2 mai 2022 | Local, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

MEET WITH THE NEW U.S. AMBASSADOR TO CANADA

May 10th 12 p.m to 1 p.m | Free | Registration Required

Towards a new era in Canada-US relations!  

 

On May 10th, we will have the honor and privilege of welcoming David L. Cohen, U.S Ambassador to Canada since December 2021. Mr. Cohen will share his vision and goals for strengthening the Canada-U. S relationship to support a sustainable and inclusive recovery for our economies.  

 

During a conversation co-hosted by Charles Milliard, President and CEO of the Quebec Federation of Chambers of Commerce, and Garry Douglas, President and CEO of the North Country Chamber of Commerce, Mr. Cohen will discuss avenues of collaboration to support SMEs in both countries, as well as opportunities for partnering to decarbonize our economies.  

 

REGISTER HERE!

 

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  • Canada’s New Drone Can Better Surveil Its Challenging Arctic Environment

    5 janvier 2021 | Local, Aérospatial

    Canada’s New Drone Can Better Surveil Its Challenging Arctic Environment

    BY KEVIN M. BAERSON After years of experimentation and analysis, the government of Canada has procured a new Hermes 900 StarLiner from Israeli UAV manufacturer Elbit Systems that can withstand and patrol its massive, inhospitable Arctic territory. Extreme weather with high winds and low temperatures, limited and unreliable satellite communication and navigation, and continuous darkness during the winter months make controlling UAVs in the Arctic especially challenging. Combined with a lack of ground infrastructure, both line of sight and satellite control of a UAV can become nearly impossible. The hope is that the Starliner can conquer these harsh Arctic conditions. This version of Elbit’s Medium Altitude Long Endurance (MALE) military UAV is fully certified to operate in civilian airspace and will take off from and land on civilian airfields. It will perform myriad operations to reduce harmful environmental impacts, including detection of oil pollution and wildlife surveying, as well as ice patrol and reconnaissance. It will also support search and rescue, humanitarian efforts and illegal fishing enforcement, and will aid the development and regulation of Canada’s drone industry. The $36.16 million contract includes communication links, ground control stations, sensor packages, training and the optional purchase of spare parts. The Starliner is expected to be delivered by December 2022, but procurement has been years in the making. Arctic Takeoff In 2017, Canadian officials began research and development test flights using a Sea Hunter drone produced by Alabama-based Griffon Aerospace. The data collected, including BVLOS results, contributed to developing requirements for the eventual Hermes purchase. Timothy Choi, a maritime strategy expert and Fellow at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute, has said the Canadian government had limited options in its search for a proven maritime drone with Arctic capabilities. “Large maritime surveillance drones—that is, ones equipped with downward-looking radar and AIS [automatic identification system] receivers to detect shipping—have not been as prevalent in the global drone market as their land-centric counterparts,” Choi told the website Eye On The Arctic. “Of these, there are even fewer that have been tested in Arctic conditions.” The model Canada is acquiring has been undergoing operational trials in Iceland via the European Maritime Safety Agency since summer 2019. At 1.6 tons, the StarLiner includes detect and avoid (DAA) systems, redundant datalinks and an advanced terrain avoidance warning system. Its ability to automatically take off and land in near-zero visibility, and to sustain deicing procedures and direct lightning strikes, makes it ideal for the Arctic’s extreme weather challenges. According to Canadian officials, the new UAV can operate at up to 72 degrees north latitude and has a range of more than 1,400 nautical miles. It comes equipped with back-up command and control and navigation systems, electrical optical infrared camera, synthetic aperture radar and a mapping camera system. For now, the majority of Canada’s Arctic surveillance data will continue to come from RADARSAT, the country’s remote sensing earth observation satellite program. But while the satellites can detect emergencies such as an oil spill, their brief visits over the Arctic make it difficult to identify causes and consequences. The same is true for identifying nefarious activities such as illegal dumping and unpermitted fishing. “The ability of a drone to loiter for long periods of time with higher resolution sensors will help fill this gap,” Choi explained. “Operationally, the new drone will greatly help ‘connect the dots’ when it comes to surveilling Arctic waters and enforcing Canadian regulations.” Drone Diplomacy While this Hermes version will be used in civilian missions, its acquisition is just one part of Canada’s Arctic Unmanned Aircraft System Initiative, and it will join the country’s National Aerial Surveillance Program’s manned aircraft fleet. With 75% of Canada’s coastline and 55% of its landmass located in the Arctic, Canada and its main regional rival, Russia, potentially contest for resources and the new shipping routes being created by global warming. Russia is deploying a fleet of dual-use extreme-weather UAVs featuring a GIRSAM alternative navigation system. China, which is talking about a “Polar Silk Road,” also is developing dual-use UAVs optimized for Arctic conditions. “Canada is committed to protecting our endangered species and our marine environment,” Canadian Transport Minister Marc Garneau said in a statement. “Integrating remotely piloted aircraft into Transport Canada’s fleet will make federal surveillance operations more robust than ever.” https://insideunmannedsystems.com/canadas-new-drone-can-better-surveil-its-challenging-arctic-environment/

  • New Cyber Security Strategy bolsters cyber safety, innovation and prosperity

    13 juin 2018 | Local, C4ISR

    New Cyber Security Strategy bolsters cyber safety, innovation and prosperity

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The National Cyber Security Strategy establishes a clear focal point for cyber security within the federal government. The Communications Security Establishment is well-positioned to create and house the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security by building on the tremendous skill and talent that already exist within the government and partnering with industry to strengthen cyber security in Canada.” - The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National Defence “The Government of Canada is committed to safeguarding Canadians’ digital privacy, security and the economy. For Canada’s small and medium-sized businesses, cyber threats can have profound economic consequences. 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The Cyber Centre will be outward-facing, open to collaboration with industry partners and academia, as well as a trusted resource for faster, stronger responses to cyber security incidents. Cyber security is, and continues to be a team effort.” - Scott Jones, Head of Canadian Centre for Cyber Security and Deputy Chief, IT Security, CSE  Quick facts Canadians spend the most time on-line of any country in the world – at 43.5 hours each per month. Cybercrime costs Canada 0.17% of its GDP, which is equal to $3.12 billion a year. Cyber-crime globally is estimated to cause $600-billion (US) in economic losses in 2018 and more than $6 trillion (US) by 2021. The global market for cyber security products and services is currently worth more than $96 billion (US), and is expected to grow to over $202 billion (US) by 2021. Budget 2018 invested $507.7M over five years and $108.8M per year ongoing to support the new Strategy. 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The Strategy reflects the perspectives from the Cyber Review and consultation. https://www.canada.ca/en/public-safety-canada/news/2018/06/new-cyber-security-strategy-bolsters-cyber-safety-innovation-and-prosperity.html

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