30 juillet 2019 | Information, Aérospatial, C4ISR

Drones R&D Portfolio and Opportunity Analysis Report 2019 - ResearchAndMarkets.com

DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The "Drones: R&D Portfolio and Opportunity Analysis" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

Drones are unmanned aerial vehicles that are finding application opportunities in various industries and have the potential to transform military as well as consumer applications. Drones essentially combine various sensing and communication technologies along with remote control or autonomous capabilities. Drones were initially developed for military purposes, which is still the most prominent application of this technology. However, with substantial decrease in the cost of individual components, drones are poised to impact multiple industries in various capacities.

Drones for commercial applications represent a market that is entering the growth phase. Military drones have been around for some time, but commercial drones enable diverse applications to benefit because various stakeholders will experience high growth in the near term. Drone technology is an example of convergence of various technologies such as sensors, artificial intelligence, analytics and so on, that enables greater connectivity by acting as a carrier for the Internet.

Key Questions Answered in the Technology and Innovation Report

1. What is the significance of drones?

2. What are the technology trends and key enabling technologies?

3. What are the factors that influence technology development and adoption?

4. Who are the key innovators driving developments?

5. What are the opportunities based on patent and funding trends?

6. What are the future prospects of the technology?

7. What sort of strategies do OEMs need to embrace to gain entry and sustain in the competitive marketplace?

Key Topics Covered:

1. Executive Summary

1.1 Scope of the Technology and Innovation Research

1.2 Research Methodology

1.3 Research Methodology Explained

1.4 Summary of Key Findings

2. Drone - Technology Significance and Trends

2.1 Technology Significance and Classification of Drones

2.2 Drone Types, Benefits and Applications

2.3 Current Trends Boosting the Drone Market

2.4 Drone Technology - Industry Value Chain Analysis

3. Factors Influencing Technology and Market Potential

3.1 Market Drivers: Growing Trend Toward Fully Autonomous Drones and IoT

3.2 Demand for Fully Autonomous Drones and Big Data Analytics Expected to Increase in the Future

3.3 Market Challenges: Stringent Regulatory Environment and Lack of Business Models Restrict Wider Adoption of Drones

3.4 Stringent Regulatory Environment and High Investment Cost are Key Challenges

3.5 Market Potential and Market Attractiveness of Drones

4. Application Assessment - Key Trending Applications

4.1 Key Trending Applications of Drones

4.2 Key Applications - Military & Defense, Emergency Response & Disaster Management and Urban Planning

4.3 Key Applications - Healthcare, Agriculture, Waste Management

4.4 Key Applications - Mining, Telecommunication, and Media

4.5 Drone Application Significance and Advantages

5. Global Patent Landscape, Funding, and Regional Adoption Assessment

5.1 Drone - Global Patent Trend Analysis

5.2 Funding Trends Shows High Interest from Government for Healthcare and Homeland Security Applications

5.3 Funding Boosts Growth Opportunities in the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Sector

5.4 Drone Adoption Assessment in North America

5.5 Drone Adoption Assessment in Europe

5.6 Drone Adoption Analysis in APAC

6. Key Innovations, Technology Developments and Megatrend Impacts

6.1 Innovations in Drone Flight Technologies

6.2 Developments in Drone Features and Applications

6.3 Advancements in Technologies Enabling Fully Autonomous Drones

6.4 Key Stakeholder Initiatives and Developments

6.5 University-based Innovations Enabling Drone Applications

6.6 Megatrends that Influence the Drone Industry

7. Growth Opportunities, Future Trends and Strategic Imperatives

7.1 Drone Technology Development Trends

7.2 Policy Regulations and Economic Factors Influencing Drone Industry - PESTLE Analysis

7.3 Growth Opportunities - Fully Automated Drone Delivery and Monitoring Systems

7.4 Strategic Imperative Analysis

7.5 Key Questions for Strategic Planning

8. Synopsis of Key Patents in the Drone Sector

8.1 Key Patents - Drone Collision Avoidance and Delivery Systems

8.2 Key Patents - Swarm Drones and Networked Drones

8.3 Key Patents - Drone Network Delivery System and Detection

8.4 Key Patents - Optical Recognition System and Printed Can Lid

9. Key Industry Contacts

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/p8i79h

https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190729005465/en

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