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  • Germany to equip new coastal patrol vessels with BAE Systems’ 57mm guns

    4 septembre 2019 | International, Naval

    Germany to equip new coastal patrol vessels with BAE Systems’ 57mm guns

    BAE Systems has been selected by the vessel contractor to provide the German federal police force, Bundespolizei, with three 57mm naval guns for its three new 86m Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs) built by Fassmer shipyard. BAE Systems has been selected by the vessel contractor to provide the German federal police force, Bundespolizei, with three 57mm naval guns for its three new 86m Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs) built by Fassmer shipyard. The gun systems, known as the Bofors 57 Mk3, will support the maritime arm of the Bundespolizei that monitors the country's North Sea and Baltic coastlines. The 57 Mk3 is a flexible, highly versatile gun system designed to react quickly for close-to-shore operations. “The Bofors 57 Mk3 is a versatile naval gun with firepower and range that exceeds expectations when compared with similar, medium calibre naval gun systems. That's how our 57 millimeter system has earned its reputation as the deck gun of choice for ships operating in coastal environments,” said Ulf Einefors, director of marketing and sales for BAE Systems' weapons business in Sweden. “This contract expands the number of European nations deploying the 57 Mk3 and reflects the growing interest we're seeing in the region, where we look forward to supporting new opportunities in the near future.” The 57 Mk3 naval gun is also in use with the allied navies and coast guards of eight nations, including Canada, Finland, Mexico, and Sweden, as well as the United States, where it is known as the Mk110 naval gun. This contract also includes accompanying fire control systems as well as systems integration support. Work is expected to begin immediately and will be performed at the BAE Systems facility in Karlskoga, Sweden. The first unit is scheduled for delivery in 2020. https://www.baesystems.com/en/article/germany-to-equip-new-coastal-patrol-vessels-with-bae-systems--57mm-guns

  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - August 30, 2019

    3 septembre 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - August 30, 2019

    ARMY Southwest Range Services LLC, Las Cruces, New Mexico, was awarded a $377,006,101 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for engineering and technical expertise for the operation, maintenance, research, development and other support of testing facilities, instrumentation, systems and equipment for test operations. Bids were solicited via the internet with six received. Work will be performed in White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 31, 2024. Fiscal 2010 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $377,006,101 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Mission and Installation Contracting Command, Fort Hood, Texas, is the contracting activity (W91151-19-C-0008). J.E. McAmis Inc.,* Chico, California, was awarded a $140,700,210 firm-fixed-price contract for construction activities related to rehabilitating the South Jetty located at the Mouth of the Columbia River. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Hammond, Oregon, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 29, 2025. Fiscal 2019 civil works; and operations and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $17,675,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland, Oregon, is the contracting activity (W9127N-19-C-0025). Raytheon Missile Systems, Tucson, Arizona, was awarded a $129,811,367 modification (PZ0017) to Foreign Military Sales (Oman and Taiwan) contract W31P4Q-17-C-0194 to procure missiles. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work will be performed in Tucson, Arizona, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 1, 2021. Fiscal 2010 procurement of weapons and tracked combat vehicles, Army funds in the amount of $129,811,367 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity. PAE Government Systems Inc., Arlington, Virginia, was awarded a $122,830,985 modification (P00013) to Foreign Military Sales (Afghanistan) contract W56HZV-17-C-0117 for ground vehicle support. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work will be performed in Kabul, Afghanistan, with an estimated completion date of March 1, 2020. Fiscal 2018 and 2019 Afghanistan Security Forces, Army funds in the amount of $122,830,985 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity. HydroGeoLogic Inc.,* Reston, Virginia (W912QR-19-D-0051); CTL Environmental LLC,* Novi, Michigan (W912QR-19-D-0052); PE Ayuda Joint Venture LLC,* St. Louis, Missouri (W912QR-19-D-0053); CAPE-Cabrera JV LLC,* Norcross, Georgia (W912QR-19-D-0054); ESI-ATC JV LLC,* Westland, Michigan (W912QR-19-D-0055); PIKA-Insight JV LLC,* Stafford, Texas (W912QR-19-D-0056); and EnSafe Inc.,* Memphis, Tennessee (W912QR-19-D-0057), will compete for each order of the $95,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for environmental restoration services. Bids were solicited via the internet with 20 received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 28, 2024. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville, Kentucky, is the contracting activity. Oshkosh Defense LLC, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, was awarded a $77,609,835 modification (P00251) to contract W56HZV-15-C-0095 for Joint Light Tactical Vehicle and installed kits. Work will be performed in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, with an estimated completion date of March 31, 2021. Fiscal 2018 and 2019 research, development, test and evaluation; defense procurement and other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $77,609,835 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity. California Department of Rehabilitation, Sacramento, California, was awarded a $56,473,292 firm-fixed-price contract for food services, dining facilities management functions, food receiving and storage, food preparation for grab-n-go services, food serving, facility sanitation and janitorial duties, logistics and management functions. Bids were solicited via the internet with six received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 29, 2024. U.S. Army Mission and Installation Contracting Command, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, is the contracting activity (W9124J-19-D-0016). Tiya Services LLC,* Baton Rouge, Louisiana, was awarded a $36,622,610 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for base operations support services acquisition. Bids were solicited via the internet with six received. Work will be performed in Fort Benning, Georgia, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 31, 2024. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $6,339,755 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Mission and Installation Contracting Command, Fort Benning, Georgia, is the contracting activity (W911SF-19-C-0024). International Business Machines Corp., Bethesda, Maryland, was awarded a $30,994,674 modification (P00061) to contract W52P1J-17-C-0008 for services and solutions necessary to support and maintain the Army's General Fund Enterprise Business System. Work will be performed in Bethesda, Maryland, with an estimated completion date of Jan. 15, 2020. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, Army funds were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, is the contracting activity. Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Co. LLC, Old Brook, Illinois, was awarded a $26,470,000 firm-fixed-price contract for Baltimore Harbor maintenance dredging. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Baltimore, Maryland, with an estimated completion date of March 30, 2020. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, Army; and cost share funds in the amount of $26,470,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore, Maryland, is the contracting activity (W912DR-19-C-0033). Heeter Geotechnical Construction LLC, Mount Morris, Pennsylvania, was awarded a $23,908,476 modification (P00004) to contract W912P5-18-C-0017 for Kentucky Lock Downstream Lock excavation construction. Work will be performed in Grand Rivers, Kentucky, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 5, 2021. Fiscal 2019 civil works funds in the amount of $23,908,476 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville, Tennessee, is the contracting activity. Herve Cody Contractor LLC,* Robbinsville, North Carolina, was awarded a $20,607,010 firm-fixed-price contract for reservoir and intake canal bank stabilization. Bids were solicited via the internet with three received. Work will be performed in Indiantown, Florida, with an estimated completion date of Nov. 9, 2020. Fiscal 2019 civil works funds in the amount of $20,607,010 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville, North Carolina, is the contracting activity (W912EP-19-C-0024). Tower Industries - Allied Mechanical Wisconsin,* Greenville, Wisconsin, was awarded an $18,473,434 firm-fixed-price contract for the Bomb Dummy Unit cast ductile iron practice bomb. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work will be performed in Greenville, Wisconsin, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 31, 2024. Fiscal 2017 and 2019 procurement of ammunition, Army funds in the amount of $18,473,434 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, is the contracting activity (W52P1J-19-C-0048). Intercontinental Construction Contracting Inc.,* Passaic, New Jersey, was awarded a $14,893,318 firm-fixed-price contract for excavation and installation of in-ground pre-placed crypts, construction of a maintenance building with restroom and storage. Bids were solicited via the internet with five received. Work will be performed in West Point, New York, with an estimated completion date of July 30, 2021. Fiscal 2019 military construction funds in the amount of $14,893,318 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York, New York, is the contracting activity (W912DS-19-C-0018). San Antonio Lighthouse for the Blind, San Antonio, was awarded a $13,303,000 firm-fixed-price contract to procure Integrated Head Protection System, retention system units for helmets. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 29, 2022. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity (W91CRB-19-D-0019). Alltech Engineering Corp.,* St. Paul, Minnesota, was awarded an $11,648,500 firm-fixed-price contract to rehabilitate the two spillway tainter gates at Raystown Dam to repair or replace the structural, mechanical, and electrical components in the tainter gate system. Bids were solicited via the internet with four received. Work will be performed in Hesston, Pennsylvania, with an estimated completion date of July 22, 2022. Fiscal 2018 civil works funds in the amount of $11,648,500 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore, Maryland, is the contracting activity (W912DR-19-C-0030). MISSILE DEFENSE AGENCY Lockheed Martin Rotary and Mission Systems, Moorestown, New Jersey, is being awarded a sole-source, cost-plus-incentive-fee and firm-fixed-price contract. The total value of this contract is $326,998,037. Under this follow on contract, the contractor will design, develop, integrate, test and certify the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) 6.0 capability. Aegis BMD 6.0 provides an increased BMD capability by incorporating the Air and Missile Defense Radar, now designated SPY-6, for introduction on the first DDG Flight III. The work will be performed in Moorestown, New Jersey, with an estimated completion date of December 2025. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $14,999,999 will be obligated at the time of award. The Missile Defense Agency, Dahlgren, Virginia, is the contracting activity (HQ0276-19-C-0001). NAVY Raytheon, Tucson, Arizona, is awarded $246,495,123 for an undefinitized contract action, performance-based logistics requirements contract for repair, upgrade, or replacement, required availability, required reliability, configuration management, inventory management and obsolescence management in support of the Close-In Weapon System, Land-based Phalanx Weapon System, Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) and SeaRAM. This contract includes a two-year base period with one three-year option, which if exercised, will bring the contract ceiling value to $466,395,931. Work will be performed in Louisville, Kentucky, and work is expected to be completed by August 2021; if the option is exercised, work will be completed by August 2024. Annual working capital funds (Navy) will be obligated as individual task orders are issued and funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. One firm was solicited for this non-competitive requirement under authority 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1) and Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1, with one offer received. Naval Supply Systems Command, Weapon Systems Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity (N00383-19-D-VP01). Progeny Systems Corp., Manassas, Virginia, is awarded a $115,736,303 cost-plus-incentive-fee, firm-fixed-price, cost and cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for an upgrade to the Mk 48 mod 7 Common Broadband Advanced Sonar System (CBASS) heavyweight torpedo program, to include the following deliverables for associated subsystem electronic systems: detail design, engineering development models, proof-of-design units, proof-of-manufacturing units, low-rate initial production units and factory test equipment. Also included in this procurement are related engineering and hardware repair services and provisioned-items orders. This contract includes options, which if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $186,567,981. Work will be performed in Manassas, Virginia (40%); Salt Lake City, Utah (18%); Middletown, Rhode Island (18%); Charleroi, Pennsylvania (17%); Cranston, Rhode Island (5%); and Annapolis, Maryland (2%), and is expected to be completed by February 2024. If all options are exercised, work will continue through August 2026. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funding in the amount of $5,790,000 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with three offers received. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity (N00024-19-C-6408). Design Partners Inc., Honolulu, Hawaii, is awarded a maximum amount $50,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity architect-engineering contract for architect-engineer services for various architectural projects under the cognizance of Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Hawaii. The work to be performed provides for architect-engineer services to include, but are not limited to, the execution and delivery of military construction project documentation; functional analysis and concept development workshops; design charrettes; design-build request for proposal solicitation documents; design-bid-build design contract documents; cost estimates; technical surveys and reports including concept studies; site engineering investigations and surveys; collateral equipment buy packages; comprehensive interior design, to include structural interior design; and furniture, fixtures, and equipment packages; and post construction award services. No task orders are being issued at this time. Work will be performed at various Navy, Marine Corp and other government facilities within the NAVFAC Hawaii area of responsibility. The term of the contract is not to exceed 60 months with an expected completion date of August 2024. Fiscal 2019 operation and maintenance (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $10,000 are obligated on this award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Future task orders will be primarily funded by military construction planning and design funds. This contract was competitively procured via the Navy Electronic Commerce Online website with five proposals received. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, is the contracting activity (N62478-19-D-5029). Kellogg Brown and Root Services Inc., Houston, Texas, is awarded a $27,721,832 modification of the first bridge under an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for base operations support services at Isa Air Base, Kingdom of Bahrain. The work to be performed provides for but is not limited to, all management, supervision, tools, materials, supplies, labor and transportation services necessary to perform galley services, bachelor quarters and laundry services, facility management, emergency service requests, urgent service, routing service, minor work I and II, facilities investment, custodial, pest control service, integrated solid waste, grounds maintenance, wastewater, operate reverse osmosis water treatment system and base support vehicles, environmental, fire emergency services and explosive safety officer services. After award of this bridge, the total cumulative contract value will be $175,403,361. Work will be performed at Isa Air Base, Kingdom of Bahrain. This bridge period is from September 2019 to May 2020. No funds will be obligated at time of award. Fiscal 2019 operation and maintenance (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $11,247,681 for non-recurring work will be obligated on individual task orders issued during the option period. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Europe Africa and Southwest Asia, Naples, Italy, is the contracting activity (N62470-14-D-6012). Al Larson Boat Shop Inc.,* San Pedro, California (N55236-15-D-0013); Epsilon Systems Solutions, Inc.,* San Diego, California (N55236-15-D-0014); Integrated Marine Services Inc.,* Chula Vista, California (N55236-15-D-0015); Marine Group Boat Works Inc.,* Chula Vista, California (N55236-15-D-0016); Miller Marine Inc.,* San Diego, California (N55236-15-D-0017); and Nielsen Beaumont Marine Inc.,* San Diego, California (N55236-15-D-0018), are each awarded contract modifications with a combined ceiling of $15,000,000 to exercise option year four to a previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, multiple award contracts to provide marine boatyard services and industrial support for boats and vessels greater than or equal to 15 meters or 50 feet in length. Work will be performed in San Diego, California, or contractor facilities on the West Coast and is expected to be completed by September 2020. No funding will be obligated at time of award. The Southwest Regional Maintenance Center, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity. San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) Co., a public utility company regulated by the California Public Utilities Commission, San Diego, California, is awarded $12,765,441 for firm-fixed-price task order N62473-19-F-5128 under the basic ordering agreement (BOA) N62473-18-G-5615 for energy conservation measures at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, San Diego, California. The work to be performed provides for energy conservation and resiliency measures that includes: repairing point to point redline radios; installing advanced metering infrastructure; installing supervisory control and data acquisition; replacing high bay high intensity diode, T5HO, and T8 lighting with light emitted diode (LED); replacing direct digital control equipment; replacing boilers; replacing base wide T8/T12, compact fluorescent, interior incandescent, halogen and exterior lighting fixtures with LED; perform constant commissioning and retrofit or replacement of heating and air conditioning units. Work will be performed in San Diego, California, and is expected to be completed by Oct. 30, 2020. No funds will be obligated at the time of award. This project will utilize third party financing through the utility company in the amount of $12,765,441. The energy conservation project will be amortized for a term of 13 years with an annual rate of 2.81%, and the payment will be included as a separate utility bill submitted annually based upon the amortization schedule for a grand total cost of $15,636,652. This task order falls under the terms and conditions of the BOA with SDG&E. The BOA allows for services without full and open competition pursuant to the statutory authorities of 10 U.S. Code (USC) 2304 and 10 USC 2913. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwest, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity (N62473-18-G-5615). Honeywell International Inc. Defense & Space, Tempe, Arizona, is awarded $11,465,688 for modification P00006 under a previously awarded performance-based logistics requirements contract (N00383-12-D-003D) for repair, replacement and program support for auxiliary power units used on F/A-18 A-G models, P-3, and C-2 aircrafts along with providing coverage for the main fuel controls and electronic control unit used on the F/A-18 and the P-3 engine driven compressor. This modification includes a four-month period of performance and will bring the total estimated value of the contract to approximately $260,000,000. Work will be performed in Jacksonville, Florida (50%); Cherry Point, North Carolina (39%); and various contractor facilities (11%). Work is expected to be completed by December 2019. Fiscal 2019 working capital funds (Navy) will be obligated as individual task orders are issued, and funds will not expire before the end of the current fiscal year. This contract includes support for the Australian F/A-18 Super Hornet under the Foreign Military Sales program, and represents less than one percent of the estimated contract value. One firm was solicited for this non-competitive requirement in accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1, and one offer was received. Naval Supply Systems Command Weapon Systems Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity. Peraton Inc., Herndon, Virginia, is awarded $11,374,305 for modification P00028 to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract (N00030-16-C-0016) to exercise various contract options for the continuation of support services including critical system assessment and vulnerability services and reentry systems development support services for the Trident II (D5). Work will be performed in Colorado Springs, Colorado (71.1%); Washington, District of Columbia (22.5%); Cape Canaveral, Florida (4.6%); and Albuquerque, New Mexico (1.8%). Work is expected to be completed Sept. 30, 2020. Subject to the availability of funding, fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance (Navy) funding in the amount of $6,108,026; and fiscal 2020 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funding in the amount of $5,266,279 will be obligated as a result of this award. The fiscal 2020 operation and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $6,108,026 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was awarded on a sole-source basis to Exelis Inc. (now Peraton Inc.) and previously synopsized on the Federal Business Opportunity website. Strategic Systems Programs, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. The Korte Co., St. Louis, Missouri, is awarded $10,470,093 for firm-fixed-price task order N69450-19-F-0720 under a previously awarded multiple award construction contract (N69450-19-D-0910) for renovation of Hangar 1338 at Naval Station Mayport, Florida. This task order is for a design-build construction project to renovate Hangar 1338 for the installation of two government installed training modules, Navigation, Seamanship and Shiphandling Trainer (NSST) 4.0 and NSST 5.0, and related equipment. NSST is a state-of-the-art naval ships bridge team trainer facility designed to replicate the environment found on the bridge of a Navy ship and utilize life-like scenarios with visual simulation to train Navy bridge teams. Work will be performed in Jacksonville, Florida, and is expected to be completed by March 2021. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $10,470,093 are obligated on this award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Three proposals were received for this task order. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, Jacksonville, Florida, is the contracting activity. Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Bethpage, New York, is awarded a $9,462,556 modification to previously awarded contract N00024-17-C-6311 to exercise an option for the production of Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) Surface-to-Surface Missile Module. The LCS are fast, agile and networked surface combatants, optimized for operating in the littorals through outfitting seaframes with mission-specific mission packages. The primary missions supported by mission packages are: anti-submarine warfare, mine countermeasures and surface warfare. Work will be performed in Huntsville, Alabama (80%); Bethpage, New York (18%); and Hollywood, Maryland (2%), and is expected to be complete by May 2021. Fiscal 2019 other procurement (Navy) funding in the amount of $8,445,109 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. IntraMicron Inc.,* Auburn, Alabama, is awarded a $9,377,828 cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, level-of-effort contract, for provision of engineering and technical services for the Energy and Conversion Research and Development Branch. Work will be performed in Auburn, Alabama, and is expected to be complete by August 2022. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funding in the total amount of $4,584,294 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. In accordance with 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(5), authorized or required by statute, this procurement was not competitively procured. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Philadelphia Division, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity (N64498-19-D-4025). Tekla Research Inc., Dumfries, Virginia, is awarded $8,972,221 for cost-plus-fixed-fee task order N00173-19-F-3001 under a previously awarded contract (N00178-14-D-7965) for research and development in electro-optical and infrared for advanced intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and electronic warfare prototypes. The total cumulative face value of this contract is $45,481,093. Work will be performed in Washington, District of Columbia. The period of performance is 60 months including a 12-month base period, and four 12-month option periods. Period of performance for the base period is Sept. 15, 2019 – Sept. 14, 2020. Working capital (Defense) funds in the amount of $1,557,000 will be obligated at the time of award. Funds will not expire at the end of the current year. This task order was procured using competitive procedures as a 100 percent small business set-aside via SeaPort-e under a request for proposal #N00173-19-R-3000. The Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. CAPE Environmental Management Inc.,* Honolulu, Hawaii, is awarded $7,771,456 for firm-fixed-price task order N63473-19-F-5014 under a small business remedial action contract for a non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA) at installation restoration (IR) site 19 Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Miramar, California. The work to be performed is for the contractor to develop an amendment to the 2014 action memorandum based on engineering evaluation/cost analysis alternatives for IR Site 19 NTCRA, and implement the actions in the amendment: excavation, surface vacuuming and erosion control at MCAS Miramar, San Diego. Due to ongoing movement of contaminated sediment/soils and lead overshot from Site 19, the Navy requires an interim solution that will stabilize and remove contaminated sediments and soils surrounding the range. The task order also contains four unexercised options, which if exercised would increase the cumulative task order value to $13,863,610. Work will be performed in San Diego, California, and is expected to be completed by August 2022. Fiscal 2019 operation and maintenance (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $7,771,456 are obligated on this award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. One proposal was received for this task order. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwest, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity (N62742-16-D-1807). AIR FORCE The Boeing Co., Layton, Utah, has been awarded a $122,910,723 firm fixed price contract, for the intercontinental ballistic missile cryptography upgrade increment II (ICU II) production. This contract definitizes an undefinitized contract action (UCA) issued Oct. 29, 2018, and provides the government 75 A-4 drawers and 8 digital components, with the option to procure 431 additional A-4 drawers. Work will be performed at Huntsville, Alabama; Huntington Beach, California; and Layton, Utah, and is expected to be completed by Feb. 28, 2022. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2017 missile procurement funds in the amount of $5,762,283; fiscal 2018 missile procurement funds in the amount of $23,590,855; and fiscal 2019 missile procurement funds in the amount of $5,705,951 were obligated on the UCA; fiscal 2018 missile procurement funds in the amount of 2,535,700; and fiscal 2019 missile procurement funds in the amount of $45,144,887 are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center, Hill Air Force Base, Utah, is the contracting activity (FA8204-19-C-0001-PZ0008). General Dynamics Information Technology Inc., Fairfax, Virginia, has been awarded a $30,837,185 face value cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for bioeffects research of directed energy effects. This contract provides for research on directed energy systems to assist in transitioning Department of Defense technologies. Work will be performed at Joint Base San Antonio, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and is expected to be complete by Nov. 28, 2025. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and three offers were received. Fiscal 2019 research and development funds in the amount of $250,000 will be obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Research Lab, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8650-19-C-6055). M1 Support Services, Denton, Texas, has been awarded a $24,666,741 contract modification (P00037) to previously awarded contract FA4890-16-C-0012 for T-38 Sustainment Services. The modification will provide intermediate and organizational maintenance of T-38 aircraft for Air Combat Command, Air Force Materiel Command and Air Force Global Strike Command. Total cumulative face value of the contract is $24,666,741. Work will be performed at multiple U.S. Air Force bases and is expected to be completed by Sept. 30, 2020. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance funds are being obligated at the time of award and no funds will be obligated at the time of the award. The Air Combat Command - Acquisition Management and Integration Center, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia, is the contracting activity. Rockwell Collins Inc., Collins Aerospace, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, has been awarded a $15,400,000 modification (P00006) firm-fixed price to contract FA8102-16-D-0005 for services and supplies in support of modernization, expansion and depot-level contractor logistics support. This contract will provide support for Scope Command's High Frequency Global Communications System in support of Air Force, Navy and Coast Guard requirements. Work will be performed in Richardson, Texas, in support of this Aug. 31, 2019, through Aug. 30, 2020, ordering period. This option three of the contract is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Total estimated contract value as of option award is $56,000,000. No funds are being obligated at the time of the award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, is the contracting activity. Ensco Inc., Springfield, Virginia, has been awarded a $14,300,000 firm-fixed-price modification (P00060) to previously awarded contract FA8807-17-C-0001 for providing off base contractor accommodations for the RN Systems Engineering and Integration (SE&I) Support contract. When the contract was initially awarded, the government had office space available for the contractor; however, the government is not able to provide office space to the contractor for performance on Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, any longer and needs the contractor to secure off base accommodations to continue performance on the SE&I contract. Work will be performed at Colorado Springs, Colorado, and is expected to be completed by Oct. 31, 2022. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $637,244 are being obligated at the time of award. The Space and Missile Center, Sustainment Directorate, Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, is the contracting activity. IF Armor International LLC, doing business as Man Lift, Warner Robins, Georgia, was awarded a $10,856,307 firm-fixed-price contract for the purchase of explosion proof articulating boom lifts. This contract provides for the purchase of commercial, 45-, 60- and 80-foot lifts modified to meet explosion proof articulating boom lifts specifications. Work will be performed in Shelby, North Carolina, with an ordering period of two years. This award is the result of a competition acquisition with three offers received. Fiscal 2019 depot maintenance activity group capital investment program funds are being used and no funds were obligated at time of award. The Air Force Sustainment Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA8571-19-D-A004). DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY Booz Allen Hamilton, McLean, Virginia, has been awarded a time and materials contract (HHM402-19-C-0058) with a ceiling of $89,993,973 to provide support services for the Defense Intelligence Agency's (DIA) Directorate of Analysis. Through this award, DIA will procure services for the production, dissemination and tracking of DIA's finished intelligence products, including the development and maintenance of applications and tools used to perform the mission. Work will be performed in the National Capital Region with an expected completion date of Feb. 28, 2025. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $10,780,907; and research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $586,012 are being obligated at time of award. This contract has been awarded through a competitive acquisition and two offers were received. The Virginia Contracting Activity, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. *Small Business https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Contracts/Contract/Article/1949291/source/GovDelivery/

  • Airbus se retire de la course pour remplacer les CF-18 canadiens

    3 septembre 2019 | Local, Aérospatial

    Airbus se retire de la course pour remplacer les CF-18 canadiens

    Par LEE BERTHIAUME La division Airbus Defence and Space, en partenariat avec le gouvernement britannique, était l'une des quatre entreprises qui devaient selon toute vraisemblance soumissionner pour ce contrat de 19 milliards portant sur la construction des 88 nouveaux avions de chasse qui doivent remplacer les CF-18 vieillissants de l'Aviation royale canadienne. Mais dans un communiqué publié vendredi, Airbus annonce qu'elle a informé le gouvernement canadien de sa décision de retirer de la course son « Eurofighter Typhoon » pour deux motifs — déjà évoqués par ailleurs avant même le lancement officiel de l'appel d'offres en juillet. Le premier motif concerne l'obligation pour les soumissionnaires de préciser comment ils comptent s'assurer que leurs avions pourront s'intégrer au réseau canado-américain ultra-secret de renseignement, connu sous le nom de « Two Eyes », qui est utilisé pour coordonner la défense commune de l'Amérique du Nord. Airbus conclut que cette exigence fait peser « un coût trop lourd » sur les avions qui ne sont pas américains. Le géant européen explique qu'il aurait été tenu de démontrer comment il envisageait d'intégrer son Typhoon au système « Two-Eyes » sans même connaître les détails techniques de ce système ultra-secret de renseignement. Le deuxième facteur a été la décision du gouvernement libéral de modifier la politique qui obligeait traditionnellement les soumissionnaires à s'engager légalement à investir autant d'argent dans des produits et activités au Canada que ce qu'ils tirent des contrats militaires décrochés. En vertu du nouveau mécanisme, les soumissionnaires peuvent plutôt établir des « objectifs industriels » et signer des accords non contraignants promettant de tout mettre en œuvre pour les atteindre. Ces soumissionnaires perdent des points dans l'appel d'offres, mais ils ne sont plus écartés d'emblée de la course. Les États-Unis soutenaient que la politique précédente violait un accord signé par le Canada en 2006 pour devenir l'un des neuf pays partenaires dans le développement du F-35 de Lockheed Martin. Or, cet accord prévoit que les entreprises des pays partenaires se feront toutes concurrence pour obtenir des contrats en sous-traitance. Deuxième retrait Dans son annonce, vendredi, Airbus soutient que la nouvelle approche ne valorise pas suffisamment les engagements contraignants qu'elle était prête à offrir et qui constituaient l'un de ses principaux arguments. La ministre des Services publics et de l'Approvisionnement, Carla Qualtrough, a défendu à nouveau l'approche de son gouvernement dans ce dossier. Dans une déclaration écrite publiée après l'annonce du retrait d'Airbus, elle a estimé que cette nouvelle approche « assurera une participation maximale des fournisseurs ». « Notre gouvernement priorise les retombées économiques solides dans ce projet, a soutenu Mme Qualtrough. Nous sommes convaincus que cet investissement soutiendra la croissance de la main-d'œuvre canadienne hautement qualifiée dans les industries de l'aérospatiale et de la défense pour les décennies à venir et créera d'importantes retombées économiques et industrielles dans l'ensemble du pays. » Airbus devient la deuxième entreprise à retirer son chasseur de l'appel d'offres canadien, après le retrait du « Rafale » de la société française Dassault en novembre dernier. Il ne reste plus maintenant comme prétendants que le « F-35 » de Lockheed Martin, le « Super Hornet » de son concurrent américain Boeing et le « Gripen » du suédois Saab. Boeing et Saab ont déjà exprimé leurs préoccupations au sujet de la nouvelle politique en matière d'exigences industrielles, affirmant que ces changements ne profiteront pas aux contribuables et à l'industrie canadienne de l'aérospatiale et de la défense. Les entreprises devraient soumettre leurs offres l'hiver prochain et le contrat final doit être signé en 2022 ; le premier avion ne sera pas livré avant au moins 2025. Les gouvernements fédéraux successifs s'emploient à remplacer les CF-18 depuis plus de dix ans. Selon le porte-parole conservateur en matière de défense, James Bezan, le retrait d'Airbus prouve que le gouvernement libéral a mal géré tout ce dossier pendant son mandat — notamment en attendant quatre ans avant de lancer l'appel d'offres promis en campagne électorale en 2015. « Alors que d'autres pays ont choisi des avions de combat en moins de deux ans, le bilan du premier ministre Justin Trudeau en matière d'achats militaires en est un de retards et d'échecs », a estimé M. Bezan. Le gouvernement conservateur précédent avait annoncé en 2010 un plan pour acheter des F-35 de Lockheed Martin sans appel d'offres, mais il y a renoncé deux ans plus tard à la suite de préoccupations concernant les coûts et les capacités de ce chasseur furtif. https://www.lapresse.ca/affaires/entreprises/201908/30/01-5239279-airbus-se-retire-de-la-course-pour-remplacer-les-cf-18-canadiens.php

  • DoD ‘Office’ Functions Move To Cloud In Multi-Billion-Dollar Contract

    3 septembre 2019 | International, C4ISR

    DoD ‘Office’ Functions Move To Cloud In Multi-Billion-Dollar Contract

    By BARRY ROSENBERG WASHINGTON: Overshadowed by the dispute with DoD's planned single-award JEDI cloud contract is another multi-billion-dollar single-award cloud contract awarded today that will actually determine the software that military personnel and civil servants use every day. Under the $7.6 billion 10-year Defense Enterprise Office Solutions (DEOS) cloud contract, the Pentagon will use Microsoft productivity tools such as word processing, spreadsheets, email, collaboration, file sharing, and storage — Office 365. Those applications presently reside mostly on legacy desktop computers, and will transition to a cloud-based solution across all military services. The result should be improved cybersecurity, for one thing. “The notion is that if you have it professionally and centrally managed it should be better patched and configured than having hundreds of individually managed servers,” said David Mihelcic, former chief technology officer at the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) and now a consultant with DMMI. “This seems reasonable, but I don't think there is any cyber magic in DEOS either.” The joint General Services Administration/Defense Department DEOS blanket purchase agreement was awarded to CSRA (acquired by General Dynamics in April 2018 for $9.7 billion) and its subcontractors Dell Marketing (a wholesale distributor of computers, peripherals, and software) and Minburn Technology (a value added reseller that specializes in Microsoft enterprise software agreements). The award includes a five-year base period with two two-year options and one one-year option. “DOD's cloud strategy includes both general purpose and fit-for-purpose clouds (and) DEOS is a great example of a fit-for-purpose cloud that supports our multi-cloud strategy,” said DOD Chief Information Officer Dana Deasy in a statement. “DEOS will streamline our use of cloud email and collaborative tools while enhancing cybersecurity and information sharing based on standardized needs and market offerings. “The journey to the cloud has been, and will continue to be, an iterative learning process. All lessons learned from pilot programs and the department's early cloud adopters have been rolled into this solution. DEOS takes advantage of technical, security and contractual lessons from these ongoing pilots, while military services are leveraging them to assess the readiness of their infrastructure to support migration to DEOS.” DEOS includes voice, video, and text collaboration capabilities, which the DoD already has with capabilities under enterprise services like: Defense Collaboration Services (DCS), which provides secure web conferencing and instant messaging services on the Non-secure Internet Protocol Router Network (NIPRNet) and Secure Internet Protocol Routing Network (SIPRNet), and Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) chat. “Will it be an improvement over the current capabilities? I guess we will see,” said Mihalcic. “I can't say I found the collaborative capabilities of O365 better than what we had in DoD.” While DEOS on the surface appears to provide a back-office function, it can also be considered a weapon system given that it will provide common enterprise applications at local base, post, camp, and station levels — including deployed and afloat organizations — over the sensitive but unclassified NIPRNet and the secret SIPRNet, to include operations in Denied, Disconnected, Intermittent, and Limited Bandwidth (D-DIL) environments. “I would say almost certainly (DEOS is a warfighting capability), especially the SIPR instance,” said Mihelcic. “DoD uses email, chat, and DCS collaboration in support of warfighting today and this will now take on those needs. “As for DIL environments, DISA had threshold requirements for deployable instances in the draft RFP. The vendor most likely will satisfy with existing MS Exchange and Sharepoint software on deployable servers. To be honest, I think that most tactical units, including deployed Marines and Navy afloat, will stick with what they have.” https://breakingdefense.com/2019/08/dod-office-functions-move-to-cloud-in-multi-billion-dollar-contract/

  • What’s changing in the cyber domain? We ask industry experts

    3 septembre 2019 | International, Sécurité

    What’s changing in the cyber domain? We ask industry experts

    By: Andrew Eversden “What are you talking about now in cybersecurity that you weren't talking about six months ago?” Fifth Domain posed this question to cybersecurity experts at Black Hat, a cybersecurity conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, that ran from Aug. 3-8. With the cyber domain rapidly evolving, we wanted to know how conversations within the cyber community are changing. Some pointed to a new focus on utility systems and web-connected devices that sit on critical infrastructure. “It's only a matter of time until there's another major disruption in an electric utility somewhere in the world, probably not in the U.S., but elsewhere,” Sergio Caltagirone, threat intelligence director at Dragos, said at the conference Aug. 5. “But oil and gas has the higher likelihood of a major destructive and loss-of-life event. And I think most people did not realize how close to that we actually were.” Caltagirone was referring to the TRISIS event, malware that struck industrial control systems at a Saudi Arabian petrochemical plant and could've caused physical harm. He said that in the aftermath of that attack, threat researchers diving into the details realized just how bad it could've been. “We started finding a lot of stuff which hadn't been found before,” Caltagirone said. “Which made us realize very quickly how close that space is to a major event.” Dave Weinstein, chief security officer at Claroty, pointed to an “explosion” of devices connected to the internet of things.. “It's really a product of this general consensus among industrial organizations that the benefits exceed the costs in terms of embracing this type of digital transformation," Weinstein said Aug. 8, adding that organizations must be “mindful” of these devices and have a plan to mitigate their potential vulnerabilities. Brian Costello, a senior vice president at Flashpoint, told Fifth Domain on Aug. 8 that he is more often than before focusing on targeted cyberattacks from bad actors. That's a shift away from “campaign-based” attacks that tracked. There's “more planning out, more scoping out of targets and taking long-term planning to go after [a] particular target with a specific asset in mind,” Costello said. Along that same vein, Julian Zottl, a senior cyber architect at Raytheon, said he's noticing more inclusion of all-source intelligence in threat analysis. “We're looking at ... all the sources and trying to figure out indicators,” Zottl said Aug. 7. “[We're] even trying to do predictive analytics now, where it's like, ‘Oh, we see this threat might be coming.' I think that's something that we're starting to talk about more and more.” Several cybersecurity professionals interviewed by Fifth Domain said the U.S. government is moving away from the classic cyber kill chain and over to the MITRE ATT&CK framework, which dives deeper into potential threats to information security. “They used to think the hackers would just come in to steal secrets, conduct espionage and then leave,” said Tom Kellermann, chief cybersecurity officer at Carbon Black and a former commissioner on the Commission on Cyber Security for then-President Barack Obama. “In fact, they're maintaining persistence in these systems. They're manipulating the integrity of data and then they're using federal government agencies themselves and personnel's devices themselves to target anyone who implicitly trusts that person, that agency, that department.” he told Fifth Domain on Aug. 6. Chris Kennedy, chief information security officer at AttackIQ and a former official with the Treasury Department and the Marine Corps, said these new frameworks in use along with federal continuous monitoring programs allow for more attacker emulation, essentially simulating the attack agencies could face. “Agencies are starting to realize the value of attacker emulation as a way to measure and benchmark the effectiveness of their security controls,” Kennedy said on Aug. 7. And with government agencies in different stages of cloud migration, agencies will need to learn how that fits into their cybersecurity posture. Marten Mickos, CEO of white hat hacking company HackerOne, said this a new discussion. He also said the conversation surrounding the use of ethical hackers in government environments has evolved: The word “hacker” is becoming more accepted. “I do think it signals a shift in mindset," Michos said. There's a realization that "those people who portray themselves as hackers are actually those who will rescue us, not those who will destroy us.” Despite all the changing technology and evolving threats, one aspect of cybersecurity remains set in stone, said M. K. Palmore, a field chief security officer for the Americas at Palo Alto Networks and a recently retired FBI cyber agent. “It's about adhering to cybersecurity fundamentals,” Palmore said. “That message hasn't changed regardless of my position or where I'm located.” https://www.fifthdomain.com/show-reporters/black-hat/2019/08/30/whats-changing-in-the-cyber-domain-we-ask-industry-experts

  • Here’s who will build and integrate the first hypersonic weapon system prototype

    3 septembre 2019 | International, Terrestre

    Here’s who will build and integrate the first hypersonic weapon system prototype

    By: Jen Judson WASHINGTON — Dynetics Technical Solutions will be the first to manufacture a set of hypersonic glide body prototypes while Lockheed Martin will serve as the weapon system integrator, according to a U.S. Army announcement. The other transaction authority, or OTA, contract awards mark an important step forward in getting a prototype of the Army's Long Range Hypersonic Weapon, or LRHW — capable of flying at five times the speed of sound — that will launch from a mobile ground platform fielded by fiscal 2023. An OTA is a congressionally mandated contracting mechanism that makes it easier to prototype capabilities. The Army's No. 1 modernization priority is Long-Range Precision Fires, and hypersonic development falls into that category. “Delivering hypersonics to a unit of action will provide a critical combat capability for the Army in support of the National Defense Strategy,” Lt. Gen. L. Neil Thurgood, director of hypersonics, directed energy, space and rapid acquisition, said in an Aug. 30 statement. “With a collaborative effort by our partners in industry and the Department of Defense, we will advance this strategic weapon system and fulfill a critical mission for our nation.” Dynetics, based in Huntsville, Alabama, will get $351.6 million to produce the “first commercially manufactured set of prototype Common-Hypersonic Glide Body (C-HGB) systems,” according to the statement. This means the company will get the first crack at building the C-HGB, but it is likely others will subsequently receive awards to learn how to manufacture the C-HGB developed by the federally funded Sandia National Laboratories in an effort to build up the currently nonexistent hypersonic industrial base in the United States. Dynetics and future award winners will work with the lab to learn how to build the C-HGB. As hypersonic missiles become a reality, industry must relearn how to effectively, efficiently and economically produce them. While companies have developed warheads, glide bodies and other components, there is no industrial base equipped to manufacture hypersonic weapons. By giving multiple companies a chance to learn how to build the glide body, the hope is the process will build that vital industrial base. Lockheed Martin will integrate a launcher that can accommodate the C-HGB onto a mobile truck. That contract is worth $347 million. The OTA awards cover the design, integration and production work that will bring about a series of flight tests starting in 2020, which will lead to a fielding of a prototype LRHW battery, consisting of four trucks, launchers, hypersonic missile rounds and a command and control system. The Army is in charge of producing the LRHW C-HGB as part of a collaboration with the other services. "Dynetics has been developing enabling technologies for many years,” Steve Cook, the company's president, said in a statement. “Our team is pleased the Army saw that our highly-skilled engineers and technicians can bring this technology rapidly and affordably to the warfighter.” DTS will lead “a world-class team for the project, including established and proven defense industry contractors” like General Atomics Electromagnetic Systems, Lockheed Martin and Raytheon. “Each of these companies will bring decades of experience and will join science and technological capabilities to make a modern prototype and eventually become a program of record,” Cook said. General Atomics Electromagnetic Systems will provide cable, electrical and mechanical manufacturing. Lockheed will support the manufacturing, assembly, integration, testing, systems engineering and analysis. And as a principal subcontractor, Raytheon will provide its “extensive experience” in advanced hypersonic technology to build control, actuation and power-conditioning sub-assemblies that control flight, and it will help assemble and test the prototype. Lockheed Martin's integration team also includes Dynetics, which will develop launchers with hydraulics, outriggers, power generation and distribution for the ground platform. Other members of Lockheed's team are Integration Innovation Inc., Verity Integrated Systems, Martinez & Turek, and Penta Research. “We believe our relationships offer the Army unmatched expertise and puts us in the best position to deliver this critical capability to the nation," Eric Scherff, vice president for hypersonic strike programs for Lockheed Martin Space, said in a statement. Lockheed Martin's hypersonic strike contract awards already exceed $2.5 billion. The Army plans to deliver a hypersonic missile and launcher to a unit in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2021. The unit will train for an entire year without live rounds, Thurgood said earlier this month at the Space and Missile Defense Symposium in Huntsville, Alabama. He noted that the canisters the unit will use will be filled with cement to match the weight. The first live-round test will take place in FY22 and will be conducted by a battery led by a captain. https://www.defensenews.com/land/2019/08/30/heres-who-will-build-and-integrate-the-first-hypersonic-weapon-system-prototype

  • Here’s what Japan’s Defense Ministry wants to do with $50.5 billion

    3 septembre 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Here’s what Japan’s Defense Ministry wants to do with $50.5 billion

    By: Mike Yeo MELBOURNE, Australia — Japan's Defense Ministry has requested a budget of $50.5 billion for its next fiscal year, an increase of 1.2 percent over the previous year and the eighth straight year of an increase. The funds will be used to acquire more Lockheed Martin F-35 fighter jets, including Japan's first short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing F-35B, as well as increasing its Boeing KC-46A Pegasus tanker fleet to six aircraft. The bulk of the budget request is for costs associated with U.S. military forces stationed in Japan, with $1.9 billion requested to pay the salaries of Japanese citizens employed by the U.S military, supporting training exercises, and performing maintenance on and improvements to U.S. military facilities. The ministry's request includes $1.08 billion for F-35s, which is made up of $291.3 million for three conventional takeoff and landing F-35As and $795.3m for six F-35Bs. These will be Japan's first F-35Bs, and it's expected the country will eventually order 42 "B" models, of which 18 will be acquired over the next five years, according to Japan's Mid-Term Defense Plan released late last year. It also has plans to eventually operate 105 F-35As. The F-35Bs are to be operated from two Izumo-class helicopter destroyers. Japan announced last year plans to convert both ships, which are currently designed to operate helicopters, to be able to handle F-35Bs. Notably, the budget request asks for $29.1 million for “partial refurbishment” to enable F-35B operations. According to other reports, modifications for the ships include improvements to the heat resistance of their flight decks as well as the installation of additional lighting for aircraft operations. Japanese Defense Minister Takeshi Iwaya added that F-35B deck trials could be conducted with U.S. Marine Corps F-35Bs based in Japan following the modification work. Beyond the jets The budget request also asks for $1.05 billion for four more Boeing KC-46A Pegasus tanker aircraft, and $284.8 million for more Raytheon SM-3 Block IIA ballistic missile interceptors. The request for funding for four KC-46As is a departure from normal procedure, Previously, Japan ordered one tanker each during the 2017 and 2018 fiscal years. According to the ministry, the batch order is a more cost-effective means of acquisition, resulting in $100 million worth of savings. Given that Japan already awarded contracts to Boeing for two of the three KC-46As previously on order, the budget request for four more tankers suggests the ministry wants funding for the last aircraft and and for an additional order of three KC-46s. Defense News has sought clarification from Japan's Defense Ministry over whether this is the case. The budget request also includes a number of acquisitions from Japan's defense industry, with $654.3 million for another Soryu-class diesel-electric attack submarine. And should the budget pass, Kawasaki Heavy Industries will be able to keep its aircraft production lines open, with the ministry seeking funds to acquire three more P-1 anti-submarine aircraft and six C-2 airlifters at $213.4 million and $599 million respectively. The ministry also wants money for more equipment destined for Japan's land forces: 33 Type 16 wheeled maneuver combat vehicles and seven Type 19 wheeled self-propelled howitzers. The Type 19 is a newly developed eight-wheel drive howitzer sporting a 155mm weapon mounted on the German MAN HX military truck chassis, and it's earmarked to replace the towed FH70 howitzer currently in service with the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force. The Defense Ministry also wants to continue funding the development of indigenous electronic warfare capabilities. Japan's next fiscal year begins April 1, 2020. The budget request is not necessarily the actual amount that will be allocated by the Finance Ministry. https://www.defensenews.com/global/asia-pacific/2019/08/30/heres-what-japans-defense-ministry-wants-to-do-with-505-billion

  • In first, MDA remotely launches a missile

    3 septembre 2019 | International, Terrestre

    In first, MDA remotely launches a missile

    By: Jen Judson WASHINGTON — The first-ever test of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense system'sability to remotely fire an interceptor was deemed a success by the U.S. Missile Defense Agency. Following the test in the early hours of Aug. 30, the Lockheed Martin-made THAAD has now had 16 successful intercept tests in a row. But the significant milestone is proving the ability to remotely engage the system with a government-developed remote launcher kit. The capability provides extended range of a defended area, an MDA statement notes. “Preliminary indications are that planned flight test objectives were achieved and the target was successfully intercepted by the THAAD weapon system,” the statement reads. "This test demonstrates the expanding capabilities of the THAAD weapon system and its ability to intercept and destroy ballistic missile threats in defense of our nation, deployed forces and allies,” MDA Director Vice Adm. Jon Hill said in the statement. THAAD operators from the E-62 Battery conducted radar operations as well as launcher and fire control operations employing a procedure used in combat and were unaware of the target-launch timing. The ability to launch an interceptor remotely achieves a more layered — and ultimately less stove-piped — approach to regional ballistic missile defense and to increase the battlespace. The U.S. Army is also working to integrate the Patriot medium-range air-and-missile defense system with THAAD in response to an urgent operational need on the Korean Peninsula. That effort uses some of the same principles of decoupling launchers and radars so an operator can, for instance, use a THAAD radar (which can see farther than a Raytheon-made Patriot radar) but decide to engage a Patriot interceptor depending on the threat picture. The ability to use the THAAD radar also gets more out of the Patriot Advanced Capability-3 Missile Segment Enhancement (PAC-3 MSE) missile fired from Patriot units, which outperforms the organic Patriot radar. Earlier, in an Aug. 29 Army test also at White Sands Missile Range, a PAC-3 Cost Reduction Initiative interceptor took out an air-breathing threat “at a record distance," according to a Lockheed Martin statement. The company builds the missile as well as the PAC-3 MSE. The test also showed it can be integrated into the Northrop Grumman-made Integrated Air and Missile Defense Battle Command System, the command-and-control system of the Army's future air and missile defense architecture. The test demonstrated the Northrop system's ability to detect, track and engage a low-flying threat at a distance that exceeds the range of the current Patriot system, according to a Northrop Grumman statement. https://www.defensenews.com/land/2019/08/30/first-remotely-launched-terminal-missile-defense-test-deemed-a-success

  • These Tactical Glasses Could Give Marine Grunts an F-35 Pilot's View of the Battlefield

    3 septembre 2019 | International, Naval

    These Tactical Glasses Could Give Marine Grunts an F-35 Pilot's View of the Battlefield

    By Matthew Cox Marine infantrymen may soon be able to see through the floor of an MV-22 Osprey and track terrain features as they approach their attack objective. It sounds like science fiction, but Marine Lt. Col. Rory Quinn of the Pentagon's Close Combat Lethality Task Force says it could become reality if the Marine Corps decides to field the Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS), a sophisticated Microsoft technology that the Army is developing to give soldiers a new level of situational awareness in combat. In October, the Army will hold its second round of soldier evaluations, known as Soldier Touch Points, on what will eventually consist of a special set of tactical glasses that will display a soldier's weapon sight reticle and other key tactical information they will take into battle. Army officials say IVAS will be ready for initial fielding in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2021. Quinn said he sees IVAS as key to transforming Marine and Army infantry into a fifth-generation fighting force similar to the way fighter aircraft such as the F-35 Lighting II have evolved into fifth-gen technology. "Effectively, we have a third-generation infantry," Quinn told an audience Tuesday at the iFest 2019 symposium, put on by the National Defense Industrial Association. The lethality task force was stood up in 2018 by then-Defense Secretary Jim Mattis with the goal of resourcing the U.S. military's close-combat forces to become far more deadly than they are today. "In the MV-22, the windows are [not that big] so if I am lucky, I am next to one and ... I can see ... the river path and I can see that we went on this side of the river, so that confirmed that we went in the right direction," Quinn said. "But the F-35 pilot has cameras on the outside of the airplane and looks through the floor of the airplane. ... He can look through the wing and see someone who is down low at six o'clock on his right flank. "IVAS is coming, and it's going to create an F-35 [technology] for grunts, so I will simply look through the skin of the aircraft and see that I have turned 180 degrees out. I otherwise wouldn't be able to see that, and it creates chaos," he added. The Marine Corps has not committed to IVAS, but officials at Marine Corps Combat Development Command, Combat Development and Integration, "are watching the [Soldier Touch Points] and watching to see how the results occur versus what the metrics had to be" on the system, Quinn said. Roughly 50 Marines participated in the first Soldier Touch Point and the same number of Marines will likely be involved with the second evaluation in October, he said. "The Marines often follow and trace the Army -- let the Army do the research and development," Quinn said. The Army awarded a $480 million contract to Microsoft in late 2018 to develop its HoloLens technology into IVAS. The system is also being designed to provide soldiers with a synthetic training environment that will feature enemy avatars capable of learning soldier tactics so training scenarios are never the same, Army officials say. https://www.military.com/daily-news/2019/08/30/these-tactical-glasses-could-give-marine-grunts-f-35-pilots-view-battlefield.html

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