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  • The Pentagon wants to create a broader network of innovators

    14 mai 2019 | International, Aérospatial, C4ISR, Sécurité, Autre défense

    The Pentagon wants to create a broader network of innovators

    By: Mike Gruss The Pentagon is reorganizing its internal offices to better partner with universities and upstart technology firms to ensure the military has access to talent and research in the near future and to fortify its innovation pipeline. Defense leaders are increasingly worried about what they describe as the national security innovation base. They hope a series of steps will make it easier to work with, and take advantage of, the leading-edge science across the country. This includes technology that spans from the concept stage to the production stage, and outlets that includes researchers to the defense industrial base. The changes, which affect the Defense Innovation Unit and MD5, were first mentioned in the Pentagon's budget request for fiscal 2020 and have been discussed with increasing details in recent weeks. Defense innovation leaders explained the new setup to C4ISRNET in an interview May 9. DIU's mission is to help the military accelerate its use of emerging commercial technologies and lower the barrier of entry for businesses that don't already do business with the Pentagon. Under the new approach: - The MD5 National Security Technology Accelerator has been renamed the National Security Innovation Network. The network, which helps connect academia, DOD laboratories and users, will fall under the Defense Innovation Unit as a way to take advantage of economies of scale. Morgan Plummer, the network's managing director, said the new name, which changed May 6, more accurately portrays the agency's mission. The program has its own line in the budget for the first time in fiscal 2020. - The National Security Innovation Capital fund, a new program created in the fiscal 2019 defense policy bill, will set aside investment in upstart U.S. companies so they don't fall risk to foreign investors. U.S. leaders fear that as some startups become so desperate for funding they may not consider the national security ramifications of accepting money from overseas. “It's an attempt to keep hardware investment on shore,” said Mike Madsen, director of Washington operations at DIU. The NSIC also aims to signal to the investment community that the Defense Department is interested in developing dual-use technologies and to provide a foreign investment alternative for hardware companies. In testimony to Congress in March, Mike Griffin, the Pentagon's acquisition chief for research and engineering, said that the new groups will fall to DIU “in an effort to put similarly-focused organizations under a single leadership structure.” Perhaps more importantly, Defense leaders said the new structure will help the Pentagon “hand off” technology with a low readiness level or level of maturity until it is ready for broader adoption. “There are these huge pools of untapped talent,” Plummer said. To take advantage of that talent means going beyond research grants in academia and instead to create a network of hubs and spokes of early stage ventures in approximately 35 communities throughout the country. While DIU has offices in Austin, Boston and Silicon Valley, creating a broader network means the NSIN would have staffers in cities such as Chicago, Miami, Columbus, Boulder, Raleigh, St. Louis and Minneapolis. “It makes the Department accessible in a real way,” Plummer said. Previously, business leaders may see the Pentagon as a “big gray monolith” and “may not even know where the door to this place is.” DIU will continue to focus on artificial intelligence, autonomy, cyber, human systems, and space. The Pentagon asked for $164 million for DIU in its fiscal 2020 budget request. https://www.c4isrnet.com/pentagon/2019/05/13/the-pentagon-wants-to-create-a-broader-network-of-innovators/

  • Turkish company reveals plans to develop a supersonic drone

    14 mai 2019 | International, Aérospatial

    Turkish company reveals plans to develop a supersonic drone

    By: Burak Ege Bekdil ANKARA, Turkey — Turkey's state-controlled aerospace powerhouse, Turkish Aerospace Industries, plans to develop the country's first supersonic drone, company executives said. TAI showcased its “Aksungur” drone (“gyrfalcon” in English) earlier this month at the International Defence Industry Fair in Istanbul. The Aksungur is a new drone that can reportedly reach a maximum speed of 180 kph. According to Temel Kotil, TAI's chief executive official, the Goksungur (“peregrine falcon” in English) will be a supersonic version of the Aksungur. The Goksungur is set to have a maximum speed of 380 kph. Kotil said TAI developed the Aksungur, a twin-engine-powered aircraft, in 18 months. The Aksungur has a maximum payload of 750 kilograms. He said TAI manufactured two Aksungur drones for test flights and will deliver them this year to the Turkish Armed Forces. After completing the Aksungur program, TAI engineers will set out to work on the Goksungur program. TAI designed, developed and built the medium-altitude, long-endurance Anka, Turkey's first indigenous UAV. It also developed the Anka-S, a satellite-controlled version. TAI manufactures aviation components for Airbus, Lockheed Martin and Boeing, with annual exports worth $500 million. It is a partner in the U.S.-led, multinational Joint Strike Fighter program that builds the F-35 fighter jet. The Turkish company also produces the T129, a helicopter gunship, under license from the Italian-British company AgustaWestland. TAI expects a 2019 turnover of $2.6 billion. https://www.defensenews.com/unmanned/2019/05/13/turkish-company-reveals-plans-to-develop-a-supersonic-drone/

  • US, Poland to Discuss Potential F-35 Sale, Air Force Secretary Says

    14 mai 2019 | International, Aérospatial

    US, Poland to Discuss Potential F-35 Sale, Air Force Secretary Says

    BY MARCUS WEISGERBER A U.S. delegation is scheduled to brief Polish defense officials eager to buy the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter later this month, U.S. Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson said Monday. The American team is expected to discuss the costs of buying the Lockheed Martin-made jet as well as the warfighting capabilities it would bring to the Polish military. “They want to deepen their relationship with the United States of America in part by interoperability of advanced equipment,” Wilson said after a Meridian International Center event in Washington. “Those discussions are continuing. We're providing the information that might be needed for them to make a decision.” Poland has been looking to replace its Soviet-era MiG-29 Fulcrum and Su-22 Fitter fighters for several years. Its air force has 31 MiG-29s and and 18 Su-22s, according to the International Institute for Strategic Studies' 2019 Military Balance. In recent weeks, Polish officials said they would buy 32 F-35s. “The Polish government has decided that they want the F-35 and they're in discussions with the United States,” Wilson said Monday. U.S. officials heading to Poland is a sign that the potential deal is going through the standard foreign military sale process. The F-35's design and electronic equipment make it difficult to track for advanced surface-to-air missiles — like the long-range S-300 SAMs that Russia deploys in its Kaliningrad exclave north of Poland. When the U.S. Air Force deployed F-15 fighters from the 104th Fighter Wing to Estonia in 2016, the jets flew close to those Russian surface-to-air missiles. “When you take off [in Estonia] you were either in or very close to being in a Russian [surface-to-air-missile] system out of Kaliningrad,” Col. Tom Bladen, operations officer with the 104th Fighter Wing, told Defense One in October 2016. Earlier this year, the U.S. Marine Corps flew its F-35B jump jets in Syria, where Russia has also deployed the S-300. Last month, the F-35 program director listed Poland as a potential purchaser along with Greece, Singapore, Spain, and Romania. Vice Adm. Mat Winer submitted his written testimony to the House Armed Services tactical air and land forces subcommittee. Later in April, Poland Defense Minister Mariusz Blaszczak told local media that a F-35 deal was “not far away.” While the sale has not been approved by the U.S. State Department, Wilson said it came up when she visited Poland in April. “[T]hey want to be allied with the United States,” the secretary said. “If there's one thing that's really clear, is they fear and detest the Russians.” Wilson touted Warsaw's defense spending, which has been increasing for nearly three decades. Poland is one of seven NATO members who spends above 2 percent of its annual gross domestic product on defense. Buying a fifth-generation fighter is expensive and includes an abundance of training, infrastructure, and maintenance costs beyond the aircraft themselves. Right now, an F-35A, the Air Force version of the Joint Strike Fighter, costs just under $90 million each. For comparison purposes, in January 2018, the Pentagon estimated the sale of 34 F-35s to Belgium at $6.53 billion when all associated costs are factored in. Poland already flies 48 Lockheed-made F-16 fighters. https://www.defenseone.com/business/2019/05/mw-poland-f-35/156971/

  • Like it or not, the U.S. needs to be a key part of Canada’s next-gen jet procurement process

    13 mai 2019 | Local, Aérospatial

    Like it or not, the U.S. needs to be a key part of Canada’s next-gen jet procurement process

    ELINOR SLOAN, CONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL RICK BOWMER/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Elinor Sloan, professor of international relations in the department of political science at Carleton University, is a fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute. For a bid to buy a plane designed to cut quickly through the skies, Ottawa's pursuit of a future-generation fighter jet has been a long and torturous slog. In 1997, Jean Chrétien's Liberal government joined the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program, a U.S.-led initiative conceived as a new way for allies to work together to design, develop and produce a fifth-generation fighter aircraft. In 2006, Ottawa signed a formal memorandum of understanding that gave Canada and the other eight partner nations the exclusive right to compete for contracts to produce such aircraft and, since 2007, Canadian companies have won more than US$1.3-billion in defence contracts related to the Joint Strike Fighter. With a production line that will be operating at full capacity starting this year, and is expected to produce about 10 times as many aircraft as exist today over the next few decades, this number promises to grow substantially. Meanwhile, Canada's nearly 40-year-old fleet of fighter jets – the CF-18s – continues to age. In 2010, the Harper government shelved its plan to sole-source buy the Joint Strike Fighter to replace them after a public outcry and a damning auditor-general's report that found significant weaknesses in the process used by the Department of National Defence. Then, when the Liberals took office in 2015 and promised an open and fair competition to replace the CF-18s, it also banned the F-35 from bidding – two contradictory positions. The Trudeau government quietly dropped that ban last year, and pre-qualified four companies to bid on a contract worth at least $15-billion: Sweden's Saab Gripen, Britain's Airbus Eurofighter, the U.S.'s Boeing F/A-18 Super Hornet and, yes, Lockheed Martin's F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. According to letters released last week, though, the U.S. government threatened to pull the Lockheed Martin F-35 from consideration last year over Ottawa's insistence that Canada receive industrial benefits from the winning bid. In response, Ottawa relaxed its requirement on Thursday: Where bidders once had to commit to spend 100 per cent of the value of the aircraft's acquisition and sustainment in Canada, bids will now only lose points in a three-category scoring system in the review process, instead. With such exhausting twists and incompatible statements, it's little surprise that it took three and a half years of the government's four-year mandate just to get to the formal request-for-proposal stage. But there is a way out of this morass: pursuing a back-to-basics focus on why we need this aircraft and what we need it to do. To do so, we must focus on the proposed jets' promised technical capabilities, which are paramount, and rightly weighted the highest of that three-category scoring system. The second category is cost, which of course is important to any government. The third is creating and sustaining a highly skilled work force within our own borders, a goal enshrined in Canada's industrial trade benefits (ITB) policy, which requires a winning bid to guarantee it will make investments in Canada equal to the value of the contract. Each bid is scored by these three categories, weighed 60-20-20, respectively. However, the Joint Strike Fighter program, which Canada has spent millions to join, does not fit neatly into the ITB policy. In those letters last year, the Pentagon and Lockheed Martin pointed out that Canada's ITB terms are inconsistent with – and indeed prohibited by – the memorandum of understanding Canada signed in 2006, which says partners cannot impose industrial compensation measures. The solution reached on Thursday allows that memorandum to be obeyed, but since Canada will still give higher grades to bids that follow its ITB policy, questions remain as to whether the playing field has really been levelled. All of this is important because of the growing competition between the major powers. Russian bombers and fighters, for example, are increasingly testing the boundaries of Canadian and U.S. airspace. More than ever, the focus needs to be interoperability with the United States, working together on NORAD and helping NATO allies in Europe. As a flying command-and-control platform, rather than a mere fighter, Canada's next-generation jet must work with the United States' most sophisticated systems, and include a seamless and secure communications capability – that is a critical and non-negotiable criterion. Indeed, as DND has said,the United States will need to certify the winning jet meets Washington's security standards. Some may question the federal government's decision to relax the ITB rules, and to grant this certification sign-off. But whatever Canada buys must be able to address threats to us and to our allies until well into the 2060s. Our relationship with the United States, both in terms of geopolitics and military technology, is crucial. Despite our trade tiff, the United States remains our most important strategic partner. Canada can either take an active part in our own security, or leave it to the United States. https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-the-us-needs-to-be-a-key-part-of-canadas-next-gen-jet-procurement/

  • Government of Canada awards contract for new space-based search and rescue technology

    13 mai 2019 | Local, Aérospatial, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Government of Canada awards contract for new space-based search and rescue technology

    SAINTE-ANNE-DE-BELLEVUE, QC, May 10, 2019 /CNW/ - Through Canada's defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged, the Government of Canada is ensuring that our women and men in uniform have the equipment they need to do their jobs and to protect Canadians. Today, the Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport and Francis Scarpaleggia, Member of Parliament for Lac-Saint-Louis, on behalf of the Honourable Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Public Services and Procurement and Accessibility, announced that the Government of Canada has awarded a $39-million contract to Macdonald, Dettwiler and Associates Corporation (MDA) of Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, to design, build and deliver 10 search and rescue repeaters for National Defence's Medium Earth Orbit Search and Rescue (MEOSAR) system. This contract will help create or maintain 44 jobs over the length of the contract, which will stimulate economic growth in Quebec. Deployed on a satellite, a repeater detects signals from distress beacons across the country and along Canada's coastlines and relays them to a ground station. As part of an agreement between National Defence and the United States Air Force (USAF), the Canadian repeaters will be hosted on USAF's next-generation GPS satellites. The MEOSAR system is expected to deliver improved response times for search and rescue activities and increase accuracy to locate people, ships or planes in distress. It will replace Canada's current search and rescue system, which has been in place for several decades. Quotes "Our Government is committed to providing the Canadian Armed Forces with cutting-edge technology for search and rescue operations to save those in distress in Canada. These repeaters will be designed and built with homegrown Canadian aerospace expertise, supporting our aerospace sector and stimulating economic growth in Quebec." The Honourable Marc Garneau Minister of Transport "Through this investment, our government is supporting the Canadian Armed Forces in their important work to help save people's lives both on land and sea. The contract with MDA will also help sustain economic growth in our community with 44 good middle-class jobs. ." Francis Scarpaleggia, Member of Parliament for Lac-Saint-Louis "This project builds on the successful partnership between National Defence and MDA to develop innovative solutions that are vital to Canada's sovereignty and security. Once qualified as operational, this system will dramatically improve both the speed and location accuracy for detecting beacons, and as a result, greatly enhance the coordination and dispatch of search and rescue teams to help people in distress." Mike Greenley Group President of Macdonald, Dettwiler and Associates Corporation Quick facts The Government of Canada's defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged, reaffirms Canada's commitment to invest in our military, and sustain our search and rescue capabilities. Alongside the Canadian Coast Guard, the Canadian Armed Forces responds to more than 9,000 search and rescue calls annually, approximately 1,000 of which result in the launching of search and rescue air assets. The contract will run until February 1, 2029. The government may extend the contract to August 1, 2034, if it elects to acquire an additional 12 repeaters. The contract was awarded following an open, fair and transparent competitive procurement process, which included a fairness monitor who observed the procurement process. https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/government-of-canada-awards-contract-for-new-space-based-search-and-rescue-technology-832448437.html

  • Les futurs avions de chasse canadiens pourraient subir des modifications dictées par les Américains

    13 mai 2019 | Local, Aérospatial

    Les futurs avions de chasse canadiens pourraient subir des modifications dictées par les Américains

    La Presse canadienne Le plus haut responsable de l'approvisionnement militaire au Canada affirme que les prochains avions de chasse des Forces armées canadiennes pourraient subir des modifications pour être certifiés selon les normes américaines, mais il ne s'inquiète pas d'une possible ingérence politique des États-Unis. Correction : Dans une dépêche transmise vendredi, La Presse canadienne avait erronément rapporté que les États-Unis devraient approuver tout achat d'avion de chasse par le Canada. En réalité, le Canada peut acheter le modèle qu'il veut, mais l'appareil choisi pourrait subir des modifications pour être certifié selon leurs normes. Patrick Finn, sous-ministre adjoint du Groupe des matériels du ministère de la Défense nationale, a fait savoir que les États-Unis devaient certifier que l'avion de combat choisi par le Canada est conforme aux normes de sécurité américaines. En effet, quel que soit l'appareil qui va remplacer les vieux CF-18, il doit être compatible avec le réseau de renseignement le plus sécurisé des États-Unis, qui vise à protéger l'Amérique du Nord par l'entremise du Commandement de la défense aérospatiale de l'Amérique du Nord (NORAD). Le NORAD utilise un réseau de satellites, de radars basés au sol, de radars aéroportés, ainsi que des avions de chasse pour détecter et intercepter les menaces aériennes visant le Canada et les États-Unis. Des représentants de l'industrie craignent que cette obligation serve de prétexte aux États-Unis pour empêcher le Canada d'acheter les modèles Eurofighter Typhoon ou Saab Gripen, fabriqués par des sociétés européennes. Ces entreprises sont des concurrentes des constructeurs américains. Ces inquiétudes sont particulièrement vives en ce moment, étant donné l'attention particulière qu'accorde l'administration du président Donald Trump à la vente de produits américains à des pays étrangers. Bien qu'il soit incapable d'exclure entièrement ce risque, Patrick Finn indique que cette certification ne sera nécessaire que dans plusieurs années, et que des responsables américains ont déjà manifesté leur ouverture à l'achat d'avions non américains par le Canada. https://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1169226/futurs-avions-chasse-canadiens-approbation-washington

  • In row with Turkey, US searching for alternative F-35 component vendors

    13 mai 2019 | International, Aérospatial

    In row with Turkey, US searching for alternative F-35 component vendors

    Ashley Roque, Washington, DC - Jane's Defence Weekly Pentagon leaders are searching for alternative vendors to manufacture several F-35 Joint Strike Fighter components in the case Washington and Ankara are unable to resolve their dispute over latter's plan to field the S-400 air defence system. Ellen Lord, the US Department of Defense's undersecretary of defence for acquisition and sustainment, spoke with reporters on 10 May about a host of topics including the ongoing quarrel with Turkey stemming from its plan to field the Russian-built S-400 system over the US-built Patriot system. "We have been very clear that the F-35 and the S-400 are incompatible," Lord told reporters. "We have, for some time now, been working to look at alternative sources of supply for the F-35 supply chain that is inside Turkey right now," she later added. https://www.janes.com/article/88442/in-row-with-turkey-us-searching-for-alternative-f-35-component-vendors

  • La défense européenne : utopie ou réalités

    13 mai 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité, Autre défense

    La défense européenne : utopie ou réalités

    Nicolas Gros-Verheyde (B2) C'est le titre de l'ouvrage que je prépare pour les éditions du Villard. ‘Utopie ou réalités', c'est bien le dilemme auquel est confrontée aujourd'hui l'Europe de la défense ou la défense européenne Je ne compte pas donner de bonne recette ou asséner une vérité. Dans ce domaine, il y a assez de théorie et d'idéologie, souvent assez binaire. La principale ambition de cet ouvrage est ailleurs. Il s'agit de découvrir et d'expliquer les dernières nouveautés, les acquis déjà opérationnels, les projets en cours, les défis ou simplement les idées. Tout cela avec des arguments, précis, puisés aux meilleures sources, et de façon la plus compréhensible possible. Nous visiterons ainsi le fonds européen de défense, l'hypothèse d'une DG Défense à la Commission européenne, le commandement aérien intégré, l'ébauche d'un QG permanent militaire européen, l'initiative européenne d'intervention comme les idées d'avoir un Conseil européen de sécurité ou une armée européenne. Un ou deux invités surprises viendront compléter ou nuancer mon propos, tel un contrepoint. Cet ouvrage est à paraitre dès que possible et au plus tard d'ici l'automne. Il aurait dû sortir avant ; j'en avais parlé à quelques uns d'entre vous. Mais ma résidence dans les Alpes a brûlé en partie (1). Ce qui a un peu bousculé mon planning, m'obligeant à départir une grosse partie de mon temps pour rétablir au plus vite ce qui est mon principal poumon et ma principale respiration dans ce monde complexe et où la rapidité prime sur la compréhension, ma résidence d'écriture en quelque sorte. (Nicolas Gros-Verheyde) Heureusement nous avions une bonne assurance (du moins je l'espère), la Maïf pour ne pas la nommer. Je compte vivement sur cet assureur pour nous aider à franchir ce mauvais pas, préserver le maximum et rétablir l'habitation le plus vite possible. https://www.bruxelles2.eu/2019/05/11/defense-europeenne-utopie-ou-realite/

  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - May 10, 2019

    13 mai 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité, Autre défense

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - May 10, 2019

    DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY LiteFighter System LLC,** Canton, Georgia, has been awarded a maximum $200,000,000 firm-fixed-priced, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for commercial-off-the-shelf shelters and tents. This was a competitive acquisition with one response received. This is a 12-month base contract with three one-year option periods. Locations of performance are Kentucky, Mississippi and Georgia, with a May 9, 2020, performance completion date. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2020 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE1C1-19-D-1130). Buffalo Supply Inc., Lafayette, Colorado, has been awarded a maximum $42,422,105 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for medical/surgical supplies. This was a competitive acquisition with 16 responses received. This is a five-year contract with no options. Location of performance is Colorado, with a May 9, 2024, performance completion date. Using customers are Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and federal civilian agencies. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2024 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE2DE-19-D-0008). Varec Inc., Norcross, Georgia, has been awarded a maximum $25,998,175 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for electronic point of sales and supporting services for fixed facility fuel distribution devices. This was a competitive acquisition with four responses received. This is a five-year base contract with 10 one-year option periods. Location of performance is worldwide support, both in the continental U.S. and outside the continental U.S. (OCONUS), with a May 9, 2024, performance completion date. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, National Guard and Coast Guard. Type of appropriation is fiscal year 2019 through 2024 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Contracting Services Office, Columbus, Ohio (SP4702-19-D-0002). Transaero Inc.,* Melville, New York, has been awarded a maximum $10,504,719 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for air data computers. This was a limited competitive acquisition using justification from Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1(a)(2), which states only one responsible source and no other supplies or services will satisfy agency requirements, and extended to include only one or a limited number of responsible sources. This is a five-year contract with no option periods. Locations of performance are New York and the United Kingdom, with a May 10, 2024, performance completion date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2024 Army working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama (SPRRA1-19-D-0074). ARMY Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Sierra Vista, Arizona, was awarded a $163,588,331 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for Hunter unmanned aircraft system fleet support for operations, maintenance, engineering, re-engineering and remanufacturing. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work will be performed in Sierra Vista, Arizona, with an estimated completion date of May 9, 2020. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $41,883,787 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-19-C-0033). Raytheon Missiles Systems, Tucson, Arizona, was awarded a $101,333,802 modification (P00014) to contract W31P4Q-17-C-0194 to procure Tactically-Launched Optically-Tracked Wireless-Guided missiles. Work will be performed in Tucson, Arizona, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 31, 2022. Fiscal 2017 other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $101,333,802 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity. HHI Corp.,* Ogden, Utah, was awarded a $48,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract repair and construction at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. Bids were solicited via the internet with four received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of May 9, 2026. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sacramento, California, is the contracting activity (W91238-19-D-0071). G.L.H.C. Services Inc.,* Lumberton, North Carolina, was awarded a $13,000,000 modification (P00003) to contract W912HN-17-D-0004 for general construction and design-build construction. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of March 31, 2022. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah, Georgia, is the contracting activity. Trend Construction Inc., Orlando, Florida, was awarded a $13,000,000 modification (P00004) to contract W912HN-15-D-0001 for general construction and design-build construction. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of March 25, 2020. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah, Georgia, is the contracting activity. Lockheed Martin Corp., Grand Prairie, Texas, was awarded a $10,508,635 modification (P00049) to contract W31P4Q-16-C-0102 to develop and qualify a modular rocket pod and launch tubes for the Guided Multiple Launch Rocket System that will be adaptable to future munitions. Work will be performed in Grand Prairie, Texas, with an estimated completion date of Oct. 31, 2019. Fiscal 2018 missile procurement, Army funds in the amount of $10,508,635 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity. Milliman Solutions LLC, Seattle, Washington, was awarded a $9,010,000 firm-fixed-price contract to provide the U.S. Military Entrance Processing Command a commercial web-based prescription medication reporting system. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of May 31, 2024. U.S. Army Health Contracting Activity, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, is the contracting activity (W81K04-19-D-0017). Science Applications International Corp., Reston, Virginia, was awarded an $8,339,000 modification (0001 34) to contract W31P4Q-18-A-0011 for systems engineering support. Work will be performed in Reston, Virginia, with an estimated completion date of May 3, 2020. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $8,339,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity. AIR FORCE Harris Corp., Clifton, New Jersey, has been awarded $71,761,512 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for engineering services. This contract provides for nonrecurring engineering services for AN/ ALQ-172 countermeasures systems, to include performing a form, fit, function, and interface replacement of the AN/ALQ-172 Line Replaceable Unit (LRU)-2, and LRU-3, documents and/or technical orders. Work will be performed in Clifton, New Jersey, and is expected to be complete by Nov. 9, 2022. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2019 consolidated sustainment activity group-engineering funds in the full amount are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Sustainment Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA8522-19-C-0003). The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, has been awarded an $11,205,341 indefinite-delivery requirements contract for F-15 sustaining engineering services. This contract provides for post-production support tasks/services unique to the original equipment manufacturer as required to maintain an adequate level of continuous sustaining engineering and logistics support for the Air Force and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) F-15 fleets. Work will be performed primarily in St. Louis, Missouri, and is expected to be complete by Nov. 9, 2027. This contract involves FMS to Saudi Arabia and Israel. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. No funds are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contacting activity (FA8505‐19‐D-0001). *Small business **Service-disabled veteran-owned small business https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1844479/source/GovDelivery/

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