3 mai 2021 | Local, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

Opinion | The Saturday Debate: Should Canada leave NATO?

Opinion | The Saturday Debate: Should Canada leave NATO?

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization was created to contain the Soviet Union, which no longer exists, but now it seems designed to supply the milita...

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/contributors/the-saturday-debate/2021/05/01/the-saturday-debate-should-canada-leave-nato.html

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  • Federal auditor general to dive into contentious fighter-jet 'capability gap'

    2 août 2018 | Local, Aérospatial

    Federal auditor general to dive into contentious fighter-jet 'capability gap'

    Study will also look at how Canada will meet its 'obligations as it transitions to a new fighter fleet' Lee Berthiaume Canada's auditor general has started to dig into one of the Trudeau government's most contentious claims, upon which rests the fate of hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars: that the country is facing an urgent shortage of fighter jets. The claim was first made in November 2016 when the Liberals announced that Canada didn't have enough fighter jets to defend North America and simultaneously meet the country's NATO commitments, and that a stopgap was urgently needed until the entire CF-18 fleet could be replaced. The government originally planned to buy 18 interim Super Hornets from Boeing for $6.4 billion before the deal was scuttled late last year in favour of buying 25 used jets from Australia for $500 million. But critics, including opposition parties and former air force commanders, accuse the government of fabricating an urgent "capability gap" — as the shortfall is known — by changing the military's requirements to avoid having to buy the F-35 stealth fighter. Auditor general Michael Ferguson is now scrutinizing this "capability gap" as part of an overall fighter-jet review, according to an internal memo written by officials at the federal procurement department and obtained by The Canadian Press through access to information legislation. The memo to Public Services and Procurement Canada deputy minister Marie Lemay references a meeting with Ferguson's staff in December in which they laid out the objectives of their audit. Full article: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/auditor-general-fighter-jets-1.4763444

  • Government checks another box on the long, long road to building a Polar icebreaker

    2 mars 2020 | Local, Naval

    Government checks another box on the long, long road to building a Polar icebreaker

    David Pugliese, Ottawa Citizen The federal government is requesting information from industry on which shipyard has the capability to build the Canadian Coast Guard’s new Polar Class icebreaker. It’s a strange request in some respects. Last year the Liberal government took away the Polar Class icebreaker project from Seaspan shipyards on the west coast and instead provided that company with a deal that will see it build 16 new Multi-Purpose Vessels for the Canadian Coast Guard. Irving on the east coast is running at full speed handling the combat ship portions of the National Shipbuilding Strategy. It has already fallen behind on the delivery of the first of the Arctic and Offshore Patrol Ships and it still has much work to do on the Canadian Surface Combatant program. It was expected that Davie, the largest shipyard in Canada, would receive the contract to build the Polar Class icebreaker. Yet the news release issued Friday from Public Services and Procurement Canada noted that, “the Government of Canada issued a Request for Information (RFI), open to all Canadian shipyards, seeking information on domestic shipyard capability and capacity to construct and deliver a Polar-class icebreaker. This follows standard procurement practices, and the information gathered will help the government determine how best to proceed so that the polar icebreaker is delivered in the most timely and efficient manner.” Companies, however, only have two weeks to respond to the request for information. The whole exercise has the feel of a government checking the boxes off before awarding the contract to Davie. Or it could be a measure to head off any legal challenge from other shipyards who would complain that a “fair, open and transparent” competition was not run. Cecely Roy, press secretary to Procurement Minister Anita Anand, said in an email to this newspaper that as “a significant amount of time has passed since the last commissioned studies on the capacity of domestic shipyards, this RFI was initiated to provide updated information to inform the government’s decisions on the procurement process moving forward.” The polar icebreaker, the future Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) John G. Diefenbaker, will replace Canada’s current largest icebreaker, the CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent. The current fleet of heavy icebreakers, including the CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent, remain in good condition and will be in operation until the polar icebreaker is delivered, according to the federal government. The Polar Class project was announced by the Conservative government in 2008 and has faced delays ever since. The ship had been expected to be in service in 2017. That date changed to 2021. Now there is no known date for the vessel to be operating. “The delivery date for the polar icebreaker will be identified as the project gets underway,” the federal government added in its news release. “At this stage, we are exploring options to ensure the Polar Icebreaker is built in the most efficient manner to meet the needs of the Coast Guard, but a decision was not been made on the contract award, nor will this RFI result in that decision,” Roy said in an email to this newspaper. https://www.thechronicleherald.ca/news/canada/government-checks-another-box-on-the-long-long-road-to-building-a-polar-icebreaker-417217/

  • CAE GmbH awarded subcontract to upgrade training capabilities for German Eurofighter

    17 juillet 2020 | Local, Aérospatial

    CAE GmbH awarded subcontract to upgrade training capabilities for German Eurofighter

    Stolberg, Germany, July 16, 2020 -  CAE today announced that CAE GmbH has been awarded a subcontract from Airbus Defence and Space to support the development of new and upgraded training capabilities for Germany’s Eurofighter program. Airbus, acting as the prime contractor for the Eurofighter Pilot Synthetic Training System (PSTS) consortium in Germany, awarded the subcontract to CAE GmbH to support the development of two new Eurofighter full-mission simulators and an upgrade of two existing simulators at the main operating base in Laage. Specifically, CAE will have responsibility for providing the CAE Medallion-6000 visual system and synthetic environment solution for the Eurofighter simulators. “We are pleased to collaborate with Airbus to continue our longstanding support of the German Air Force Eurofighter training program,” said Niels Kröning, General Manager, CAE GmbH.  “The new Eurofighter simulators in Laage will expand the distributed mission training capabilities for the German Air Force and enable more advanced training to be conducted in the simulators.” The Eurofighter Pilot Synthetic Training System consortium is the result of a collaboration between the German and Spanish Ministries of Defence. Airbus Defence and Space acts as the prime contractor with CAE and Indra included as industry partners. CAE GmbH also provides on-site maintenance and in-service support services at Laage, Neuburg, Wittmund, and Noervenich, which are the four Eurofighter main operating bases in Germany. About CAE CAE’s Defence & Security business unit focuses on helping prepare our customers to develop and maintain the highest levels of mission readiness.  We are a world-class training and mission systems integrator offering a comprehensive portfolio of training and operational support solutions across the air, land, sea and public safety market segments.  We serve our global defence and security customers through regional operations in Canada; the United States/Latin America; Europe/Middle East; and Asia-Pacific, all of which leverage the full breadth of CAE’s capabilities, technologies and solutions. CAE is a global leader in training for the civil aviation, defence and security, and healthcare markets. Backed by a record of more than 70 years of industry firsts, we continue to help define global training standards with our innovative virtual-to-live training solutions to make flying safer, maintain defence force readiness and enhance patient safety. We have the broadest global presence in the industry, with over 10,500 employees, 160 sites and training locations in over 35 countries. Each year, we train more than 220,000 civil and defence crewmembers, including more than 135,000 pilots, and thousands of healthcare professionals worldwide. www.cae.com      Follow us on Twitter @CAE_Inc and @CAE_Defence   View source version on CAE: https://www.cae.com/news-events/press-releases/cae-gmbh-awarded-subcontract-to-upgrade-training-capabilities-for-german-eurofighter

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