18 décembre 2018 | Local, Terrestre

General Dynamics Warns Trudeau Over Exit Penalties in Saudi Deal

By 

Canada is looking for a way out of a $13 billion deal to export armored vehicles to Saudi Arabia -- a move the company warns could leave the government liable for billions.

In a television interview Sunday, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the government was looking for a way to halt the sale of armored vehicles manufactured by a unit of U.S.-based General Dynamics Corp. “We are engaged with the export permits to try and see if there is a way of no longer exporting these vehicles to Saudi Arabia,” Trudeau told CTV, without elaborating.

Full article: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-12-17/trudeau-says-canada-wants-out-of-saudi-vehicle-export-deal

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