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  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - August 2, 2019

    5 août 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - August 2, 2019

    AIR FORCE HEBCO Inc., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, has been awarded an $80,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for A-10 technical order sustainment. This contract provides for 10 years of non-personal technical services in support of technical order sustainment activities by providing technically accurate and up-to-date digital technical data. Work will be performed at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; and Clearfield, Utah, and is expected to be complete by Aug. 1, 2030. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $445,739 are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Hill Air Force Base, Utah, is the contracting activity (FA8202-19-D-0003). The Boeing Co., Seattle, Washington, has been awarded a not-to-exceed $55,500,000 undefinitized contract action modification (P00177) to the previously awarded, FA8625-11-C-6600, for KC-46 engineering, manufacturing and development contract. This modification is for the system level hardware and software critical design review of the boom telescope actuator redesign. Work will be performed at Seattle, Washington, and is expected to be completed February 2021. Fiscal 2018 research and development funds in the amount of $20,845,672 are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity. Rockwell Collins Simulation & Training Solutions, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, has been awarded a $40,219,702 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for E-8 Aircrew Training Device sustainment. This contract provides for contractor logistics support and training system support center operations of the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System Aircrew Training Device. Work will be performed at Robins Air Force Base, Georgia; and Sterling, Virginia, and is expected to be complete by Aug. 3, 2029. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2019 Air National Guard operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $3,556,865 are being obligated on the first delivery order at the time of award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA8529-19-D-0001). Raytheon Co. Space and Airborne Systems, McKinney, Texas, has been awarded a $23,817,657 contract for two prototype High Energy Laser Weapon Systems (HELWS). This award provides for outside continental U.S. (OCONUS) field assessment for purposes of experimentation including, but is not limited to, 12 months of in-field operation by Air Force personnel against unmanned aerial systems threats. Work will be performed OCONUS and is expected to be completed by Nov. 1, 2020. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $23,817,657 are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8650-19-9-9326). DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY C&C Produce Inc.,* North Kansas City, Missouri, has been awarded a maximum $48,000,000 firm-fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for fresh fruits and vegetables. This was a competitive acquisition with three responses received. This is a 36-month contract with no option periods. Locations of performance are Kansas and Missouri, with a July 30, 2022, performance completion date. Using customers are Army, Air Force, and Department of Agriculture schools and reservations. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2022 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE300-19-D-P345). ARMY NTVI Enterprises LLC,* Falls Church, Virginia (W9127S-19-D-6001); Global Engineering & Construction LLC,* Renton, Washington (W9127S-19-D-6002); KJS Support Services JV LLC,* Fort Worth, Texas (W9127S-19-D-6003); and Royce Construction Services LLC,* Reston, Virginia (W9127S-19-D-6000), will compete for each order of the $45,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for mechanical infrastructure repair services. Bids were solicited via the internet with 10 received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 1, 2022. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Little Rock, Arkansas, is the contracting activity. American Ordnance, Middletown, Iowa, was awarded a $43,351,782 modification (0003 28) to contract W52P1J-16-D-0050 for M795 155mm projectile load assemble and pack. Work will be performed in Middletown, Iowa, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2022. Fiscal 2017, 2018 and 2019 procurement of ammunition, Army funds in the amount of $43,351,782 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, is the contracting activity. DEFENSE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AGENCY HGSNet LLC, Vienna, Virginia, was awarded a Direct 8(a), firm-fixed-price contract, HC1084-19-C-0006, for development, deployment and sustainment (DD&S) services. These services include requirements analysis, software engineering, systems integration and interoperability, data engineering and management, test, deployment, and development, security and operations (DevSecOps), cloud, infrastructure engineering and transitioning systems to operations in support of the National Background Investigations System. The place of performance will be at the contractor's location in Vienna, Virginia. The contract ceiling is $21,932,725 funded by fiscal 2019 research, development, testing and evaluation funds; and operations and maintenance funds. The proposal was solicited via email to HGSNet LLC. The period of performance consists of one one-year base period and one six-month option period. The period of performance for the base year is Aug. 5, 2019, through Aug. 4, 2020, and the option period follows through to Feb. 5, 2021. The Defense Information Technology Organization, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, is the contracting activity. Kapili Services LLC, Orlando, Florida, was awarded a Direct 8(a), firm-fixed-price contract, HC1084-19-C-0005, for system engineering and technical assistance (SETA) support services. The face value of this action is $18,095,364 funded by fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds. The total cumulative value of the contract is $18,095,364. Performance will be at the contractor's facility located in Orlando, Florida. The proposal was solicited via email to Kapili Services LLC. The period of performance consists of one one-year base period and two one-year options. The period of performance is for the base year is Aug. 5, 2019, through Aug. 4, 2020, and the option years follow consecutively through Aug. 4, 2022. The Defense Information Technology Contracting Organization, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, is the contracting activity. NAVY The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, is awarded $8,905,835 for modification P00023 to a previously awarded cost-plus-fixed-fee contract, N00019-16-C-0032, to continue software development efforts for calendar year 2019 in support of the Next Generation Jammer. Work will be performed in St. Louis, Missouri, and is expected to be completed in December 2019. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funds in the amount of $8,905,835 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. *Small Business https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1924880/source/GovDelivery/

  • Land Systems Integration Team Is Leader in Model-Based Systems Engineering

    5 août 2019 | International, Naval

    Land Systems Integration Team Is Leader in Model-Based Systems Engineering

    By C. Michaela Judge, Naval Information Warfare Center Atlantic Public Affairs CHARLESTON, S.C. (NNS) -- The Land Systems Integration (LSI) Division at Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC) Atlantic continues to be an enterprise leader in Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) for their work on land systems modernization and integration. MBSE is an engineering approach that utilizes a common, digital tool suite allowing all team members – from engineer to sponsor – to have awareness, line-of-sight and an understanding of the interaction between the various moving parts across the systems engineering and project lifecycle. LSI's Vehicular Technology Transition (VTT) team incorporates the full range of MBSE techniques into their systems engineering projects to support the Marine Corps and has had great success in continuing this approach in their daily work. “What makes LSI and our team specifically successful is the depth of knowledge in implementation of using the MBSE Tool Suite,” said Tim Turner, VTT team lead. “Our engineering work isn't radically different than any other engineering groups across the Command; it's how we're putting the data in the system and making it transparent to everyone that needs to have access to it.” Though engineers have been performing systems engineering in some capacity for decades, using this model-based approach provides an added advantage to deliver effective and timely solutions to the warfighter. “Our MBSE Tool Suite is a set of seamlessly integrated engineering lifecycle management tools that work together as one,” said Jacob Witmer, VTT team Military GPS User Equipment (MGUE) project lead. “We use these tools to manage requirements and architectures, plan projects, track changes, manage quality, and provide an enterprise library management system where you catalog, organize, use, reuse, manage, and report on any type of software, technology, or business asset.” In the vehicle transition domain, the VTT team utilized MBSE techniques to solve real-world challenges for the warfighter. Most recently, they used MBSE to conduct global positioning system (GPS) integration work conducted on the Joint-Light Tactical Vehicle, the MGUE Program's lead platform. “When we look at all of the people our team has to work with on this integration project, we have to manage a lot of different data, to include where the trucks are manufactured, where GPS is managed, the performance level of the GPS card, the truck integration and more,” said Witmer. “There are a lot of players, managing a lot of data in a lot of different formats from different geographic parts of the country. That's really what the MBSE Tool Suite is designed to do – manage, connect and link the data to see how they impact each other.” One cost-avoidance benefit of using the MBSE Tool Suite, in time and man-hours, includes the ability to quickly build reports. “We can build 150-page project requirements documents in three minutes because the data is already in the Tool Suite,” said Ryan Longshore, VTT team technical lead. “There is an investment in time and energy upfront in loading the data, but a report that would take 30 to 90 days is done in a matter of minutes and everything from that project is captured in the report.” The team's use of MBSE is not only essential to connecting and maintaining data across a project, but also a necessary resource in developing physical models and solutions in a fraction of the time previously needed to fulfill a warfighter requirement. “Our team works within the Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL) to design and test on multiple vehicular platforms,” said Turner. “The lab allows us to execute MBSE across all team functions, from mission thread to risk analysis or program management.” The team maintains physical models for all of the vehicle platforms they support. When a requirement from a sponsor arrives, the team can use tools within the SIL to design and print a three-dimensional piece of hardware and test it on an existing model before they touch a physical vehicle. The team conducts engineering, mechanical and software-related integration testing and design work all within the laboratory. “It's all about testing upfront, learning upfront, failing faster and learning from it and moving on and improving on the design,” said Turner. As the team designs and tests within the lab, they also update the MBSE Tool Suite is to capture lessons learned, integration challenges and real-time project data for all team members to access. “The beauty of the suite being so integrated is that it doesn't matter what type of systems engineering methodology a project uses, the tools can be tailored to meet a myriad of engineering processes and organizing the data by methodology saves countless hours in digging around trying to find historical artifacts,” said Witmer. The team can now complete an integration project that previously took 18 to 36 months as quickly as six to nine months, without sacrificing quality, thanks to the value of MBSE. With VTT and other teams reaping the benefits of MBSE, NIWC Atlantic created a training and workforce development path to work toward a Command-wide adoption of this method. Communities of interest, industry engagements and training events on MBSE methods are a few of the efforts implemented to date. The VTT uses these training approaches, to a smaller-scale, to continue to encourage MBSE implementation and help employees understand the power of using a model-based approach to apply agility in executing warfighter solutions. “We're seeing the benefits and through MBSE my team has the flexibility to fail fast and learn a lot upfront,” said Turner. The team's success with the MBSE Tool Suite is a Command-wide example of how the transparency and connectivity of engineering data help to provide integration solutions to NIWC Atlantic customers with a high confidence of success. As a part of Naval Information Warfare Systems Command, NIWC Atlantic provides systems engineering and acquisition to deliver information warfare capabilities to the naval, joint and national warfighter through the acquisition, development, integration, production, test, deployment, and sustainment of interoperable command, control, communications, computer, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance, cyber and information technology capabilities. https://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=110447

  • CH-53E Heavy Lift Helicopter Reaches One Million Flight Hours

    5 août 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval

    CH-53E Heavy Lift Helicopter Reaches One Million Flight Hours

    Aircraft First Entered Service With The USMC In 1981 The CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter reached a major milestone this year by logging more than one million flight hours since it first entered service with the Marine Corps in 1981. The CH-53E is a versatile machine used for amphibious assault and long-range insertion, delivering troops, vehicles and supplies. This rapid resupply vehicle is still one of the most used aircraft in the United States military air arsenal. “The CH-53E has seen more work than was ever anticipated it would see,” said Major Matthew Baumann, H-53 In-Service, Naval Air Systems Command Heavy Lift Helicopter program office (PMA-261) co-lead. Currently, there are 142 CH-53E Super Stallions in service. Though out of production, the CH-53E is in the middle of a “RESET” – a rolling period of rebuilding, upgrading and increasing safety, reliability and capabilities to lengthen its service life through 2032. According to Baumann, the first 25 helicopters have completed their RESET process, “allowing the squadron commanders to plan for training, operations and maintenance with renewed confidence,” he said. Resetting of the CH-53E fleet is an important segue from the current platform to the new CH-53K King Stallion, which will be its heavy-lift replacement. “The CH-53K is the most powerful helicopter ever built by the United States military,” said Colonel Perrin, PMA-261 program manager. “It will be safer, faster and more capable than any previous heavy lift helicopter in the battlespace.” Its development is currently in the testing and capability requirements phase, with a goal of bringing the CH-53K to fleet Marines by 2024. “It's a game-changer,” said Perrin. “We can't wait to have the K available for fleet use. But for now we've got a capable, reliable and safe helicopter doing heavy-lift for our Marines.” http://www.aero-news.net/index.cfm?do=main.textpost&id=8e63f37f-9874-4fb9-acf1-72e67d6a9cbd

  • CH-53E Heavy Lift Helicopter Reaches One Million Flight Hours

    5 août 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval

    CH-53E Heavy Lift Helicopter Reaches One Million Flight Hours

    Aircraft First Entered Service With The USMC In 1981 The CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter reached a major milestone this year by logging more than one million flight hours since it first entered service with the Marine Corps in 1981. The CH-53E is a versatile machine used for amphibious assault and long-range insertion, delivering troops, vehicles and supplies. This rapid resupply vehicle is still one of the most used aircraft in the United States military air arsenal. “The CH-53E has seen more work than was ever anticipated it would see,” said Major Matthew Baumann, H-53 In-Service, Naval Air Systems Command Heavy Lift Helicopter program office (PMA-261) co-lead. Currently, there are 142 CH-53E Super Stallions in service. Though out of production, the CH-53E is in the middle of a “RESET” – a rolling period of rebuilding, upgrading and increasing safety, reliability and capabilities to lengthen its service life through 2032. According to Baumann, the first 25 helicopters have completed their RESET process, “allowing the squadron commanders to plan for training, operations and maintenance with renewed confidence,” he said. Resetting of the CH-53E fleet is an important segue from the current platform to the new CH-53K King Stallion, which will be its heavy-lift replacement. “The CH-53K is the most powerful helicopter ever built by the United States military,” said Colonel Perrin, PMA-261 program manager. “It will be safer, faster and more capable than any previous heavy lift helicopter in the battlespace.” Its development is currently in the testing and capability requirements phase, with a goal of bringing the CH-53K to fleet Marines by 2024. “It's a game-changer,” said Perrin. “We can't wait to have the K available for fleet use. But for now we've got a capable, reliable and safe helicopter doing heavy-lift for our Marines.” http://www.aero-news.net/index.cfm?do=main.textpost&id=8e63f37f-9874-4fb9-acf1-72e67d6a9cbd

  • 444 Combat Support Squadron: Combat support from above

    2 août 2019 | Local, Aérospatial

    444 Combat Support Squadron: Combat support from above

    By Ben Forrest & Mike Reyno On a given day in the remote, sparsely-populated terrain over Happy Valley-Goose Bay and rural Labrador, it is often cloudy or snowing, or both. The winters are brutal and long; the summers are warm and wet, and militaries from all over the world have used this rugged patch of land for austere weather training. If something goes wrong in one of these training exercises–an injury or any other kind of disaster–the pilots and medical technicians from 444 Combat Support Squadron are there in a hurry. This small but effective crew of 35 military personnel and five civilians provides rapid response during training exercises at 5 Wing Goose Bay using three CH-146 Griffon helicopters. On occasion, aircrews also perform utility transport and secondary search and rescue (SAR). “We try to have a real team-oriented atmosphere,” said Maj Ryan Snider, commanding officer of 444 Squadron. “You're not two ships passing in the night, as many other squadrons and Wings are. You get a chance to interact with people on a regular basis, and get to know them far better than you would at a normal [posting.]” The squadron, one of three Combat Support squadrons in the Air Force, draws a mix of new recruits and pilots and technicians with previous Griffon experience. Postings usually last three years, and they can be an effective way for new pilots to get their feet wet. “I love it,” said Capt Marc Saucier. “The area can be really challenging, just because everything's so remote. I don't think you find terrain like this anywhere else in Canada, where everything's so far apart. “But it's been really good. There's not enough people in Labrador to necessitate us being called out that often in the first place, but what we do, it's pretty different each time.” Pilots in 444 Squadron average about 300 flying hours a year, and the posting can also be a refreshing change for seasoned pilots who transfer from other bases. “This is nice with the family, because I'm home all the time, other than the odd night,” said Capt Neil Gabourie, a Griffon pilot who has also spent time with 427 Special Operations Aviation Squadron at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, Ont. 444 Squadron traces its history to 1947, where it was originally activated in Rivers, Man. It later transferred to St-Hubert, Que., where it operated the Sabre fighter jets, and then moved to Baden-Soellingen, Germany as part of Canada's commitment to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). The squadron disbanded in 1963, but was stood up about two months later and equipped with the CF-104 Starfighter, which it operated until 1967 before being disbanded again. Five years later the squadron was re-activated and renamed 444 Tactical Helicopter Squadron flying the CH-136 Kiowa. Stood down on Apr. 1, 1992, the squadron was reactivated in Goose Bay in 1993, now equipped with the CH-135 Twin Huey in a rescue and support role. The CH-135 was replaced by the CH-146 in 1996. Today, the squadron operates out of two large hangars that make up a fraction of 5 Wing's massive infrastructure footprint, supporting NORAD's North Warning System radar sites on utility missions and supporting SAR efforts in the area when CH-149 Cormorant helicopters from 9 Wing Gander are not available. “JRCC (Joint Rescue Coordination Centre) Halifax will call upon us from time to time,” said Snider. “They understand we're not a Cormorant ... there are limitations. But they still give us a call and say, ‘What can you provide?' And then we'll do our best.” A major development at 444 Squadron over the last year has been the ongoing replacement of SAR Technicians with Medical Technicians on Griffon flight crews. The transition began in 2018 and once complete, Griffon crews will have two pilots, a flight engineer and a med tech on board. Similar transitions are taking place at 417 Combat Support Squadron at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alta., and 439 Combat Support Squadron at 3 Wing Bagotville, Que. “The med techs will come to us having already undergone their medical technician training,” said Snider. “We'll top up that training to give them familiarization ... to operate at the back of the cabin of the aircraft. We'll train them on spotter duties, and then we'll also train them on how to function on the hoist.” Whereas SAR techs can jump out of helicopters to perform rescues at sea, med techs are not trained in skydiving or water diving and are geared toward land-based operations, said Sgt Adam Blackwell, a med tech. They also use specific hoist, insertion and extraction methods for land-based operations. Med techs are trained as primary care paramedics and have diverse backgrounds that make them extremely versatile. “We also do a lot of clinical and hospital kind of work–not just emergent care, not just tactical care,” said Blackwell. “We are jacks of all trades in the medical field, and used as such in different postings.” Instructed originally by SAR techs during the initial transition, med techs at 444 Squadron have now reached a point where there is a senior lead med tech able to train the more junior members. Recruiting med techs to the relatively isolated community of Goose Bay can be difficult, but many are quickly attracted to the squadron's warm, tight-knit culture once they arrive. “It's a bit different,” said Blackwell. “But honestly, it's pretty fun. If you are an outdoorsy person, this is the place to snowmobile or have an ATV. The fishing here is pretty amazing, too.” The squadron may have experienced a shift in focus in recent years, but its core mission remains the same. “It's that standby response to military operations,” said Snider. “Different customers, different tactics, but the same purpose.” https://www.skiesmag.com/features/444-combat-support-squadron-combat-support-from-above/?utm_source=skies-daily-news-top-story

  • European Hypersonic Cruise Passenger Study Set For New Tests

    2 août 2019 | International, Aérospatial

    European Hypersonic Cruise Passenger Study Set For New Tests

    By Guy Norris A team of European hypersonic researchers are preparing for wind tunnel tests of a Mach 8 concept that is designed to prove technologies for the development of future ultra-long-range, high-speed commercial vehicles and air-breathing space launch systems. Funded under Europe's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program, Stratofly (Stratospheric Flying Opportunities for High-speed Propulsion Concepts) is targeted at fostering hypersonic capabilities for a 300-seat passenger vehicle cruising above 30 km (19 mi.) to TRL (technology readiness level) 6 by 2035. The project builds on the Lapcat waverider concept developed under earlier programs by the European Space Agency/European Space Research and Technology Center. Using the 310-ft.-long Lapcat II MR2.4 version as a reference vehicle, the 30-month Stratofly effort is focused on classic hypersonic technology challenges such as propulsion integration, hot structures and thermal management. In addition, with environmental concerns at the forefront in Europe, the project also includes sustainability considerations such as fuel-burn efficiency, noise and emissions reductions, as well as operational issues such as life-cycle costs, safety and certification. Coordinated by The Polytechnic University of Turin, Italy, the project team believes that sustainable hypersonic travel is feasible through the use of liquid hydrogen fuel and new trajectories that would enable flights from Europe to Australia in 3 hr. Specific targets include 75-100% CO2 reductions per passenger kilometer and 90% reductions in nitrous oxide (NOx) compared to current long-range transport aircraft. A version of the vehicle could also be adapted into the first stage of a two-stage-to-orbit space launch system, says the group. Other members of the 10-strong consortium include the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics in Belgium, which is focused on propulsion and noise; the Netherlands Aerospace Center, NLR, which is also part of the noise study; and CIRA, the Italian aerospace research center, which is conducting high-speed flow analysis. Propulsion systems and climate impact input is provided by Germany's DLR research organization, while ONERA, the French aerospace research center, is focused on emissions as well as plasma-assisted combustion in the vehicle's combined-cycle propulsion system. Sweden's FOI defense research agency is also part of the plasma combustion study. The French National Center for Scientific Research is also evaluating the vehicle's potential climate impact, particularly in areas such as the effects of water droplets from the exhaust in the upper atmosphere. Studies of the overall business plan, human factors and hypersonic traffic management are being conducted by the Hamburg University of Technology, while the Spain-based Civil Engineering Foundation of Galicia is focused on structural analysis and optimization. Like the original Lapcat design, the Stratofly MR3 waverider configuration is dominated by a large elliptical inlet and an integrated nozzle aft located between two canted tail fins. For takeoff and acceleration up to Mach 4.5, the vehicle is powered by six air turbo ramjets (ATR, also known as air turbo rockets) in two bays of three, each fed by secondary inlets in the primary intake. Above this speed, sliding ramps cover the ATR inlets as the vehicle accelerates and transitions to a dual-mode ramjet/scramjet (DMR) for the next phase of the flight. The DMR is housed in the dorsal section, nested between the ATR ramjets, and is designed to operate in ramjet mode to above Mach 5 and scramjet mode up to Mach 8. The scramjet will incorporate a plasma-assisted combustion system to maintain the stability of the flame front and prevent the potential for flameouts. Tests of the plasma system in a combustor will take place later this year at ONERA, where supersonic combustion testing also took place for Lapcat. The tests will be conducted in November-December at ONERA's ATD5 facility and will focus on inlet conditions at Mach 3.7. Also planned for later this year is a test of the full vehicle in the high-enthalpy wind tunnel at DLR's Gottingen research facility. Testing at DLR will run through September 2020 and is expected to target similar free-stream conditions as those tested on Lapcat II—around Mach 7.8. The work will assess aerothermodynamic characteristics and be used to validate the results of earlier computational fluid dynamics analysis of the MR3 design, which incorporates external and internal differences against the reference vehicle. “We elevated the canard [a retractable feature for lower-speed flight] and redesigned the vertical tails,” says Davide Ferretto, a research assistant on the Stratofly team from The Polytechnic University of Turin. “We also redesigned the leading-edge radius of the inlet for increased efficiency as it feeds both propulsion systems.” As part of the redesign, the enclosed passenger compartment, which was divided into two sections running along each side of the vehicle, has been combined into a single cabin in the lower lobe of the fuselage. https://aviationweek.com/propulsion/european-hypersonic-cruise-passenger-study-set-new-tests

  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - Aug 1, 2019

    2 août 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - Aug 1, 2019

    DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Tesoro Refining and Marketing Co., San Antonio, Texas (SPE602-19-D-0506, $348,692,953); BP Products North America Inc., Chicago, Illinois (SPE602-19-D-0514, $315,599,804); Par Hawaii Refining LLC, Houston, Texas (SPE602-19-D-0510, $271,274,321); Valero Marketing and Supply Co., San Antonio, Texas (SPE602-19-D-0504, $260,554,844); Equillon Enterprises LLC, doing business as Shell Oil Products, Houston, Texas (SPE602-19-D-0509, $228,126,037); BP West Coast Products LLC, Blaine, Washington (SPE602-19-D-0512, $157,502,370); U.S. Oil and Refining Co., Tacoma, Washington (SPE602-19-D-0513, $156,746,055); Petro Star Inc.,* Anchorage, Alaska (SPE600-19-D-0505, $110,836,555); Phillips 66 Co., Houston, Texas (SPE602-19-D-0515, $58,246,377); Epic Aviation LLC, Salem, Oregon (SPE602-19-D-0508, $38,905,276); and Sinclair Oil Corp.,* doing business as Sinclair, Salt Lake City, Utah, (SPE602-19-D-0507, $38,197,366), have each been awarded a fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract under solicitation SPE602-19-R-0703 for various types of fuel. These were competitive acquisitions with 21 offers received. They are one-year contracts with a 30-day carryover. Locations of performance are Texas, Illinois, Washington, Alaska, Oregon, Utah, and the Rocky Mountain Region of the continental U.S., with an Oct. 30, 2020, performance completion date. Using customer is Defense Logistics Agency Energy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Energy, Fort Belvoir, Virginia. Petro Star Inc.,* Anchorage, Alaska, has been awarded a maximum $52,630,968 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for JA1 jet fuel. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a one-year contract with a 30-day carryover. Location of performance is Alaska, with an Oct. 30, 2020, performance completion date. Using customer is Air Force. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Energy, Fort Belvoir, Virginia (SPE602-19-D-0517). Sysco Raleigh LLC, Selma, North Carolina, has been awarded a maximum $49,019,871 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-quantity contract for full line food distribution. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a 286-day contract with no option periods. Location of performance is North Carolina, with a May 16, 2020, performance completion date. Using customers are Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and federal civilian agencies. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The contracting agency is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE300-19-D-3230). Oshkosh Defense LLC, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, has been awarded a maximum $27,537,300 firm-fixed-price requirements contract for pneumatic tire wheel assemblies. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a three-year contract with no option periods. Locations of performance are Wisconsin and New Jersey, with a July 29, 2022, performance completion date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2022 Army working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Land and Maritime, Warren, Michigan (SPRDL1-19-D-0130). (Awarded July 30, 2019) U.S. TRANSPORTATION COMMAND Crowley Logistics Inc., Jacksonville, Florida, has been awarded a contract modification, P00009, on contract HTC711-17-D-R003 in the estimated amount of $328,000,000. This modification provides continued surface transportation coordination services for the movement of freight within the continental U.S. and Canada under the Department of Defense Freight Transportation Services program to the Defense Logistics Agency and Defense Contract Management Agency. Work will be performed in the continental U.S. and in Canada. The period of performance is from Aug. 1, 2019, to July 31, 2020. Fiscal 2019 transportation working capital funds were obligated at award. This modification brings the total cumulative face value of the contract from $110,285,829 to $438,285,829. U.S. Transportation Command, Directorate of Acquisition, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, is the contracting activity. AIR FORCE Raytheon Co., Woburn, Massachusetts, has been awarded a $36,250,251, firm-fixed-price contract modification (P00014) to previously awarded contract FA8730-17-C-0010 for the Qatar Early Warning Radar (QEWR). This modification is for procurement and storage of obsolescent spares in support of QEWR sustainment. The modification brings the total cumulative face value of the contract to $1,094,776,076. Work will be performed in Woburn, Massachusetts, and is expected to be completed by August 2023. This modification involves 100% foreign military sales to the country of Qatar. Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $36,250,251 are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, is the contracting activity. Summers Concrete Contracting Inc., Hahira, Georgia, has been awarded a ceiling $25,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for repair airfield pavements. This contract provides for repair or alteration of airport runways and taxiways construction requirements. Work will be performed at Moody Air Force Base, Valdosta, Georgia; and Sebring, Florida, and is expected to be completed by July 31, 2024. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition with three offers received. No funds are being obligated at the time of award. The 23d Contracting Squadron, Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA4830-19-D-A001). Verdis-Takisaki JV, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho (FA4620-19-D-A007); National Native American Construction Inc., Coeur d'Alene, Idaho (FA4620-19-D-A010); Global-Northcon JV, Hayden, Idaho (FA4620-19-D-A011); and Imperial Construction NW LLC, Wapato, Washington (FA4620-19-D-A012), have been awarded a combined, not-to-exceed $23,000,000 indefinite-quantity multiple award task order contract for design-build construction efforts. Work will be performed at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, and is to be expected to be complete by July 31, 2024. These awards are the result of a competitive acquisition and eight offers were received. Fiscal 2019 operation and maintenance funds in the amount of $500 are being obligated to each company at the time of award. The 92d Contracting Squadron, Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, is the contracting activity. L3 Technologies Inc., Link Training & Simulation Division, Arlington, Texas, has been awarded a $10,411,380 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract task order modification (P00011) to the previously awarded FA8621-19-6251 task order for F-16 aircraft simulator training program services. This contract modification will provide aircraft concurrency requirements for the M7.3 Operation Flight Plan to deliver medium and high-fidelity simulation capability to train pilots for the F-16 aircraft platform. The modification brings the total cumulative face value of the contract to $28,440,800. Work will be performed at Arlington, Texas, and is expected to be completed by March 31, 2021. Fiscal 2019 research and development funds in the amount of $800,000 are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, is the contract activity. University of Dayton Research Institute, College Park, Dayton, Ohio, has been awarded a $9,800,000 cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract. This contract provides enhancement and improvement to the non-destructive evaluation capabilities for aerospace structures and components. This contract promotes discovery and provides increased accuracy, precision, reliability and optimization of the material state awareness of aerospace materials. Work will be performed at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and is expected to be completed by Aug. 3, 2026. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and three offers were received. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $304,000 will be obligated at the time of award via task order 0001. The Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8650-19-D-5230). ARMY Kinder Brothers Excavating Inc.,* Dexter, Missouri (W912EQ-19-D-0009); SYTE Corp.,* Chicago, Illinois (W912EQ-19-D-0007); Randy Kinder Excavating Inc.,* Dexter, Missouri (W912EQ-19-D-0008); and C&M Contractors Inc.,* Doniphan, Missouri (W912EQ-19-D-0006), will compete for each order of the $50,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for all plant, labor, materials and equipment for construction of relief wells, repairs to existing relief wells and construction of earthen berms. Bids were solicited via the internet with four received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 20, 2024. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis, Tennessee, is the contracting activity. Sehlke Consulting LLC,* Arlington, Virginia, was awarded a $9,999,500 order-dependent contract for financial management support services. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 9, 2024. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity (W91CRB-19-A-0001). P&S Construction Inc.,* North Chelmsford, Massachusetts, was awarded a $9,457,700 firm-fixed-price contract for construction of a small arms range at Westover Air Reserve Base, Massachusetts. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Westover, Massachusetts, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 9, 2020. Fiscal 2016, 2017 and 2018 military construction funds in the amount of $9,457,700 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville, Kentucky, is the contracting activity (W912QR-19-C-0020). Nisou LGC JV LLC,* Detroit, Michigan, was awarded an $8,945,520 firm-fixed-price contract for construction of the aerial port facility at Grissom Air Reserve Base, Indiana. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Grissom, Indiana, with an estimated completion date of Oct. 12, 2020. Fiscal 2015, 2017 and 2019 military construction funds in the amount of $8,945,520 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville, Kentucky, is the contracting activity (W912QR-19-C-0026). Navistar Defense LLC, Lisle, Illinois, was awarded a $7,766,045 firm-fixed-price contract for 4x4 cargo trucks, 6x6 general transport truck, 6x6 30 ton recovery wrecker and medium tactical vehicles general transport truck spares. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work will be performed in Lisle, Illinois, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 27, 2020. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $7,766,045 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W56HZV-19-F-0455). NAVY Lockheed Martin, Mission Systems and Training, Baltimore, Maryland, is awarded $18,849,765 for cost-plus award-fee order N62786-19-F-0055 against the previously awarded basic ordering agreement N00024-15-G-2303 to provide engineering and management services for LCS-15 post shakedown availability. Lockheed Martin will provide support of the following: 62,462 man-hours level of effort; and to provide the work specification, pre-fabrication and material. Work will be performed in Moorestown, New Jersey (37%); Mayport, Florida (35%); Hampton, Virginia (14%); and Washington, District of Colombia (14%), and is expected to be complete by January 2021. Fiscal 2013 and 2019 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy); and fiscal 2019 other procurement (Navy) funding in the amount of $13,631,677 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair, Bath, Maine, is the contracting activity. BAE Systems Land & Armaments LP, Minneapolis, Minnesota, is awarded an $8,411,293 cost-plus-fixed-fee delivery order for MK38 Gun Weapon System Repair Program support. This contract action is for labor, material and services required to support the Gun Weapon System Repair Program in pre/post testing, removal/installation, refurbishment, fleet technical assistance, maintenance, training and fleet modernization of MK 38 machine gun system. Work will be performed in Norfolk, Virginia (29%); San Diego, California (27%); Yokosuka, Japan (16%); Manama, Bahrain (7%); Rota Spain (7%); Everett, Washington (4%); Tacoma, Washington (4%); Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (4%); and Pascagoula, Mississippi (2%), and is expected to be complete by September 2021. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy); and fiscal 2019 weapons procurement (Navy and Coast Guard) in the amount of $1,050,000 will be obligated at the time of award, and $750,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This delivery order was solicited as a sole source under basic ordering agreement N00174-18-G-0001 in accordance with 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1). The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division, Indian Head, Maryland, is the contracting activity (N00174-19-F-0420). Leidos Innovations Corp, Gaithersburg, Maryland, is awarded an $8,208,133 performance-based, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, firm-fixed-price contract for Micro-processor En-route Automated Radar Tracking System (MEARTS). The contract is for the acquisition of hardware, software, logistics and on-call help desk support for MEARTS. The contract includes a single five-year ordering period and one six-month option to extend services in accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Clause 52.217-8. The option period, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to an estimated $8,737,303. Work will be performed in Charleston, South Carolina, and is expected to be completed by January 2025. An order utilizing fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $605,690 will be obligated at time of award. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This requirement was not competitively procured because it is a sole-source acquisition pursuant to the authority of 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1) only one Responsible Source FAR Subpart 6.302-1). Naval Information Warfare Center Atlantic, Charleston, South Carolina, is the contracting activity (N65236-19-D-1001). EFW Inc., Fort Worth, Texas, is awarded $7,228,544 for firm-fixed-price delivery order N68335-19-F-0006 against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00019-17-G-0014). This delivery order procures 15 Fast Characterization Tools, 15 Helmet Kit Modification Fixtures, 15 Ready Room Testers and 20 Night Vision Goggle Modification Kits for the V-22 Color Helmet Mounted Display System. In addition, this delivery order provides drawing packages and the upgrade of five Fast Characterization Tools. Work will be performed in Haifa, Israel (70%); and Fort Worth, Texas (30%), and is expected to be completed in October 2020. Fiscal 2017 aircraft procurement (Air Force); and fiscal 2019 procurement defense-wide funds in the amount of $7,228,544 will be obligated at time of award, $3,496,053 of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, New Jersey, is the contracting activity. DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CoSolutions EIS JV LLC,* Sterling, Virginia, was awarded a labor hour contract (HMM402-19-F-0098) with an estimated total value of $10,000,148 to support intelligence training in Europe. Work will be performed at the Regional Joint Intelligence Training Facility at RAF Molesworth, United Kingdom; Patch Barracks, Stuttgart, Germany; and, on a temporary duty basis, at other locations in Europe and within the continental U.S. The expected completion date is July 31, 2024, if all options are exercised. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $1,713,015 are being obligated at time of award. This contract was solicited through a small business set aside and one offer was received. The Virginia Contracting Activity, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. *Small Business https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1923647/source/GovDelivery/

  • Department of Defense Selected Acquisition Reports (SARs) - December 2018

    2 août 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Department of Defense Selected Acquisition Reports (SARs) - December 2018

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has released details on major defense acquisition program cost, schedule, and performance changes since the December 2018 reporting period. This information is based on the comprehensive annual Selected Acquisition Reports (SARs) for the first quarter of FY 2019, as updated by the President's Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 budget submitted to Congress on March 11, 2019. SARs summarize the latest estimates of cost, schedule, and performance status. These reports are prepared annually in conjunction with submission of the President's Budget. Subsequent quarterly exception reports are required only for those programs experiencing unit cost increases of at least 15 percent or schedule delays of at least six months. Quarterly SARs are also submitted for initial reports, final reports, and for programs that are rebaselined at major milestone decisions. The total program acquisition cost estimates provided in the SARs include research and development, procurement, military construction, and acquisition-related operations and maintenance. These totals reflect actual costs to date as well as future anticipated costs. All estimates are shown in fully inflated then-year dollars. The prior current estimate of program acquisition costs for programs covered by SARs for the reporting period for December 2017 (83 programs) was $1,917,840 million. The current estimate for December 2018 (87 programs) is $2,018,684 million. Quantity changes account for the majority of the $101,000 million increase (+$51,000 million), in addition to scope changes (+$18,000 million) and revised indices (+$11,500 million). 16 of the 20 programs with quantity changes are either equal to or underrunning their current baseline costs, as well as 60 of the 84* SARs reporting Unit Cost this SAR cycle overall. To view the full news release and SAR Summary Tables, click here. https://dod.defense.gov/News/News-Releases/News-Release-View/Article/1923492/department-of-defense-selected-acquisition-reports-sars-december-2018/source/GovDelivery/

  • Northrop and Raytheon to compete to build laser weapon for short-range air defense

    2 août 2019 | International, Aérospatial

    Northrop and Raytheon to compete to build laser weapon for short-range air defense

    By: Jen Judson WASHINGTON — The U.S. Army has awarded a contract each to Northrop Grumman and Raytheon to build a 50-kilowatt-class laser weapon for Stryker combat vehicles for the Short-Range Air Defense (SHORAD) mission, according to an Aug. 1 statement from the service's Rapid Capabilities and Critical Technologies Office. The two companies will build their respective directed-energy weapons as subcontractors to Kord Technologies. The Rapid Capabilities and Critical Technologies Office, or RCCTO, entered into a $203 million agreement with Kord under the OTA, or other transaction authority, contracting mechanism that is used to rapidly fund the production of prototypes. The contract could increase to $490 million for the delivery of four prototypes. One of the laser weapon systems developed through the OTA could be integrated onto a platoon of four Stryker vehicles in fiscal 2022. But the Army is leaving competition open to any vendors that did not receive an OTA contract to compete using their own internal research and development dollars. The Army is rapidly developing and fielding Manuever-SHORAD vehicles in response to an urgent need in Europe. A year ago, the Army chose Leonardo DRS to integrate a mission equipment package that will include Raytheon's Stinger vehicle missile launcher onto a Stryker as its M-SHORAD capability. General Dynamics Land Systems — which produces the Stryker — will be the platform integrator for the system. The final prototypes will be delivered to the service by the first quarter of FY20. The directed-energy M-SHORAD capability will protect brigade combat teams from unmanned aircraft, helicopters, rockets, artillery and mortars. “The time is now to get directed energy weapons to the battlefield,” Lt. Gen. L. Neil Thurgood, director of hypersonics, directed energy, space and rapid acquisition, said in a statement. “The Army recognizes the need for directed energy lasers as part of the Army's modernization plan. This is no longer a research effort or a demonstration effort. It is a strategic combat capability, and we are on the right path to get it in soldiers' hands.” The award marks progress toward the Army's new strategy for accelerating and fielding directed-energy weapons. The M-SHORAD laser weapon prototypes are part of a technology maturation effort — the Multi-Mission High Energy Laser. The Army is also building a High Energy Laser Tactical Vehicle Demonstrator. While the laser for the demonstrator will be a 100-kilowatt-class laser on a Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles platform — developed by Dynetics and Lockheed Martin — the service aims to develop 250- to 300-kilowatt-class directed-energy weapons. More powerful laser weapon systems will allow the services to protect against rockets, artillery, mortars and drones “as well as more stressing threats,” according to the release. The Army plans to deliver prototypes of approximately that power onto tactical vehicles for the High Energy Laser Indirect Fire Protection Capability to a platoon by FY24. “By teaming with the other services and our industry partners, we will not only save resources, but exponentially increase the power level and get a better system to soldiers faster,” Thurgood said. https://www.defensenews.com/land/2019/08/01/northrop-and-raytheon-to-compete-to-build-laser-weapon-for-short-range-air-defense/

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