8 avril 2024 | International, Terrestre

South Korea launches second military spy satellite

South Korea’s Defense Ministry said it confirmed the satellite entered orbit and communicated with an overseas ground station after separation.

https://www.c4isrnet.com/space/2024/04/08/south-korea-launches-second-military-spy-satellite/

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  • US weapon sales boss talks China, arms exports and his agency’s future

    4 août 2020 | International, Terrestre

    US weapon sales boss talks China, arms exports and his agency’s future

    By: Aaron Mehta WASHINGTON — After years of working various jobs related to security cooperation, Lt. Gen. Charles Hooper took over the U.S. Defense Security Cooperation Agency in August 2017. It was an appointment that coincided with a major push by the Trump administration to increase weapon sales as an economic driver. Three years later, as he gets ready to retire, Hooper sat down with Defense News for an exclusive exit interview. This interview was edited for length and clarity. You came in as DSCA director in 2017, when the Trump administration was making a concerted push to increase arms sales abroad. Has that push been successful? Certainly I think the answer to that question is: “Yes, absolutely.” When I assumed responsibility at DSCA, we saw a convergence of three authorities that helped to create conditions that would help us to move forward and to elevate security cooperation. The first one was the fiscal 2017 National Defense Authorization Act, which [gave me] responsibilities in the Department of Defense to reform security cooperation, in ways that would make it more efficient and effective. The second one was the revision and the updating of the administration's arms transfer policies. And the third was the National Defense Strategy with which has three lines of effort, the second of which was strengthen alliances and attract new partners. So those three authorities created by convergence — what I call a perfect storm of authorities — and conditions to allow us to elevate and push for security cooperation and foreign military sales. And I made it my mission to take advantage of those conditions to move it forward. You have talked often about the need to both trim time and cost for partners and allies buying American systems. What are some highlights for you? In 2018, we lowered the admin surcharge rate from 3.5 to 3.2 percent. And since the new rates have gone into effect, our partners have saved $250 million on FMS cases. Next, we reduced the transportation rates in 2018. And since that reduction has gone into effect, since Aug. 15, 2018, our partners saved about $15 million. Then this year, we reduced the FMS contract administration surcharge from 1.2 percent to 1 percent. Although we don't have enough data as of yet to determine actual savings, we estimate that our allies and partners will save about 17 percent on contract administration over the life of each FMS case, which averages about seven or eight years. That perfect storm of authorities allowed us to move forward with many of the initiatives that we've been able to accomplish over my tenure as DSCA director. And then the Defense Security Cooperation University. I'm very proud of that, and we were able to bring that online in less than two years: The establishment of a civilian career field for security cooperation specialists, so that we are able to train and educate a cadre of people specifically focused on security cooperation, and foreign military sales through their mid-career and all the way to their capstone years. We all know one big FMS case can skew an entire year's numbers, but do you feel confident that enough has been done to ensure FMS sales will continue to grow? Although we tell everyone what the total value was of the cases that were implemented in that year, we think a three-year running average is a much more accurate measure of the success of FMS over time. And if you look at the three-year running average, over the past three years we're actually up around 16 percent, I believe. So the answer to your question is, yes, I think that we're still on a very positive trajectory. And I think that's the result of many of the changes that have taken place over the last three years that were made possible by the authorities that we were given. So for example, we looked at those surcharge [changes], we revised our financial collection policies to align collections with the actual anticipated billing requirements. And so by decreasing those early collections, foreign partners will experience less financial strain, aligning FMS procurement with fiscal realities. And we've also introduced new flexible financing options for our allies and partners to fit their own unique national budget and fiscal requirements. I'm very optimistic that we're going to continue to see positive trends in our foreign military sales this year, and in the years to come. The DSCA job is moving from a three-star role to a civilian job, with Heidi Grant taking over. You've often talked about the benefit of having years of relationships, going back to your younger officer days, with officers from other countries. Do you see any downside with the position being civilian? What's most important about this position is the person coming into it, and Heidi Grant has all the qualifications that you would need to be an exceptional DSCA director. She has time in combatant commands; of course time on the Air Force secretary's [staff]; her time as the director of the Defense Technology Security Administration. So it is the right person, with the right skill set, to be an upstanding director of DSCA and, frankly, I'm excited to see all the accomplishments that she's going to have. There is speculation that a potential Biden administration could roll back some of the arms control changes made under the Trump administration. If that were to happen, what would be the impact? I'm not going to hypothesize here about what ifs. What I can say is that we're clearly on a very positive trajectory as a result of the three steps that have taken place. And I think that the results that have come forward — I mean, the results that we've seen today are a reflection of the NDAA, the conventional arms transfer policies and National Defense Strategy. Future administrations will of course consider things as they will consider them. And I wouldn't want to speculate on that. But I think the progress we've made today speaks very, very strongly toward the effectiveness of the measures in place. We hear a lot about Russia and China looking at foreign arms sales as a way to exert influence around the globe. Are they successful in pushing the U.S. out of certain markets? Both of our main strategic competitors are mounting challenges to the United States, and I think we see that in a number of places all over the world. But I would say that the proper characterization of this is that they are challenging us. They are competing with us. Certainly they've mounted challenges around the world and in providing goods and services that are not quite the quality of the United States, trying to replace the United States as the partner of choice. Whether it's been successful or not, I think that we have recognized that they've mounted this challenge and we've taken some of the steps that I've articulated for you here that we've done to ensure that we remain the partner of choice and that we complicate their efforts to compete with us. In addition to providing partners with the hardware, our approach ensures that we strengthen these institutions — logistics, doctrine, infrastructure, institutional support, financial management — so that they can learn how to pay the people who will actually fix the equipment. And this is what makes our approach so unique. And this is why we will win this great power competition. Our values set us apart from the other great power competitors. You were the defense attache to the embassy in Beijing for two years, and obviously have a view on China's efforts from your current spot. How do you asses the country's defense export capacity? Certainly, the Chinese are going to look across the spectrum, but certainly they're looking in areas where they think they can challenge us. We know, of course, that the Chinese have marketed UAVs and other things. So they'll look for market niches in areas where they think they can be competitive with the United States. They have economic reasons for doing so, as well as strategic reasons for doing so. But once again, their approach stops at the point of sale. And this is the inherent weakness in their approach and the inherent strength in our approach. Do you think UAVs will be the main area that China targets? No. I used that solely as one example. We've seen attempts by the Chinese to compete across the spectrum, from small arms, small missile sets and others all the way up to more sophisticated equipment such as UAVs and others. We've seen a comprehensive effort by the Chinese to compete across the spectrum of defense articles and services. And I think we've seen a comprehensive effort on their part to try and market systems that replicate U.S. systems and U.S. capabilities across the spectrum, from small arms through artillery systems and other things. So I think we have to be vigilant across the spectrum of defense articles and services to where the Chinese are probing. I think the Chinese will generally try to press forward in areas where they sense that the U.S. position is perhaps a bit weaker, and they will push forward in those areas. And I think rather than having a strategy of competing in any particular sector of defense articles and services, I think that they're more interested in trying to compete across the spectrum, where what they perceive to be potential areas where they might be able to make some advances, and moving forward in those. In what areas is the U.S. potentially vulnerable, and are those where the U.S. needs to increase sales? I don't look at it that way. Defense exports are driven by a rapidly evolving security environment and emerging threats. And so we can't really predict this system or that system, or this category of systems. That said, we know what our military leaders are saying: that [the capabilities] they need in the field to ensure our strategic and operational edge [is what] our allies and partners will want as we move into the more modern areas of conflict. In the past, there was a lag between when the United States would introduce a system and when our allies and partners would ask for us to export it, and those days are behind us. We're in a world where interoperability is the key to success, and we cannot afford to have delays in when we introduce new technology and when we consider exporting them. Now, there are inherent challenges here, between conducting the cost-benefit analysis of risk versus gain, but we have the talent and the ability to rapidly assess these, and to move forward and provide our partners their defense articles and services that they want and that they need, and that will make them better allies and partners for the United States. So rather than predict any particular segment, I would say that the steps that we're taking to improve our overall approach will ensure that whatever the evolution of systems and the evolution of threats is, we will be able to respond and react quickly, and work with our allies and partners to provide them those defense articles and services in a timely fashion. Both the commercial and defense industries are investing heavily in new technologies, including artificial intelligence, which can be tricky to export. How does this work going forward? That's a great question. And I'll tell you, early this year I took a visit out to Silicon Valley and Stanford, and had an opportunity to talk to some of the people out there. Ever since I came back from that trip, I've been thinking about this question and related questions. And, to be honest with you, I think we've yet to determine — we know that this will be one of the principal challenges for security cooperation moving forward. We absolutely know this. And I'm confident that we're thinking deeply about this because I've had this discussion with my colleagues and others. I don't have any solutions for you right now. But I think we've all come to the conclusion that the rapid evolution of technology is going to require us to conduct risk assessments and cost-benefit analysis more quickly, without sacrificing the due diligence necessary to determine the relative cost and benefits of whether or not we want to move forward with [exporting] a certain technology. We all recognize that we have a challenge to come together and determine how we will move forward in the security cooperation realm to address space, cyber, artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies. Should there be a hard and fast rule for whether technology like AI can be exported, given its nature? Listen, never ever forget that security cooperation is a policy function at its core. That's why DSCA resides in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy. And policy is a process of adjudicating on a case-by-case basis, based upon a number of economic, diplomatic and political factors, as well as the right steps to take to secure the security of the United States. Just as security cooperation now is a case-by-case consideration of a number of factors, I don't see why, as the technology evolves, it would be any different. All of this, everything we do, is on a case-by-case basis because our national security is predicated on a comprehensive assessment of the situation as it exists, the factors impacted on that situation and the ramifications of a decision for the security of the United States. https://www.defensenews.com/interviews/2020/08/03/us-weapon-sales-boss-talks-china-arms-exports-and-his-agencys-future/

  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - September 13, 2019

    16 septembre 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - September 13, 2019

    ARMY Raytheon Co., McKinney, Texas, was awarded a $427,298,588 hybrid (cost-plus-fixed-fee and firm-fixed-price) contract for procurement of Common Sensor Payload systems, spare parts and engineering and system support services. One bid was were solicited with one bid received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 12, 2024. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity (W56KGY-19-D-0005). Honeywell International Inc., Phoenix, Arizona, was awarded a $46,965,295 firm-fixed-price contract for overhaul and repair of the T55-GA-714A engine. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work will be performed in Phoenix, Arizona, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2020. Fiscal 2010 Army working capital funds in the amount of $46,965,295 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-19-C-0051). Oshkosh Defense LLC, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, was awarded a $24,397,228 modification (P00261) to contract W56HZV-15-C-0095 to provide total package fielding for the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle. Work will be performed in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, with an estimated completion date of Oct. 30, 2020. Fiscal 2019 other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $24,397,228 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity. Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Co. LLC, Oak Brook, Illinois, was awarded a $15,577,450 firm-fixed-price contract for maintenance dredging. Bids were solicited via the internet with four received. Work will be performed in Saint Marys, Georgia, with an estimated completion date of April 15, 2020. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $15,580,450 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville, Florida, is the contracting activity (W912EP-19-C-0029). Pontchartrain Partners LLC,* New Orleans, Louisiana, was awarded a $9,956,700 firm-fixed-price contract for mobilization and demobilization, clearing and grubbing, stripping, containment dike construction, interior and semi-compacted berm construction, demolition and construction of drop-outlet structure, turfing, and as-built drawings. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Corpus Christi, Texas, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2020. Fiscal 2019 civil construction funds in the amount of $9,956,700 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Galveston, Texas, is the contracting activity (W912HY-19-C-0016). PAF Electrical Inc., Portland, Oregon, was awarded a $7,393,100 firm-fixed-price contract for the delivery of four generator step up power transformers and accessories to Fort Randall power plant in Pickstown, South Dakota. Bids were solicited via the internet with eight received. Work will be performed in Pickstown, South Dakota, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 31, 2023. Fiscal 2019 civil construction funds in the amount of $7,393,100 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha, Nebraska, is the contracting activity (W9128F-19-C-0035). DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Philips Healthcare Informatics Inc., Pleasanton, California, has been awarded a maximum $400,000,000 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for digital imaging network picture archiving communications system products and maintenance. This was a competitive acquisition with ten offers received. This is the seventh contract competitively awarded under the open solicitation, SPE2D1-15-R-0004. This is a five-year base contract with one five-year option period. Locations of performance are California, and other areas located within and outside the continental U.S., with a Sept. 12, 2024, performance completion date. Using customers are Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and federal civilian agencies. Type of appropriation is fiscal year 2019 through 2024 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE2D1-19-D-0036). Science Applications International Corp., Fairfield, New Jersey, has been awarded a maximum $92,000,000 firm-fixed-price, 15-month bridge contract for facilities maintenance, repair and operations items. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. Locations of performance are Hawaii, Guam and New Jersey, with a Dec. 14, 2020, performance completion date. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2020 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE8E3-19-D0015). AJ Wholesale Produce Inc.,* Sheboygan, Wisconsin, has been awarded a maximum $48,600,000 firm-fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for fresh fruits and vegetables. This was a competitive acquisition with four responses received. This is a 54-month contract with no option periods. Locations of performance are Michigan and Wisconsin, with a March 9, 2024, performance completion date. Using customers are Department of Agriculture schools and Reservations. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2024 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE300-19-D-S734). Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, has been awarded a minimum $42,838,512 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-quantity contract for the manufacture of B-2 hot trailing edge production units. This is a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a four-year base contract with one five-year option period. Locations of performance are Oklahoma, Ohio, Missouri, and California, with an Oct. 1, 2024, performance completion date. Using military service is Air Force. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma (SPRTA1-19-D-0001). Moog Inc., Elma, New York, has been awarded a maximum $41,773,400 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for aviation cylinder assemblies. This was a competitive acquisition with one offer received. This is a five-year contract with no option periods. Location of performance is New York, with a Sept. 1, 2024, performance completion date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2024 Army working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama (SPRRA1-19-D-0121). Raytheon Co., Andover, Massachusetts, has been awarded a maximum $23,774,837 firm-fixed-price contract for traveling wave tubes. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a one-time procurement contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Massachusetts, with a Jan. 31, 2023, performance completion date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 Army working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama (SPRRA1-18-C-0061). AIR FORCE ITility LLC, Herndon, Virginia (FA5641-19-DA-006); ValidaTek Inc., McLean, Virginia (FA5641-19-DA-007); and CAE USA Mission Solutions Inc., Tampa, Florida (FA5641-19-DA-008), have been awarded a $95,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for advisory and assistance services. This contract provides for technical and analytical services to support and improve policy development, decision making, management, administration, and systems operation. Work will be performed primarily at Headquarters U.S. Air Forces in Europe (USAFE), USAFE bases, USAFE geographically separated units, U.S. European Command, U.S. Africa Command, and U.S. Army in Europe, including Installation Management Command and is expected to be completed by Sept. 12, 2026. This contract is the result of a competitive acquisition and eleven offers received. Fiscal 2019 operation and maintenance funds in the amount of $2,500 are being obligated for each awardee at the time of the award. The 764th Specialized Contracting Squadron, Ramstein Air Base, Germany, is the contracting activity. Rand and Jones Enterprises Co., Inc., Buffalo, New York, has been awarded a $9,500,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for a Simplified Acquisition of Base Engineering Requirements (SABER) contract for completion of minor, non-complex construction projects requiring minimum design. This contract consists of a number of general construction disciplines including, but not limited to, plumbing, masonry, electrical, mechanical, carpentry, architectural, painting and HVAC. Work will be performed at Rome, Newport and Stockbridge, New York, and is expected to be completed by Sept. 12, 2024. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and one offer was received. Fiscal 2019 research and development funds will be used and no funds are being obligated at the time of the award. The Air Force Research Laboratory Specialized Acquisition & Operational Contracting Branch, Rome, New York, is the contracting activity. NAVY Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Herndon, Virginia, is awarded a $57,462,554 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to a previously awarded contract N00024-17-C-6327 to exercise options for engineering support services for the Joint Counter Radio-Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare Increment One Block One (I1B1) Systems full-rate production in support of the Expeditionary Warfare program office. This option exercise is for Engineering Support Services for Joint Counter Radio-Controlled Improvised Explosive Device Electronic Warfare (JCREW) to introduce new technologies; address diminishing material and depot repairs to keep JCREW systems viable for future production; and maintain operational readiness for the field. Work will be performed in San Diego, California, and is expected to be complete by September 2020. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test, and evaluation funding in the amount of $2,971,124; and 2019 other procurement (Navy) funding in the amount of $1,406,871 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. American Petroleum Tankers LLC, Blue Bell, Pennsylvania, is awarded a $31,548,000 modification under a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract N62387-15-C-5405 to fund the fourth one-year option period. The option will continue to provide one U.S. flagged Jones Act tanker (M/T Empire State), for the transportation of petroleum product in support of the Defense Logistics Agency–Energy in accordance with the terms of the charter. The vessel is capable of deployment to worldwide locations. The current contract includes a one-year firm period of performance, three one-year option periods and one 11-month final option period. Work will be performed worldwide, and is expected to be completed by Aug. 20, 2020. The option will be funded by transportation working capital funds for fiscal 2019 and 2020. Military Sealift Command, headquartered in Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (N62387-15-C-5405). University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, is awarded an $11,882,737 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract, which includes one unexercised option task valued at $792,524, for the statement of work, "Backbone Components of an Arctic Mobile Observing System: seagliders, floats, SA and C2." Work will be performed in Seattle, Washington, and is expected to be completed September 2024. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test, and evaluation (Navy) funds for $1,839,015 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at end of current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured under N00014-19-S-B001, entitled "Long Range Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) for Navy and Marine Corps Science & Technology." Since proposals will be received throughout the year under the long range BAA, the number of proposals received in response to the solicitation is unknown. The Office of Naval Research, Arlington, Virginia, is the contracting activity (N00014-19-C-2076). DEFENSE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AGENCY Iridium Government Services LLC., Tempe, Arizona, was awarded a non-competitive, firm-fixed price contract on Sept. 13, 2019, for unlimited access to Iridium's global commercial satellite network for enhanced mobile satellite airtime communication services. The original solicitation was issued on the basis of other than full and open competition pursuant to 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1), only one responsible source and no other type of supplies or services would satisfy agency requirements. The face value of this action is $16,666,666 funded by fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The total cumulative face value of the contract is $738,500,000. Performance will be at the contractor's facility. The period of performance is seven years, from Sept. 15, 2019, through Sept. 14, 2026. The Defense Information Technology Contracting Organization, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, is the contracting activity (HC1013-19-C-0006). DEFENSE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY Exquadrum Inc., Adelanto, California, has been awarded a $9,810,053 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification (P00003) exercising the option period on previously awarded HR0011-18-C-0138 for a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency research program. Fiscal 2019 research and development funds in the amount of $2,400,000 are being obligated at the time of award. Work will be performed in Adelanto, California (58%); and Huntsville, Alabama (42%), with an estimated completion date of August 2020. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Arlington, Virginia, is the contracting activity. U.S. TRANSPORTATION COMMAND JAR Assets LLC, Mandeville, Louisiana, has been awarded a contract modification, P00026, on contract HTC711-16-C-W001 in the estimated amount of $8,869,099. This modification provides continued transportation of bulk jet fuel and marine diesel fuel by tug and barge for the Defense Logistics Agency. Work will be performed at ports and points along the inland waterways and Gulf Coast locations in the Gulf Region. The option period of performance is from Oct. 1, 2019, to Sept. 30, 2020. Fiscal 2020 defense working capital funds will be obligated at the start of performance. This modification brings the total cumulative estimated face value of the contract from $35,011,884 to $43,880,983. U.S. Transportation Command, Directorate of Acquisition, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, is the contracting activity. *Small Business https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Contracts/Contract/Article/1960562/source/GovDelivery/

  • Discovery Air Defence Flies First Fast Jet Training Mission in Australia

    15 novembre 2017 | International, Aérospatial

    Discovery Air Defence Flies First Fast Jet Training Mission in Australia

    Montreal, November 14, 2017 – Discovery Air Defence Services Inc. (“DA Defence”), a wholly owned subsidiary of Discovery Air Inc., today announced that it has now flown its first fast jet training mission in support of the Australian Defence Force's Fast Jet Trial contract. Two DA Defence upgraded Alpha Jets and four Air Affairs Learjets participated in air-to-air missions as Red Air aggressors near RAAF Williamtown, New South Wales. The jets were participating in the Royal Australian Air Force 81 Wing workups for future exercises. “This inaugural fast jet mission is a great milestone for everyone involved in our new Australian program,” said Steven “Bunt” Nierlich, DA Defence Program Manager and a highly-experienced former CF-18 pilot. “Discovery Air Defence and Air Affairs Australia are committed to delivering the world's best adversary training to the Australian Defence Force.” “This mission marks the achievement of initial operating capability (IOC) in our Australian fast jet program,” said Paul Bouchard, President of DA Defence. “Working closely with our partner Air Affairs Australia, also an expert in providing both jet and unmanned target services, we look forward to training the Australian Defence Force with highly-representative adversary threats beyond this trial and into the future.” DA Defence is the most experienced provider of turnkey tactical airborne training in the world. With eight Main Operating Bases across three continents, DA Defence operates the world's largest privately-owned fleet of aggressor and combat support aircraft. With an unparalleled safety record, including 66,000 accident-free flight hours, DA Defence, along with their wholly-owned U.S. subsidiary, Top Aces Corp., is the exclusive contracted airborne training service provider to the Canadian, German, and Australian armed forces. DA Defence's unique mix of modern fighter and special mission aircraft equipped with representative 4th generation threat capabilities delivers the mission profiles, flexibility, and availability demanded by the world's leading air forces. About DA Defence and Discovery Air DA Defence and its U.S. subsidiary, Top Aces Corp., have the world's largest privately-held operating fleet of fighter aircraft. The training provided supports the operational readiness of both current and future generation fighter aircraft. Discover more on how DA Defence is changing the face of air combat training at experiencematters.ca. #CdnInnovation #AeroInnovates Discovery Air Inc. is a global leader in specialty aviation services. We deliver exceptional air combat training; medevac equipped aircraft services; air charter services; helicopter operations; and transport and logistics support to ensure operational readiness, health, safety, and vital lifelines for our clients and the communities we serve. Discovery Air's unsecured convertible debentures trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange (symbol DA.DB.A). For Further Information: Garrick Ngai Director of Marketing Garrick.Ngai@discoveryair.com 514-694-5565 http://www.discoveryair-ds.com/page?a=2082&lang=fr-CA

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