada a beaucoup d'expérience dans ce type de modification avec sa flotte actuelle de chasseurs. La mise à niveau et l'entretien de la flotte actuelle de CF-18 seront toujours nécessaires. Le gouvernement du Canada a évalué la nature des travaux requis et les coûts associés pour entretenir la flotte actuelle et les appareils supplémentaires. Au fil des ans, l'Australie et le Canada ont fait d'importants investissements dans le développement de modifications structurelles et de capacités qui ont permis de prolonger la durée de vie structurale de leur flotte de F-18. Récemment, le Canada a investi dans le développement de modifications structurales supplémentaires, ce que l'Australie n'a pas fait. Ces modifications sont actuellement appliquées sur les appareils canadiens, et elles le seront également sur les avions australiens acquis par le Canada, ce qui permettra de prolonger leur durée de vie utile. Ces appareils sont actuellement employés dans le cadre d'opérations. Les inspections menées ont confirmé que leur durée de vie peut être prolongée et qu'ils peuvent être mis à niveau pour s'intégrer à notre flotte actuelle. Acquisition de pièces de rechange Le Canada fera aussi l'acquisition auprès du gouvernement australien de pièces de rechange pour maintenir en puissance les appareils supplémentaires et la flotte actuelle de CF-18 jusqu'à ce qu'une nouvelle flotte de chasseurs soit prête à l'action. Le Canada dispose également d'une chaîne d'approvisionnement déjà établie pour les pièces de F-18, qu'il continuera d'utiliser. Formation et personnel La formation requise pour piloter un F-18 australien est la même que pour la flotte actuelle de CF-18. Un plus grand nombre d'aéronefs requiert un plus grand nombre de pilotes, et plus de techniciens pour les entretenir. Tel qu'indiqué dans la politique de défense du Canada, Protection, Sécurité, Engagement, des efforts soutenus sont déployés en matière de recrutement et de maintien en service pour répondre aux besoins en personnel. Opérations Dans le cadre de la politique de défense du Canada, Protection, Sécurité, Engagement, les Forces armées canadiennes sont appelées à remplir leurs missions au pays, en Amérique du Nord et ailleurs dans le monde, et ce, simultanément. En ce qui concerne la capacité des chasseurs canadiens, l'Aviation royale canadienne doit pouvoir générer un nombre suffisant d'avions prêts à être déployés pour pleinement respecter les engagements pris par le Canada envers le NORAD et l'OTAN. À l'heure actuelle, le Canada ne dispose pas de suffisamment d'avions, ni de personnel pour respecter ces engagements simultanément. L'ajout d'avions supplémentaires permettra d'obtenir la capacité requise pour respecter nos engagements sans difficulté avec notre flotte actuelle. On prévoit que les premiers avions seront prêts à l'action au début des années 2020, après l'achèvement des mises à niveau structurelles pour les intégrer à la flotte de CF-18. Infrastructures Les appareils seront employés à la 4e Escadre Cold Lake et à la 3e Escadre Bagotville. Le MDN examine actuellement quels sont les besoins en matière d'infrastructures pour accueillir les nouveaux appareils. On s'attend à ce que les modifications requises soient minimales, étant donné que les chasseurs supplémentaires sont d''ge et de configuration similaires aux CF-18. Documents connexes Communiqué : Le Canada annonce son intention de remplacer la flotte de chasseurs Documentation : Mobilisation de l'industrie et des partenaires alliés Documentation : Définition du processus d'approvisionnement : le remplacement de la flotte de CF18 du Canada Documentation : Assurer des retombées économiques pour le Canada Documentation : Le rôle de la flotte de chasseurs CF-18 du Canada Lien pertinent CF-188 Hornet Contact Relations avec les médias Ministère de la Défense nationale Téléphone : 613-996-2353 Sans frais : 1-866-377-0811 Courriel : mlo-blm@forces.gc.ca https://www.canada.ca/fr/ministere-defense-nationale/nouvelles/2017/12/integration_de_chasseursaustraliensalaflotteactuelledelaviationr.html

  • RCMP issue warning after green laser pointed at plane northwest of Edmonton

    8 décembre 2017 | Local, Aérospatial, Sécurité

    RCMP issue warning after green laser pointed at plane northwest of Edmonton

    'The laser can temporarily blind the pilot ... putting all people aboard the aircraft at serious risk' CBC News Posted: Dec 07, 2017 7:15 AM MT Last Updated: Dec 07, 2017 7:15 AM MT A pilot bound for the Villeneuve Airport northwest of Edmonton was able to navigate a safe landing after a green laser was pointed at the plane Wednesday night. The aircraft was flying somewhere over Sturgeon County when the pilot realized someone was pointing a green laser at the plane, Morinville RCMP said in a statement. RCMP said it's extremely fortunate that no one was hurt. Laser strikes on an aircraft are extremely dangerous, police said. "The laser can temporarily blind the pilot, create intense glare that affects the pilot's vision and distract the pilot, putting all people aboard the aircraft at serious risk." RCMP were notified of the incident by Nav Canada, the private operator of Canada's civil air navigation service. Police did not provide any details on the plane, how many passengers were on board, or if the pilot required medical attention. 'It's a disturbing statistic' Last year, the federal government launched a social media campaign focused on the issue of people pointing lasers at planes. The number of laser incidents reported to Transport Canada has increased in the last few years: In 2014, there were 502 so-called laser strike incidents on planes, a 43-per-cent increase since 2012. According to Transport Canada, there were more than 500 reported laser strikes in 2016. "It's a disturbing statistic," RCMP said. "It means the safety of pilots, crew and passengers were put at risk 500 times that year. Pointing a laser at an aircraft is illegal and a criminal offence." The punishment for anyone caught shining a laser at an aircraft is a fine of up to $100,000, five years in prison, or both. RCMP are asking anyone with information on the incident to contact the Morinville detachment or Crime Stoppers. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/villeneuve-airport-edmonton-laser-plane-investigation-1.4437107

Partagé par les membres

  • Partager une nouvelle avec la communauté

    C'est très simple, il suffit de copier/coller le lien dans le champ ci-dessous.

Abonnez-vous à l'infolettre

pour ne manquer aucune nouvelle de l'industrie

Vous pourrez personnaliser vos abonnements dans le courriel de confirmation.