15 janvier 2019 | Local, Aérospatial

Airbus songe à b'tir deux nouvelles usines au Québec

JEAN-FRANÇOIS CODÈRE
La Presse

Le géant Airbus pourrait, s'il décroche deux importants contrats canadiens dont l'octroi doit se faire au cours des prochaines années, b'tir deux nouvelles usines d'assemblage au Québec, probablement à Mirabel, a laissé entendre ce matin Simon Jacques, chef d'Airbus Défense au Canada.

Le premier de ces contrats doit être octroyé cette année par Télésat, un opérateur canadien de satellites de télécommunication. Celui-ci souhaite lancer quelques centaines de nouveaux satellites à orbite basse pour un réseau d'accès à l'Internet. Selon M. Jacques, l'usine qui fabriquerait ces satellites pourrait employer environ 200 personnes. L'entreprise affirme mener des discussions avec les gouvernements provincial et fédéral en vue de l'installer au Québec, si elle obtient le contrat.

« Ce serait un game changer pour l'aérospatiale au Canada », estime M. Jacques.

Avions de chasse

L'autre contrat, plus important, est celui du remplacement des avions de chasse canadiens. Airbus est l'une des quatre entreprises, avec Boeing, Lockheed et SAAB, qui manifeste toujours son intérêt pour l'obtention de cet important contrat concernant 88 chasseurs, qui devront remplacer la flotte de F18 actuels.

L'une des conditions de cet appel d'offres, qui doit normalement être lancé avant la prochaine campagne électorale fédérale, imposera du contenu canadien. Dans ce contexte, Airbus étudie l'option de construire une usine d'assemblage final au Canada, probablement au Québec, a aussi indiqué M. Jacques.

Airbus a par ailleurs confirmé que la Société en commandite C Series, où elle est associée à Bombardier et au gouvernement du Québec, investit présentement 30 millions de dollars américains (40 millions de dollars) pour améliorer ses installations de Mirabel. Des dômes permettant d'héberger des avions en construction seront ajoutés au printemps. Ils sont déjà en construction. Un nouveau centre de livraison sera aussi ajouté au quatrième trimestre.

https://www.lapresse.ca/affaires/economie/transports/201901/14/01-5210974-airbus-songe-a-batir-deux-nouvelles-usines-au-quebec.php

Sur le même sujet

  • Defence Procurement’s Effectiveness Dissected at Ottawa Conference

    25 novembre 2019 | Local, Autre défense

    Defence Procurement’s Effectiveness Dissected at Ottawa Conference

    By James Careless How well is Canada's defence procurement actually working, and are industry-boosters like ITBs paying off? These and other questions were tackled at the ‘Defence in the 43rd Parliament' one-day conference on November 20, 2019. It was staged by the Canadian Global Affairs Institute (CGAI) at the Chateau Laurier hotel, before a full house in the Adam Room. During the opening session, ‘Canadian Defence Procurement – The State of the Union', DND Associate Deputy Minister Claude Rochette was cautiously upbeat about the state of Canadian defence procurements. In the last year, DND has signed about 12,000 contracts and spent about $6 billion on procurements, he said. Most of these contracts were on time and on budget. 2019's defence procurement spending is up from $4.9 billion spent by DND in 2016, Rochette noted. In addition, this year DND will “close out its budget” by spending its allocated funds, he said. Despite some criticisms that Canadian defence procurements are not moving fast enough, “we are doing pretty well,” said Claude Rochette. But the process isn't perfect, he admitted. “We have more work to do.” Rochette's positive assessment was echoed by PSPC Associate Deputy Minister Michael Vandergrift. 2019 “has been a very busy time” in Canadian defence procurement, he said, During the past year, the federal government issued an RfP for the Future Fighter Capability project; sole-sourced Light Armoured Vehicles from General Dynamics Land Systems-Canada; and selected Lockheed Martin to built 15 Canadian Surface Combatant ships. Asked which defence procurements are going well and which are posing challenges, Rochette replied that smaller projects that fall within DND's $5 million spending authority are easy to manage. Where issues crop up is in large multi-million dollar projects with long time lines: Trying to cost them accurately and manage them effectively is akin to asking, “I want to have a car and buy it next year, so tell me how much I'll pay for it (right now),” he said. In a later morning session entitled, ‘Offsets – Is the ITB Policy Delivering?', the panel considered the impact of procurement bidders ‘overcommitting' to ITBs (promising financial benefits worth more than the contracts they are bidding for) on the Canadian defence industry. Such ITB overcommittments, which can be worth 300% or more than the contract being sought, are “introducing unnecessary risk” in the Canadian defence industry, said Rich Foster, Vice President of L3 Harris Technologies - Canada. The result of overcommitting is that contractors are “now focussed more on quantity than quality” in making their procurement decisions, he said. The real victims of ITB overcommittments are SMEs, which lack the resources available to large companies to pay for these big ITBs. The choice facing these SMEs is to directly/indirectly seek such contracts – which can run 20-40 years – “or you go out of business,” said Brian Botting, Director of Strategic Offsets at General Dynamics Missions Systems. “It is a terrible dilemma for them to be in.” The CGAI procurement conference ended with the panel discussion, ‘Defence Procurement Canada'. This is the name of the integrated procurement agency the Liberals proposed during the October 2019 election, to replace the multiple ministries currently sharing this responsibility. The common sense reason for having a single defence procurement agency comes down to human nature: “If you ask two of your kids to take out the garbage, it won't get done,” quipped Alan Williams, President of The Williams Group. “If you ask one of your kids, maybe it will get taken out.” He explained that sharing procurement among ministries causes requires agreement between multiple ministers and deputy ministers – which wastes time -- and that Canada's military allies manage their procurements through single agencies. Creating a separate Defence Procurement Canada (DPC) agency would not be easy, said Jim Mitchell, Research Associate with the University of Ottawa's Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. Speaking from his own government experience, Mitchell observed that such changes are “disruptive, costly, difficult, hard on people, and hurt efficiency and effectiveness for a few years.” Mitchell added that creating DPC would not prevent Treasury Board and other ministries from having a role in defence procurement afterwards. CGAI Fellow Gavin Liddy was just as pessimistic about the value of creating DPC when so many defence procurements are underway. If the government wants “to do one single thing to delay the procurement agenda in the next five to seven years,” then they should instruct defence bureaucrats to create the DPC, Liddy concluded. “Nothing would divert their attention more than doing that.” http://www.canadiandefencereview.com/news?news/2765

  • Naval contracts and technology developments on display at CANSEC 2019

    3 juin 2019 | Local, Naval

    Naval contracts and technology developments on display at CANSEC 2019

    DAVID PUGLIESE, OTTAWA CITIZEN The CANSEC 2019 defence trade show in Ottawa has wrapped up, and while much of the focus and talk was on new fighter jets, the naval side of procurement didn't escape notice. A number of firms have recent contracts or technology advancements, as outlined in this article in Esprit de Corps magazine. ATLAS ELEKTRONIK GmbH recently announced successful SeaSpider sea trials that were done in co-operation with the German Bundeswehr Technical Center for ships and naval weapons, maritime technology and research. The SeaSpider is the world's first dedicated Anti-Torpedo Torpedo. Trials in the Baltic Sea were conducted on a WTD 71 multipurpose vessel, according to the company. Those involved the full “sensor to shooter” chain with Torpedo Detection, Classification and Localisation, or TDCL sonar, being successfully demonstrated with the third generation SeaSpider prototype with its above water launcher. At the test range both a Mk37 torpedo derived AUV and torpedoes of the DM2A3 type served as the threats. Those were detected and localized with passive and active TDCL and the data was used to cue the SeaSpider launch. SeaSpider acquired the threats and homed in into closest point of approach, the firm noted. The successful “intercept” was verified by acoustic and optical means. Saab's Sea Giraffe AMB naval radar will be used for the Royal Canadian Navy's Joint Support Ships. Saab will do the work on the project both in Sweden and Halifax. Deliveries of the radars are to take place between 2020 and 2022. Seaspan Shipyards has awarded MAN Energy Solutions Canada of Vancouver, BC, a contract valued at $55 million for work on the Royal Canadian Navy's new Joint Support Ships or JSS. MAN is one of several major systems integrators that Seaspan is working with in order to meet its commitments under the National Shipbuilding Strategy, the firm noted. Under this contract MAN will provide propulsion and power generation components for the JSS. This will include two MAN 12V32/44CR (Common Rail) propulsion engines equipped with environmental protection SCR technology, reduction gears, propulsion shafts, propellers, ship service diesel generator sets, and an emergency diesel generator set. Work on these components will take place in Europe at MAN's manufacturing facilities. Work taking place in Canada will include MAN providing the integration for these systems, training, testing, and support during the harbour acceptance trials and the JSS sea acceptance trials, according to Seaspan. MDA, a Maxar company, announced that it has signed a $4 million contract with Lockheed Martin Canada. That deal is for the initial phase of design work for the Canadian Surface Combatant ship's Electronic Warfare system. The Águas Azuis Consortium, formed by thyssenkrupp Marine Systems, Embraer Defense & Security and Atech, was selected by the Brazilian Navy for the construction of four defence ships in the Tamandaré Corvettes Class Program as preferred bidder. With thyssenkrupp Marine Systems' leadership and its naval systems expertise, the Águas Azuis Consortium companies will now form a specific purpose company for the implementation phase of the program, the firms noted. Atech, an Embraer Group company, will be the supplier of the Combat Management System and Integrated Platform Management System of the Tamandaré Class corvettes. It will be involved in the transfer of technology in cooperation with ATLAS ELEKTRONIK, a subsidiary of thyssenkrupp Marine Systems, and L3 MAPPS. Embraer Defense & Security will integrate sensors and weaponry into the combat system. Kognitiv Spark of Fredericton, NB will be providing the Royal Canadian Navy with the opportunity to test a Mixed Reality Remote Assistant Support system as part of a project that aims to improve maintenance and repairs aboard naval vessels. The system can be used by RCN marine technicians and weapons engineering technicians to ensure that RCN ships remain at a high-level of readiness for both routine training and operational deployments, according to the firm The project hopes to validate technology adopted from Kognitiv Spark, whose software is designed for use with the Microsoft HoloLens. The software leverages Augmented Reality, Mixed Reality, and the integration of Artificial Intelligence to improve efficiencies with ship operations including repairs, maintenance and knowledge transfer, the firm added. For remote maintenance, a subject-matter expert using this system can see what the HoloLens wearer sees from anywhere in the world. The expert can provide guidance using real-time voice and video, interactive 3D holograms and content, and live IoT data. Alternatively, the technician can use locally stored data to assist with routine tasks when a remote expert is not available. The holographic support is designed to improve decision making by facilitating decisive action and reducing errors by providing clarity and certainty of comprehension. Kognitiv Spark says it was awarded the contract due in part to its reputation from ongoing work with the Canadian Army and the Royal Canadian Air Force. https://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/defence-watch/naval-contracts-and-technology-developments-on-display-at-cansec-2019

  • Canada awards contract to support Halifax-class ship maintenance

    30 juin 2020 | Local, Naval

    Canada awards contract to support Halifax-class ship maintenance

    As outlined in Canada's defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged, the Government of Canada is committed to equipping the Canadian Armed Forces with modern and capable equipment needed to support its operations. As outlined in Canada's defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged, the Government of Canada is committed to equipping the Canadian Armed Forces with modern and capable equipment needed to support its operations. This includes supporting the Royal Canadian Navy's (RCN) fleet of combat vessels to ensure they remain operationally effective and capable until the transition to its future fleet is complete. Today, the Government of Canada announced the award of an in-service support contract to Fleetway Inc. of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Valued at $72.6 million for the first six years, with options to extend for up to 22 years, this contract will provide a full range of technical data management and systems engineering support services for the RCN's fleet of Halifax-class ships. This contract will secure an expert team to store and manage thousands of critical ship documents, in addition to producing complex designs to support the installation of new equipment on board the ships. Their specialized knowledge and skills will make sure key information is up-to-date to support maintenance teams, and will enable the maintenance of the Halifax-class operational capability in support of CAF missions. Awarded as part of the National Shipbuilding Strategy, this contract will ensure that the RCN and supporting shipyards continue to have the technical data required to support ongoing ship maintenance during planned docking work periods, while also providing local economic benefits. Work for the contract began in April 2020, and will continue until the fleet is retired in the early 2040s. This contract is expected to sustain an estimated 140 Canadian jobs. Quotes “The women and men of the Canadian Armed Forces deserve the best equipment and tools available. By investing in our fleet of Halifax class frigates, we will be able to provide our members in uniform what they need to continue advancing peace and security around the world. Our government's defence policy, Strong, Secure, Engaged is delivering real results for Canadians and those who protect us.” The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National Defence “The National Shipbuilding Strategy continues to support the members of the Royal Canadian Navy and is reinvigorating the marine industry. This engineering service contract award to Fleetway Inc. of Halifax, Nova Scotia, will help provide our navy with safe, reliable ships to carry out their important work on behalf of the Government of Canada, while also creating jobs and generating significant economic benefits in the regions of Canada.” The Honourable Anita Anand, Minister of Public Services and Procurement “Our Halifax-class frigates remain the backbone of our Navy, enabling us to maintain our presence at sea both at home and abroad. As we continue to transition to our future fleet, it is essential that we continue to foster an environment that enables the RCN to keep our frigates floating, moving, and fighting. Fleetway Inc. brings world class technical data management and systems engineering support services which will help to ensure the RCN is ready to help, ready to lead and ready to fight.” Vice-Admiral Art McDonald, Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy “Nova Scotians are deeply proud of the women and men in the Canadian Armed Forces, and it's fitting that companies across the province are providing important support to the National Shipbuilding Strategy. This contract with Fleetway Inc. will keep skilled workers employed here at home, while supporting the Canadian Armed Forces in their work abroad.” Darren Fisher, Member of Parliament for Dartmouth-Cole Harbour Quick facts An initial contract of $72.6 million has been awarded to Fleetway Inc. for their services. It will be amended over the contract period based on the amount of work required for a total value of up to $552 million. This type of contract is fully compliant with our Sustainment Initiative, which ensures performance, value for money, flexibility, and economic benefits. This contract is one of more than 100 existing support contracts required to effectively support maintenance of the Halifax-class. This new in-service support contract will replace the services provided by Fleetway Inc. through the previous in-service support contract that will expire in October 2020. The new contract was awarded through an open, fair, and transparent procurement process. All technical documentation, manuals, and engineering drawings of ship systems/equipment must be regularly updated to track any changes following maintenance or upgrades. This information is used to help monitor the state of the ship, and is also used by maintenance crews to support ongoing work. Halifax-class ships monitor and control Canadian waters, defend Canada's sovereignty, facilitate large-scale search and rescue activities, and provide emergency assistance when needed. The ships operate with and integrate into the United Nations, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and coalitions of allied states in support of international peace and security operations. Introduced into service in the 1990s, the Canadian-built Halifax-class ships were recently modernized to remain operationally effective and relevant until the Canadian Surface Combatants enter into service. The Canadian Surface Combatants will replace the Halifax-class frigates and the retired Iroquois-class destroyers, and will ensure the RCN has modern and capable ships to monitor and defend Canada's waters, to continue to contribute to international naval operations for decades to come, and to rapidly deploy credible naval forces worldwide on short notice. https://www.miragenews.com/canada-awards-contract-to-support-halifax-class-ship-maintenance/

Toutes les nouvelles