14 novembre 2017 | Local, Naval

French and Italian firms to submit joint bid on Canadian Surface Combatant

Fincantieri of Italy and Naval Group of France have confirmed they will jointly bid the FREMM frigate for the Canadian Surface Combatant program.

Bids are due on Nov. 30.

Fincantieri General Manager Alberto Maestrini told analysts of the joint bid in a Nov. 10 teleconference.

CSC will see the construction of 15 new warships.

Maestrini also said the FREMM frigate would be well-suited for another pending program, according to a report in Defense News. “We think it will also match perfectly the requirements put forward by the U.S. Navy in their recent request for design proposals for the Future Frigate Program,” Maestrini told analysts.

http://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/french-and-italian-firms-to-submit-joint-bid-on-canadian-surface-combatant

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  • Top Aces secures approval for F-16 adversary air fleet

    4 décembre 2020 | Local, Aérospatial

    Top Aces secures approval for F-16 adversary air fleet

    Posted on December 4, 2020 by Chris Thatcher Top Aces has received approval to acquire and import up to 29 F-16 aircraft from an undisclosed country, the company confirmed Thursday. The Dorval, Que.-based air combat training firm said in a statement that the Block 10 aircraft would be upgraded with its open architecture mission system and offered as a platform to support United States Department of Defense training beginning in 2021. While Top Aces would not yet confirm the country of origin, Israeli media on Dec. 2 claimed the seller is the Israeli Defense Ministry. According to CTech, the F-16s are 1980s-era aircraft that were retired as of 2016, and the Defense Ministry’s export agency is overseeing the deal. The company has been pursuing a fleet of Lockheed Martin F-16s for some time, to meet the training requirements of preparing next-generation pilots flying the F-35 Lightning II and F-22 Raptor. Top Aces confirmed in an interview in November 2019 that it was seeking to acquire 12 Block 15 A/B models from an undisclosed allied country. “The F-16 really is our growth platform for the future, especially for advanced adversary training,” said Paul Bouchard, president and chief executive officer. “It is the most prolific adversary aircraft in the Western world. It is the adversary aircraft of choice just because of its performance characteristics. It is a fourth-generation aircraft, so from an aircraft architecture standpoint, it can be equipped and configured in so many different ways. . . . And it is also scalable given there were more than 4,000 F-16s built. It is still a production aircraft. It has a lot of existing support in terms of sustainment.” If the deal with Israel is confirmed, the F-16 jets would be added to Top Aces’ current fleets of Dornier Alpha Jets and Douglas A-4 Skyhawks, and initially based at the F-16 Center of Excellence near the company’s U.S. headquarters in Mesa, Ariz. In October 2019, the company received an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity (IDIQ) contract that will allow it to compete with Air USA, Airborne Tactical Advantage Company, Blue Air Training, Coastal Defense, Draken International, and Tactical Air Support for adversary air services at 12 U.S. Air Force bases. Under the US$6.4 billion Combat Air Force Contracted Air Support (CAF CAS) contract, the Air Force can solicit individual tenders from those seven companies for advanced adversary air (ADAIR) capabilities as required, at 12 USAF bases. The contract runs until October 2024 and is estimated to involve between 40,000 to 50,000 flying hours. “As a named winner in the [CAF CAS] contract, Top Aces is uniquely positioned to offer the F-16 as the most capable and flexible ADAIR platform supporting the U.S. Department of Defense,” a spokesperson said on Thursday. Top Aces has been a pioneer in contracted aggressor or “red” air training for militaries, simulating hostile threats for fighter pilots, naval crews, and land forces for the Canadian Armed Forces since the mid-2000s. In October 2017, the company won a competition to retain the Canadian Contracted Airborne Training Services (CATS) program under a 10-year deal worth about US$480 million, which includes options to extend the service to 2031 and the value to as much as US$1.4 billion. The Canadian program is delivered with the Alpha Jet and Bombardier Learjet 35A aircraft, but Top Aces has proposed adding the F-16 when the Royal Canadian Air Force acquires its next-generation fighter. The high standards of the CATS program have opened the doors to international opportunities. The USAF contract would not have been possible without the “industry-leading” certification and airworthiness standards demanded by the RCAF and Transport Canada, Bouchard acknowledged in 2019. Top Aces secured a similar training support contract with the German Armed Forces in 2014 and, more recently, a two-year trial with the Australian Defence Force. https://www.skiesmag.com/news/top-aces-f16-adversary-air-fleet

  • Senator critiques defence procurement process

    13 février 2019 | Local, Aérospatial

    Senator critiques defence procurement process

    by Chris Thatcher An Ontario Senator says defence procurement needs better oversight and an improved process if it is to avoid the problems affecting the government’s efforts to replace the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CF-188 fighter jet fleet. “The fiasco of fighter jet replacement is the best example of a procurement system that is cumbersome, bureaucratic and beset by political interference,” Senator Nicole Eaton wrote in an article originally published in The Hill Times. “Unless ministers start to devote close attention to the management of major projects, or until the process is overhauled, Canadians can continue to expect poor outcomes and wasted taxpayer dollars.” Eaton is a member of the Senate National Finance Committee, which launched a study last fall into the processes and financial aspects of defence procurement. It held its first hearing on Oct. 30 and expects to conclude later this year. In her article, the senator critiqued the process by which Conservative and Liberal governments have struggled to replace the aging CF-188 Hornets, noting that while both Canada and Australia are members of the U.S.-led Joint Strike Fighter program to develop the F-35, Australia received its first two operational F-35s in December while Canada, as part of an interim measure, is poised to take delivery of the first of 25 “well-used” Australian F-18s. “As we take possession of Australia’s scrap, Canada is in the early stages of a minimum five-year-long process to pick a replacement for the F-18, which will be more than 50 years old before it is retired in the 2030s,” she wrote. The current government bears blame for creating some of the problems with the fighter file, she wrote, but “military procurement has bedeviled successive governments, Liberal and Conservative alike.” She attributed part of the problem to political interference for both partisan advantage and regional turf protection, but said the main reason for “paralysis in military procurement in Canada is it is too cumbersome and bureaucratic. Process is paramount and results are secondary. “There are layers of committees, depending on the size of the project, with membership from Public Services and Procurement Canada, National Defence, and Innovation, Science and Economic Development,” she wrote. “The consensus-based decision-making process on which these committees operate is supposed to avoid a big mistake — no doubt an appealing quality for a risk-averse bureaucracy, but the downside is the system is not conducive to fast action. Simply put, the buck stops nowhere.” Eaton suggested that bureaucratic morass has resulted in an inability to spend allotted project budgets, an indication the government could struggle to fulfil the commitments laid out in its 2017 defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged (SSE). “In the last fiscal year, the policy projected capital spending of $6.1 billion, yet only $3.7 billion was spent. This year, $6.55 billion is called for under SSE, but total appropriations to date amount to $4 billion,” she noted. “Given this poor track record, the idea that military spending can be cranked up by 70 per cent over 10 years, as envisioned in Strong, Secure, Engaged, looks increasingly fanciful. At the Finance committee’s first hearing on the procurement system, Patrick Finn, assistant deputy minister, Materiel at the Department of National Defence, and André Fillion, assistant deputy minister for defence and marine procurement at Public Services and Procurement Canada, faced a barrage of questions on ongoing participation in the F-35 program, the authorities and mandates of interdepartmental committees involved in military procurement, and about the challenge of balancing military requirements with equipment costs and opportunities for Canadian industry. “Buying a fighter plane isn’t like buying a compact car, and the role of the government is very important. We had to adapt our method of supply to the context of fighter jets,” Fillion told the senators. He said a draft RFP released in late October “was the result of many months of consultation on all five potential options (to replace the CF-188s). “There has been a lot of back and forth over the last several months to make sure that what we are asking meets the requirements of the Air Force and ensures that we do not inadvertently limit the competition. I feel very confident that what we’ve put together is fair, open and transparent to all the potential suppliers.” Finn said the government had met with and learned lessons from allies who had conducted similar fighter replacement programs. He also dismissed some of the concerns about acquiring used Australian aircraft to fill a gap while the government proceeds with the replacement project. “In our opinion, Canada has the best expertise related to this type of aircraft. Some companies in Montreal do maintenance for the United States and other countries because they have the necessary knowledge,” he said. “This aircraft will really increase our fleet, and it is not the number of aircraft that counts; it is rather the hours of use in the future. We are looking for an aircraft that will remain in service for another 14 years. What is needed is enough hours on the structural side. We will be able to use these aircraft until the entire fleet is no longer in service.” https://www.skiesmag.com/news/senator-critiques-defence-procurement-process

  • La Défense nationale lance son programme IDEeS visant à résoudre les défis en matière de défense et de sécurité grâce à l’innovation

    9 avril 2018 | Local, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    La Défense nationale lance son programme IDEeS visant à résoudre les défis en matière de défense et de sécurité grâce à l’innovation

    Communiqué de presse De : Défense nationale Le 9 avril 2018 – Ottawa, Ontario – Défense nationale/Forces armées canadiennes La résolution de problèmes, la créativité et la connaissance sont nécessaires pour affronter et atténuer les menaces en constante évolution en matière de défense et de sécurité. Grâce à l’innovation, nous développerons et maintiendrons des capacités permettant de relever les défis liés à l’environnement mondial actuel de la sécurité.   En vue de transformer notre manière de créer des solutions aux problèmes complexes de défense et de sécurité, le ministère de la Défense nationale (MDN) a lancé aujourd’hui son nouveau programme Innovation pour la défense, l’excellence et la sécurité (IDEeS). Annoncé en juin 2017 au moment de la diffusion de la politique de défense du Canada, Protection, Sécurité, Engagement, le programme IDEeS sera à l’origine d’investissements de 1,6 milliard de dollars dans le milieu canadien de l’innovation au cours des 20 prochaines années. Au moyen d’IDEeS, le MDN se tournera vers les esprits les plus novateurs et les plus créatifs du Canada, qu’il s’agisse d’inventeurs, d’universitaires qui travaillent dans les laboratoires de leur établissement ou de scientifiques attachés à des sociétés de petite ou de grande envergure. Ces penseurs novateurs fourniront aux praticiens des Forces armées canadiennes (FAC) et du Canada en matière de sûreté et de sécurité des solutions inédites aux problèmes d’aujourd’hui. Le programme IDEeS stimulera l’innovation au moyen d’une gamme d’activités, dont des compétitions, des concours, des réseaux et des bacs à sable pour la mise à l'essai de concepts sur le terrain. Le ministre Sajjan a lancé aujourd’hui son premier appel de propositions dans le cadre de l’élément des projets concurrentiels d’IDEeS, dans lequel seize problèmes en matière de défense et de sécurité ont été recensés. Les parties intéressées disposent de six semaines pour présenter leurs propositions de solutions, qui doivent être transmises au plus tard le 24 mai 2018. Cet appel de propositions aborde les difficultés dans certains domaines, comme la surveillance, les cyberoutils de défense, l’espace, l’intelligence artificielle, les systèmes de télépilotage, l’analytique des données et la performance humaine. Les propositions seront examinées et feront l’objet d’un processus d’évaluation rigoureux. Les premiers contrats devraient être attribués à l’automne 2018. Les innovateurs sont invités à consulter le site Web d’IDEeS pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements sur cet appel de propositions et sur les appels subséquents à mesure qu’IDEeS prendra forme.    Citations « Le programme IDEeS présentera aux Canadiens des occasions inédites de faire valoir leurs meilleures solutions aux problèmes de défense et de sécurité et de placer ces solutions entre les mains des femmes et des hommes des Forces armées canadiennes. Cet investissement appuiera la croissance et l’épanouissement du milieu canadien de l’innovation au cours des deux prochaines décennies. » – Harjit S. Sajjan, ministre de la Défense nationale Faits en bref Grâce au programme IDEeS, la Défense nationale : créera des réseaux d’innovateurs (universitaires, industrie, particuliers et autres partenaires) pour mener des travaux de pointe en recherche et développement dans des domaines essentiels aux futurs besoins en défense et en sécurité; organisera des concours et invitera les innovateurs à présenter des solutions viables à des problèmes précis en matière de défense et de sécurité; instaurera de nouveaux rouages d’acquisition qui lui permettront d’élaborer et de mettre à l’épreuve des concepts, dans le cas des idées les plus prometteuses. Le programme IDEeS aidera les innovateurs en appuyant l’analyse, en finançant la recherche et en élaborant des processus pour faciliter l’accès à la connaissance. Il soutiendra également les tests, l’intégration, l’adoption et l’acquisition de solutions créatives pour les milieux canadiens de la défense et de la sécurité. Liens connexes Documentation – Programme Innovation pour la défense, l’excellence et la sécurité (IDEeS) Documentation – Le gouvernement du Canada lance un appel aux innovateurs pour résoudre des défis en matière de défense et de sécurité IDEeS Protection, Sécurité, Engagement Personnes-ressources Byrne Furlough Attaché de presse Cabinet du ministre de la Défense nationale Téléphone : 613-996-3100 Courriel : Byrne.Furlough@forces.gc.ca Relations avec les médias Ministère de la Défense nationale Téléphone : 613-996-2353 Courriel : mlo-blm@forces.gc.ca https://www.canada.ca/fr/ministere-defense-nationale/nouvelles/2018/04/la-defense-nationale-lance-son-programme-idees-visant-a-resoudre-les-defis-en-matiere-de-defense-et-de-securite-grace-a-linnovation.html

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