13 décembre 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

Brexit A Certainty After Boris Johnson Election Landslide

Brexit A Certainty After Boris Johnson Election Landslide

By Tony Osborne

LONDON – Britain's aerospace industry is waking up to Brexit certainty after Prime Minister Boris Johnson secured a landslide majority in a Dec. 12 general election.

Johnson's Conservative party secured a significant majority in the British Parliament – the largest since Margaret Thatcher in the 1980s - which will enable him to push through his vision of Brexit on Jan. 31, 2020 ending Parliamentary and legal deadlocks that have delayed the UK's departure from the EU since the original date of March 29, 2019.

For aerospace, the Parliamentary majority means stability in planning and investment, and there are unlikely to be any more delays to the process. It should also mean that the threat of a no-deal Brexit – widely considered the worst-case scenario for aerospace – has largely evaporated for now.

The current iteration of the withdrawal agreement between Britain and the EU calls for regulatory alignment with the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), but the two sides still have to negotiate future trade agreements once the UK has exited the EU. A lack of agreement here could result in a no-deal.

British aerospace and defense trade association ADS said it was looking forward to working with the new government but said that ministers needed to “deliver a close future relationship with the European Union."

In a statement, ADS CEO Paul Everitt called on the government to push forward with “investments in innovation and green technologies, develop a defense and security industrial strategy and an ambitious national space program.”

Airbus, one of the most vocal aerospace companies against Brexit, said it welcomed the fact that the British government now has a “clear mandate” and is looking forward to “positive discussions.”

“Airbus remains concerned by the potential for a ‘no-deal' in December 2020 and we will continue to plan for that scenario as that is the only way any responsible business can plan,” the company said in a statement. “We will continue to run our major Brexit project in order to further eradicate and/or mitigate risks.”

If the election result made Brexit more likely, it makes the break-up of the UK more probable too after the Scottish National Party (SNP) secured 48 of the 59 Parliamentary seats in Scotland.

SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon said the result was a mandate for a second Scottish independence referendum. The Conservative government is unlikely to green-light such a referendum, but independence would have significant ramifications for UK defense given the presence of several airbases and the UK's ballistic missile submarines carrying the nuclear deterrent.

https://aviationweek.com/defense/brexit-certainty-after-boris-johnson-election-landslide

Sur le même sujet

  • US Air Force awards contract for new helicopter

    25 septembre 2018 | International, Aérospatial

    US Air Force awards contract for new helicopter

    WASHINGTON, D.C. (AFNS) -- Today the Air Force awarded the first portion of a $2.38 billion firm-fixed-price contract to The Boeing Company for a UH-1N Replacement helicopter. "Strong competition drove down costs for the program, resulting in $1.7 billion in savings to the taxpayer,” said Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson. The original service cost estimate was $4.1 billion. Today's award of approximately $375 million is for the first four helicopters and includes the integration of non-developmental items. This additional equipment integrated into the aircraft will ensure the helicopters are ready to meet warfighter needs upon delivery. The total program cost for the UH-1N Replacement Program reflects the exercise of all options and provides for the acquisition and sustainment of up to 84 MH-139 helicopters, training devices and associated support equipment to replace the legacy UH-1Ns. The new helicopter will be an important tool for Airmen charged with securing and defending the nation's intercontinental ballistic missiles. The Air Force will also use the aircraft for training, test and operational support airlift. The Air Force pursued a full and open competition to deliver increased capabilities to warfighters. This replacement will provide the necessary speed, range, endurance and carrying capacity needed to meet the requirements of five Air Force major commands, officials said. "A safe, secure and effective nuclear enterprise is job one," said Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein. "It is imperative that we field a capable and effective helicopter to replace UH-1Ns providing security for our ICBMs and nuclear deterrence operations." The first operational helicopter delivery is expected in Fiscal Year 2021. https://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1643707/air-force-awards-contract-for-new-helicopter/source/GovD/

  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - February 15, 2019

    18 février 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité, Autre défense

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - February 15, 2019

    NAVY The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Cambridge, Massachusetts, is awarded a $191,029,190 fixed-price-incentive-fee contract for the production of TRIDENT II D5 Strategic Weapon System MK6 Guidance Equivalent Units. This contract contains options which, if exercised, would bring the total contract value to $391,767,950. Work will be performed in Cambridge, Massachusetts (30.5 percent); Clearwater, Florida (20.6 percent); Pittsfield, Massachusetts (43.2 percent); and McKinney, Texas (5.7 percent). The work is expected to be completed by July 31, 2022. If the option is exercised, work will continue through July 31, 2023. Fiscal 2019 weapons procurement (Navy) funds in the amount of $189,489,000; and United Kingdom funds in the amount of $1,540,190 are being obligated on this award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was awarded on a sole-source basis in accordance with 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1)&(4) and was previously synopsized on the Federal Business Opportunity website. Strategic Systems Programs, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity (N00030-19-C-0008). Lockheed Martin Rotary and Mission Systems, Syracuse, New York, is awarded a $20,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, cost-plus-incentive-fee and firm-fixed-price contract for engineering and technical services for the design, development, testing, integration, technology insertion/refreshment and system support of the AN/BLQ-10 Electronic Warfare System (Technology Insertion (TI)-20, TI-22, and TI-24) on new-construction and in-service submarines. This contract includes options which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $970,083,614. Work will be performed in Syracuse, New York (95 percent); and Manassas, Virginia (5 percent), and is expected to be completed by February 2020. If options are exercised, work will continue through February 2029. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funding in the amount of $8,500,000 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with two offers received. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity (N00024-19-D-6200). The Boeing Co., St. Louis, Missouri, is awarded a $17,777,048 modification to a previously awarded, cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N00019-18-D-0001). This modification increases the ceiling of the contract to procure up to an additional quantity of two F/A-18E/F aircraft, modified to extend the service life of the aircraft. Work will be performed in St. Louis, Missouri (75 percent); and El Segundo, California (25 percent), and is expected to be completed in October 2020. No funds are being obligated at time of award, funds will be obligated on individual orders as they are issued. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. Su-Mo Builders Inc.,* Honolulu, Hawaii, is awarded $9,989,777 for firm-fixed-price task order N6247819F4051 under a previously awarded, multiple award construction contract (N62478-18-D-4023) to provide repair to the mess hall and replace the walk-in freezer and cooling systems at Building 1089, Marine Corps Base, Hawaii. The project includes repairs to various areas and components of the mess hall, as well as electrical work, landscaping, the construction of two mechanical enclosures, and the installation of hand wash stations, an entry vestibule, and air conditioning. Work will be performed in Kaneohe, Hawaii, and is expected to be completed by September 2020. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Marine Corps) contract funds in the amount of $9,989,777 are obligated on this award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Six proposals were received for this task order. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Hawaii, Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, is the contracting activity. Seemans Composites, Gulfport, Mississippi, is awarded a $9,125,520 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for the machining center proposal. This effort will evaluate Navy unmanned underwater vehicles launch and recovery needs and define target areas for further evaluation and design definition. Work will be performed in Gulfport, Mississippi, and is expected to be completed Feb. 11, 2022. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation (Navy) funds in the amount of $9,125,520 are obligated at the time of award. No funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured under N00014-18-S-B001 lLong range broad agency announcement (BAA). Proposals will be received throughout the year under the long range BAA; therefore, the number of proposals received in response to the solicitation is unknown. The Office of Naval Research, Arlington, Virginia, is the contracting activity (N00014-19-C-2015). DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY SupplyCore Inc.,* Rockford, Illinois, has been awarded a maximum $90,000,000 firm-fixed-price, bridge contract for facilities maintenance, repair, and operations items. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is an eight-month contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Illinois, with an Oct. 25, 2019, performance completion date. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019, through 2020 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE8E3-19-D-0004). Excel Garment Manufacturing Ltd.,* El Paso, Texas, has been awarded a maximum $15,526,032 firm-fixed-price, definite-quantity contract for Navy utility coveralls. This was a competitive acquisition with three offers received. This is an eight-month contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Texas, with an Oct. 14, 2019, performance completion date. Using military service is Navy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE1C1-19-C-0004). ARMY Oshkosh Defense LLC, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, was awarded a $74,189,379 modification (P00004) to contract W56HZV-18-F-0153 for procurement of Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles variants. Work will be performed in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2021. Fiscal 2019 other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $74,189,379 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity. Abt Associates Rockville, Maryland (W912HQ-19-D-0002); AECOM Technical Services Inc., Los Angeles, California (W912HQ-19-D-0003); Booz Allen Hamilton Inc., McLean, Virginia (W912HQ-19-D-0004); and CDM Federal Programs Corp., Carbondale, Illinois (W912HQ-19-D-0005), will compete for each order of the $47,200,000 firm-fixed-price contract for navigation, data and systems analytical and professional support services. Bids were solicited via the internet with seven received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Feb. 14, 2024. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, is the contracting activity. The Boeing Co., Mesa, Arizona, was awarded a $12,850,128 firm-fixed-price foreign military sales (Qatar) contract for post-production support services for the Qatar Armed Forces AH-64E Apache helicopter fleet. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work will be performed in Mesa, Arizona, with an estimated completion date of Feb. 14, 2024. Fiscal 2019 foreign military sales funds in the amount of $3,078,195 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W58RGZ-19-C-0020). AIR FORCE Apogee Engineering, Colorado Springs, Colorado, has been awarded a $28,193,611 firm-fixed-price contract for Space Logistics Infrastructure Support Services (SLISS) – 2. The SLISS-2 contract will provide services to the Space and Missile System Center Space Logistics Directorate and related space organizations. The SLISS-2 contract will be used to acquire non-personal services in support of various missions, command, control, communications and intelligence activities within Air Force Space Command. Additionally, the contract will provide logistical support to various space organizations such as, Air Force Satellite Control Network, Space Lift Range System, Global Positioning System, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, Military Satellite Communications, and Space Based Infrared Systems. Work will be performed at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado; and Schriever AFB, Colorado, and is expected to be completed Feb. 28, 2025. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and four offers were received. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $4,515,781 are being obligated at the time of award. Space and Missile Center/Sustainment Directorate at Peterson AFB, Colorado, is the contracting activity (FA8823-19-F-0001). Jackpine Technologies Corp., Maynard, Massachusetts, has been awarded a $12,000,000 single-award, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for the Hanscom Development, Security and Operations Cloud. This contract provides for on and off premise cloud-based service provider to the Department of Defense (DoD) community, acting as a collaborative and secure platform to test, develop and connect a multitude of DoD-wide users. Work will be performed at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, and is expected to be completed Feb. 14, 2021. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition. Foreign military sales funds in the amount of $45,000 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts, is the contracting activity (FA8730-19-D-0003). DEFENSE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AGENCY Intelligent Waves LLC, Reston, Virginia, was awarded a competitive firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract with the Defense Information Systems Agency to provide global logistical service management and field service representatives in support of the Distributed Tactical Communication System and the Department of Defense Enhanced Mobile Satellite Services program. The cumulative face value of this action is $48,000,000 with the base year funded by fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The basic proposal was solicited via electronic means through FedBizOps with six proposals received. The period of performance is from Feb. 25, 2019, to Feb. 24, 2020, with four 12-month option periods. Performance will be at various locations within the U.S. and deployed locations worldwide. The Defense Information Technology Contracting Organization, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, is the contracting activity (HC1013-19-D-0003). IntelSat General Corp., McLean, Virginia, was awarded a firm-fixed-price contract modification to exercise Option Period Three on task order GS-35F-0478U/HC1013-16-F-0020 for commercial satellite communications service in direct support of the U.S. Air Force's Central Command network architecture, which includes fixed and mobile platforms, including remotely piloted aircraft and communications on-the-move assets. The face value of this action is $8,553,756 funded by fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds. Primary performance will be at the contractor's facility. The period of performance is Feb. 16, 2019, through Feb. 15, 2020. The Defense Information Technology Contracting Organization, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, is the contracting activity (HC1013-16-F-0020-P00007). * Small business https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1759513/source/GovDelivery/

  • COVID-19′s fiscal impact might ironically strengthen national defense

    23 avril 2020 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    COVID-19′s fiscal impact might ironically strengthen national defense

    By: Lt. Col. Daniel L. Davis (ret.) As Congress and the White House cope with the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic by passing multitrillion-dollar stimulus packages, many are already grappling with the thorny problem of how we'll eventually pay for the spike in spending. While no one ever wants to be a bill-payer, the defense industry is predictably first out of the blocks seeking immunity from any future cuts by trotting out its favorite weapon: fear. Don't be fooled by this tried-and-true tactic: The claim that any cuts to the defense budget will imperil defense is gravely mistaken. Without changes in the foreign policy we enact — and a rational reform of how we spend our defense dollars — our national security will continue to decay. First, the cold, hard economic reality: The damage done to our economy by the necessary measures federal and state governments have enacted to safeguard American lives has been breathtaking in its scope and severity. Some estimates suggest gross domestic product will contract this year by as much as 40 percent, and unemployment could balloon to 30 percent. To help stem the tide, Congress has already passed a $2 trillion stimulus package, with more yet to come. With an already massive national debt of $24 trillion, the combination of government spending and the loss of tax revenue is going to place serious pressure on future budgets for years to come. These bills will eventually have to be paid, and no area of the budget will be free from scrutiny — including defense. Though the Department of Defense should be funded to whatever level is required to ensure the ability of our armed forces to deter and, if necessary defeat any adversary that may seek to deprive our citizens of life or liberty, not all aspects of the status quo are helping keep us safe. Retired Army Lt. Gen. Thomas Spoehr recently co-wrote an article arguing that regardless of the financial strain imposed by the coronavirus stimulus bills, defense spending should be exempted. The reason, he says, is that the military today remains in a yearslong “free-fall” which “can't be fixed in a year or even four.” The last thing America's leaders should do when responding to the financial constraints imposed by the coronavirus, he concludes, is to “weaken the military.” His implications that military readiness has been in free fall because of inadequate spending and that any reduction in defense spending weakens the military are beliefs held by many — and are inaccurate for several key reasons. Clinging to forever wars might be the biggest. The DoD has to spend hundreds of billions annually to fight, maintain and prepare for subsequent deployments fighting the forever wars we've been waging for the better part of two decades. Congress has allocated more than $2 trillion in direct outlays since 9/11 to fight so-called emergency requirements of overseas contingency operations, or OCO, and we have incurred an additional $4 trillion in associated and long-term costs. For fiscal 2020 alone, we will spend upward of an additional $137 billion on these OCO wars. What is critical to understand, however, is that the perpetual continuation of these wars not only fails to improve our security — these fights negatively impact our ability to focus on and prepare for fighting adversaries that could one day pose an existential threat to us. The implications of this reality are considerable — and potential remedies can be of great help to our country. If President Donald Trump were to order an end to some or all of our unnecessary forever wars, we could instantly save more than $100 billion a year without cutting anything else in the defense budget. If we then conducted prudent and necessary reforms in how we manage research and development, procurement, and acquisition, and in shedding unnecessary or outdated expenditures, tens of billions of additional savings could be realized. Perhaps more importantly we could redirect much more focus and resources on training and professional education, which would enable the armed forces to better deter — and if necessary defeat — major opponents. Those two major changes alone would end the weakening of our military and materially contribute to strengthening its key capabilities — while lessening pressure on the federal budget. The financial pressures this coronavirus is already placing on our nation's finances is real, and its effects will be felt for years. We will have to make hard decisions in the days ahead on where we spend our limited resources. If we are wise, we can reduce how much we spend on defense while simultaneously increasing our military power. Retired U.S. Army Lt. Col. Daniel L. Davis is a senior fellow for Defense Priorities. He retired from the Army in 2015 after 21 years in service that included four combat deployments. https://www.defensenews.com/opinion/commentary/2020/04/22/covid-19s-fiscal-impact-might-ironically-strengthen-national-defense/

Toutes les nouvelles