2 avril 2024 | International, Naval

Naval Group and PT PAL have signed a contract with Indonesia for 2 locally built Scorpène® Evolved Full LiB submarines

In accordance with the Defence Cooperation Agreement signed between the governments of France and Indonesia in August 2021, the Indonesian authorities have chosen Naval Group and PT PAL for their...

https://www.epicos.com/article/794738/naval-group-and-pt-pal-have-signed-contract-indonesia-2-locally-built-scorpener

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  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - August 19, 2019

    20 août 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - August 19, 2019

    ARMY Norfolk Dredging Co., Chesapeake, Virginia, was awarded a $133,162,809 firm-fixed-price contract for Savannah inner harbor dredging. Bids were solicited via the internet with four received. Work will be performed in Savannah, Georgia, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 6, 2021. Fiscal 2019 civil construction; operations and maintenance civil; and river and harbor contributed funds in the amount of $133,162,809 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah, Georgia, is the contracting activity (W912HN-19-C-5004). Norfolk Dredging Co., Chesapeake, Virginia, was awarded a $124,460,600 firm-fixed-price contract for Charleston harbor dredging. Bids were solicited via the internet with five received. Work will be performed in Charleston, South Carolina, with an estimated completion date of July 5, 2022. Fiscal 2019 civil construction funds in the amount of $124,460,600 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Charleston, South Carolina, is the contracting activity (W912HP-19-C-0003). WHH Nisqually-Garco JV 2,* Olympia, Washington, was awarded a $22,252,000 firm-fixed-price contract for construction of a hot refueling system at Gray Army Airfield at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. Bids were solicited via the internet with three received. Work will be performed in Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, with an estimated completion date of Feb. 22, 2021. Fiscal 2019 military construction funds in the amount of $22,252,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle, Washington, is the contracting activity (W912DW-19-C-0017). L3 Technologies Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah, was awarded a $7,868,630 firm-fixed-price contract for the production of Dual Output Battery Eliminator retrofits and Ku Band Directional Antennas On the Move upgrades. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work will be performed in Salt Lake City, Utah, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 31, 2021. Fiscal 2019 aircraft procurement, Army funds in the amount of $7,868,630 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-19-F-0636). AIR FORCE Radiance Technologies Inc., Huntsville, Alabama,* has been awarded a $99,997,251 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for distributed, automated and intelligent hardware and software security. The scope of this effort is the design, development, integration and delivery of an adaptable set of models and tools, which can be used to provide next-generation detailed, comprehensive and automated cyber vulnerability assessment capabilities, which can also be tailored towards multiple application spaces and Department of Defense missions. This set of models and tools will provide optimized system configurations and countermeasure placement in order to perform vulnerability assessments on complex, distributed systems, which include Internet of Things components in an automated fashion. Work will be performed in Huntsville, Alabama, and is expected to be completed by Aug. 19, 2024. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and two offers were received. The Air Force Research Laboratory, Rome, New York, is the contracting activity (FA8750-19-C-1508). Flatter Inc., Fredericksburg, Virginia, and Washington, District of Columbia, has been awarded a $39,559,613 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for the Air Force Senior Leadership Development Program (AFSLDP). This contract provides for the full range of technical, functional and managerial expertise to further support the continual development, enhancement, sustainment and facilitation of the AFSLDP by providing analysis, subject matter expertise, guidance and support to the Force Development and Senior Leadership trainings as well as systems. Work will be performed in the National Capital Region and the estimated completion date is Aug. 16, 2024. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and six offers were received. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $136,000 are being obligated at the time of award. The contracting directorate is Air Force, District of Washington, Acquisitions, and the contracting activity is Joint Base Andrews, Maryland (FA701419DA003). BAE Systems, Nashua, New Hampshire, has been awarded a $19,197,676 cost-plus-fixed-fee for sustainment services associated with the AN/ALQ-239 Digital Electronics Warfare Systems (DEWS) and AN/AAR-57A(V) Common Missile Warning System (CMWS) hardware/software. This contract provides for the repair and return indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity in support of DEWS/CMWS line replaceable units and line replaceable modules for the Foreign Military Sales customer. Work will be performed at Nashua, New Hampshire, and is expected to be completed by Aug. 13, 2022. This contract involves foreign military sales to the Royal Saudi Air Force. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $9,054,261 are being obligated at the time of the award via order FA8523-19-F-0056. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Robins Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA8523-19-D-0001). CORRECTION: The Aug. 8, 2019, announcement that BAE Systems Technology Solutions & Services Inc., Rockville, Maryland, was awarded a $369,000,000 ceiling increase modification (P00013) to contract FA2521-16-D-0010 for serviceable components and subsystems for instrumentation tracking systems is incorrect. The correct award amount was $90,500,000. All other information in the announcement is correct. NAVY Lockheed Martin Corp., Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, is awarded $32,111,547 for modification P00005 to delivery order N00019-19-F-2512 under previously issued against basic ordering agreement (N00019-14-G-0020). This award procures modification kits and special tooling for modification and retrofit of delivered F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters for the Air Force, Marine Corps, Navy, non-Department of Defense (DoD) participants and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) customers. Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas, and is expected to be completed in June 2025. Fiscal 2019 aircraft procurement (Air Force, Marine Corps, and Navy); non-DoD partners; and FMS funds in the amount of $32,111,547 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This modification combines purchases for the Air Force ($16,510,522; 51%); Marine Corps ($7,693,130; 24%); Navy ($275,849; 1%); non-DoD participants ($4,698,676; 15%); and FMS customers ($2,933,370; 9%). The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Detyens Shipyards Inc., North Charleston, South Carolina, is awarded a $21,316,067 firm-fixed-price contract for a 75-calendar day shipyard availability for the regular overhaul and dry-docking of USNS Sacagawea (T-AKE 2). The contract includes options, which, if exercised, would bring the total contract value to $21,942,075. Work will be performed in North Charleston, South Carolina, and is expected to be completed by Dec. 20, 2019. Working capital funds (Navy) in the amount of $21,942,075 will be obligated in fiscal 2020. This contract was competitively procured with proposals solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with two offers received. The Navy's Military Sealift Command, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (N32205-19-C-6006). Reyes Construction Inc., Pomona, California, is awarded $20,368,000 for firm-fixed-price task order N62473-19-F-4995 under a previously awarded multiple award construction contract (N62473-18-D-5862) for the design-bid-build construction of missile magazines at Naval Weapons Station, Seal Beach. The work to be performed provides for new magazines that are needed to provide adequate storage for vertical launch missile systems, missile variants and for assembled missile storage. The contractor shall provide all labor, supervision, materials and equipment to perform all work described in the request for proposal. The task order also contains five unexercised options, which, if exercised, would increase the cumulative task order value to $20,479,300. Work will be performed in Seal Beach, California, and is expected to be completed by April 2021. Fiscal 2019 military construction (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $20,368,000 are obligated on this award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. One proposal was received for this task order. Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Southwest, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity. The Lockheed Martin Corp., Rotary and Mission Systems, Mitchel Field, New York, is awarded $13,350,351 for cost-plus-incentive-fee modification P00008 for new scope under previously awarded contract N-00030-19-C-0045 to provide U.S. Trident II (D5) Strategic Weapon System efforts for the navigation subsystem. Work will be performed in Mitchel Field, New York, with an expected completion date of Dec. 31, 2022. Fiscal 2019 other procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $13,350,351 are being obligated on this award. Funds will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was a sole-source acquisition pursuant to 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1). Strategic Systems Programs, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. Lockheed Martin Corp., Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, is awarded $12,031,145 for modification P00001 to delivery order 5503 under previously issued against basic ordering agreement (N00019-14-G-0020). This award procures modification kits for modification and retrofit of delivered F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighters for the Air Force and Marine Corps. Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas, and is expected to be completed in December 2021. Fiscal 2019 aircraft procurement (Air Force and Marine Corps) funds in the amount of $12,031,145 will be obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This modification combines purchases for the Air Force ($6,927,023; 58%); and the Marine Corps ($5,104,122; 42%). The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Unified Business Technologies Inc.,* Troy, Michigan, is awarded $7,379,877 for firm-fixed-price task order N40085-19-F-3500 under a previously awarded SeaPort Next Generation contract for engineering and program management for capital improvement requirements with various design and construction periods at Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina; and Marine Base Camp Lejeune, Jacksonville, North Carolina. The work to be performed provides for various construction engineering disciplines and administrative support services to assist in completing various capital improvement projects. The task order also contains four unexercised options, which, if exercised, would increase cumulative task order value to $37,651,276. Work will be performed in Jacksonville, North Carolina (67%); and Havelock, North Carolina (33%), and is expected to be completed by August 2024. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) contract funds in the amount of $7,379,877 are obligated on this award and will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Three proposals were received for this task order. Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Mid-Atlantic, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (N00178-19-D-8762). DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Bremen-Bowdon Investments Co., Bowdon, Georgia, has been awarded a maximum $7,966,345 modification (P00008) exercising the second one-year option period of a one-year base contract (SPE1C1-17-D-1085) with four one-year option periods for men's blue trousers. This is a firm-fixed-price contract. Location of performance is Georgia, with an Aug. 23, 2020, performance completion date. Using military service is Air Force. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2020 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. *Small Business https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Contracts/Contract/Article/1938044/source/GovDelivery/

  • The case for a defense budget that focuses more on China, less on climate change

    23 juin 2021 | International, Terrestre

    The case for a defense budget that focuses more on China, less on climate change

    Two House Republican leaders argue that with the Pentagon's new budget request, you can almost hear the laughter of the United States' adversaries.

  • Did F-35 Testing for Extreme Weather Conditions Fall Short?

    21 juin 2019 | International, Aérospatial

    Did F-35 Testing for Extreme Weather Conditions Fall Short?

    By Oriana Pawlyk SALON DU BOURGET, PARIS -- More than 400 F-35 Joint Strike Fighters are operating from 17 bases worldwide. From the near-Arctic region of Ørland, Norway, to a recent deployment in the Middle East, the fifth-generation jet is expanding its reach. But a recent news report shows that weather conditions have some effect on the Pentagon's stealthy fifth-gen fighter, raising concerns about its performance in extreme climate locations. In a recent Defense News report series, the outlet obtained documents showing that cold weather triggered a battery sensor in an F-35 Lightning II in Alaska. While the battery was not affected, the weather "overwhelm[ed] the battery heater blanket" that protects it, prompting the sensor to issue a warning and causing the pilot to abort his mission and land immediately, Defense News said. "We have already developed an update to the software and the battery's heater control system to resolve this issue, and this updated software is available for users today to load on their aircraft in the event they will be conducting extreme cold weather operations," Greg Ulmer, vice president of Lockheed's F-35 aircraft production business, said in an interview with Military.com at the Paris Air Show, adding the update will be in new planes by 2021. The U.S. military anticipated taking the Lockheed Martin-made F-35 around the world, with partners and allies flying the plane in both hot and cold regions, including some that are changing. "The [F-22 Raptor] and plenty of other aircraft have flown out [to Alaska] just fine for decades," Rebecca Grant of IRIS Independent Research told Defense News. Grant is a former director of the Mitchell Institute for Airpower Studies at the Air Force Association. "The F-35 should have had all that sorted out in the climatic lab." Ulmer, however, said all necessary steps were taken in lab testing, and the issue identified was a normal part of the design and development process. "You do the best you can relative to the engineering, understanding of the environment, to design the part. And then you actually perform, and [you realize] your model was off a little bit, so you have to tweak the design ... to account for it," Ulmer said. An F-35A from Hill Air Force Base, Utah, was on static display here during the show. "We're confident in the F-35s performance in all weather conditions," he said. The battery issue was first discovered during extreme cold weather testing at -30 degrees and below at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, in February 2018, he added. Ulmer explained there are various tests points done before the plane heads to the McKinley Lab at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, for robust experiments. The lab is responsible for high-range weather testing of military and commercial aircraft, munitions and weapons. The lab's refrigeration chamber can go as low as -70 degrees, lab chief Dwayne Bell told Military.com during a visit to the facility in 2017. He said at the time that the F-35 program had been one of the most expensive programs tested in the lab to date. There's a wide range of testing costs, but they average roughly $25,000 a day, he said. It cost about $7 million to test the Marine Corps' B-model from the Patuxent River Integrated Test Force, Maryland, over a six-month period, Bell said. The Lightning II was put through major weather testing -- the lab can do everything but lightning strikes and tornadoes -- such as wind, solar radiation, fog, humidity, rain intrusion/ingestion, freezing rain, icing cloud, icing build-up, vortex icing and snow. It handled temperatures ranging from 120 degrees Fahrenheit to -40 degrees, officials said in 2017. But even testing at McKinley is limiting, Ulmer said. "What doesn't happen is that they don't stay there a long time, so once we released [Block] 3F [software] capability, now the operational fleet can actually" test new extremes, he said, referring to both speed and temperature changes. Defense News also found that supersonic speeds caused "bubbling and blistering" on the JSF's low-observable stealth coating, and that hot environments impeded sufficient engine thrust to vertically land the Marine variant. "So they take it" to new environments "and they expose it more than flight test exposed the airplane. I'm an old flight test guy. You expect to learn in the operational environment more than you do in the [developmental test] environment because you don't necessarily fly the airplane [in that environment] all the time," Ulmer said. "So we learned a little bit, and you refine the design, and you solve it," he said, adding that the design and maintenance tweaks are ongoing. "The probability of the issue reoccuring on aircraft in the operational fleet is very low and with minimal impact to safety of flight or operational performance." Thirteen Category 1 deficiencies were found and reported by operators, according to the for-official-use-only documents Defense News obtained. Cat 1 is a label for problems that would directly impact safety or the mission. Those ranged from coating fixes; pressure anomalies in the cockpit that gave pilots ear and sinus pain; and washed-out imagery in the helmet-mounted display, among others. The Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps each fly a variant of the aircraft designed for different scenarios, from landing on conventional runways on land, to catching arresting cables on aircraft carriers, to landing like a helicopter on amphibious assault ships. Responding to the Defense News article series, Lockheed Martin said each deficiency "is well understood, already resolved or on a near-term path to resolution." "We've worked collaboratively with our customers, and we are fully confident in the F-35's performance and the solutions in place to address each of the items identified," the company said in a statement June 12. Growing pains with new planes and weapons programs are common. But the F-35 program has been under scrutiny since its inception, mainly for cost-effectiveness and functionality. A new estimate suggests that operating and supporting fighters for the next 60-plus years will cost the government $1.196 trillion. The older F-22 Raptor has had similar issues, especially with its stealth coating, which officials have said is more cumbersome to fix than the F-35, which was built with a more functional and durable coating in mind. "The [low-observable] system has significantly improved on the F-35 when compared to the F-22," Ulmer said Tuesday. "That's all lessons learned from F-22, applied to F-35." https://www.military.com/daily-news/2019/06/20/did-f-35-testing-extreme-weather-conditions-fall-short.html

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