3 août 2022 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité, Autre défense

10 Biggest DoD Contract Awards for July 2022

The 10 biggest contracts in July totaled $16,472,333,580, coming in at $10 billion less than June 2022 contracts.

https://news.clearancejobs.com/2022/08/02/10-biggest-dod-contract-awards-for-july-2022/

Sur le même sujet

  • ‘We need to be impatient’: Estonia’s No. 2 defense official dives into NATO priorities

    27 juin 2018 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR

    ‘We need to be impatient’: Estonia’s No. 2 defense official dives into NATO priorities

    By: Aaron Mehta  WASHINGTON ― As a border state with Russia, Estonia is well aware it is ground zero for any potential conflict between Moscow and NATO. The country is hitting the target of spending 2 percent of gross domestic product on defense, as requested by the alliance, and it is trying to modernize and build up its military capabilities. But like many nations in Europe, Estonia faces tough budgetary realities. Jonatan Vseviov, the permanent secretary of the Estonian Ministry of Defence, serves as the point man in directing those investments ― and per local news reports, he is on the short list to be the next ambassador to the United States. He talked to Defense News about those issues, as well as cyber challenges, during a June visit to Washington. I want to start with the big picture. Estonia is going to the summit in a couple of weeks. What are some of the priorities you are looking at? NATO is the cornerstone of our security. We expect a lot, not only from this summit but from NATO in general. NATO has been doing a lot of good work on defense and deterrence, bolstering up its presence in the Baltic states as well as in other regions in the eastern part of the alliance. I think that work needs to continue, and we expect a good number of decisions from the summit regarding the readiness of alliance forces, regarding reinforcement, the ability of the alliance to reinforce different regions. Obviously burden-sharing is going to be a key topic for NATO. We, as you might know, are one of the nations that contribute more than 2 percent of our GDP towards national defense. That is going to be a topic that will be discussed, I’m sure at length, at the summit. We are obviously aware of the fact that output is as important as input. And what I mean by that is that what you actually get for your defense dollars or euros is what, at the end of the day, matters. But there is no output without sufficient input. So both input and output are important. We need to be impatient. We need to ask for more and faster results. And we’ve been doing that for the past few years, and I think we are on the right track. One of the things that is expected to come out of the summit is standing up a new Atlantic Command. There’s been a lot of talk about something along those lines for the Baltic. Where is Estonia on the idea of a Baltic command? And can it happen, given how NATO resources are always constrained? When it comes to, for instance, reinforcement, there are several key elements to that. One is the readiness of all forces. Military mobility, which has become a very famous topic, which is obviously crucially important not only for the Baltic states but for the alliance in general. Discussion on pre-positioning, for instance, as part of the overall military mobility issue. Planning and exercise: It’s something that we often talk about in the context of defense and deterrence and then obviously also command structure. The NATO command structure has been and will be adapted to make it more fit for the time we’re in right now. There is also NATO force structure, which is crucially important. We do expect to see a divisional level or two-star HQ that would concentrate on the Baltic states. Discussions are underway between us and the Latvians and Danes to set up what is known as a Multinational Division North to complement what Multinational Division North East in Poland is already doing, to complement what the NATO force structure in general, as well as the command structure, is doing. So I think our command structure needs to evolve as the challenges evolve, and as the forces that we have available for our defense evolve. I think we’re on the right path; and the Multinational Division North ― not only is it necessary, it is also a decision that will come at a very, very right time. There are no silver bullets when it comes to security in general ― no silver bullets in policy and no silver bullets and capability. It’s a complex picture, so we need to concentrate on alliance relationships. Part of your job is to figure out investments for the money you’re spending ― the best way to build Estonian forces. What are some of the key investments that Estonia is making in the next couple years? And what are the areas that you’re hoping to start investing in the next couple of years? Most of our procurement, a good portion of procurement, is relatively small stuff, but more than 20 percent [of defense spending] is major equipment. Some of the examples: We’re mechanizing one of our battalions, which is a lengthy process. It started back in 2013 [and] will continue for the next few years. We are investing heavily in infrastructure not only for our own purposes but for the purposes of hosting allies. We are investing in ammunition. All of our acquisitions are targeted at making sure that we are not creating a hollow force. And the most important element of making sure that you don’t have a hollow force is ammunition, whether you have it or you don’t. So we’re spending a lot out of our procurement budget on making sure that we actually have the ammunition for the weapon systems that we have in the armed forces. Self-propelled howitzers, one of the latest developments that we are about to procure together with Finland, which is a good example of a joint procurement. We spent a lot of money on intelligence early warning both within the military as well as within the civilian sector, and we’re setting up a cyber command within the armed forces. We’ve been talking about cyber for a long time, we’ve been working on cyber. We are a very internet-dependent society, but only now are we creating a separate cyber command within the armed forces, so that will require additional investments. These are probably some of the key areas where we intend to spend our money on in the next few years. Since you mentioned it, let’s talk cyber. If Estonia is known for anything worldwide, it might well be cyber capabilities. You’re also home to the NATO Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence. Where is NATO on cyber? Is it getting where it needs to be or lagging behind? How concerned should the allies be about where they stand on cyber? I think we should always be concerned when it comes to cyber, and this is a very fast, developing domain. During the summit in Warsaw, for instance, the heads of state and government declared cyber to be one of the domains in security. I think that was a very important decision. In theory, it could trigger Article 5 now. Well, there is a good level of what I would call “constructive ambiguity“ built into the wording of the Washington Treaty and also Article 5. So Article 5 is what we decide to be Article 5, and that is very useful. We don’t want to give anybody a list of attacks that would trigger Article 5 because that would obviously mean that we automatically also create a list of potential attacks that would not trigger Article 5. Cyber is certainly a new domain. We are, I think, still scratching the surface of what it all means. It took us several years, perhaps even several decades, to think through, for instance, the air domain after airplanes arrived on the horizon and were used in major conflicts. We still didn’t have an air force until, in most cases, in the late 1940s or 1950s. So it will take us time to figure out how best to operate, how best to organize ourselves in the cyber domain. What is certain, though, is that the government alone cannot defend the cyber society, if you will. And will require not only a whole-of-government but really a whole-of-society approach. And secondly, obviously, the physical borders do not matter in cyber. So national initiatives are important, but they are nothing if there is no international component to our efforts. So figuring out all of this, thinking through the legal aspects, the policy aspects, is one of the things that the center of excellence in Tallinn does. We’re certain that we are again on the right path, in both NATO and the European Union, but I think it will take time for us to fully comprehend the best way to operate in this new domain. But how well, in your estimation, are the NATO allies integrating with cyber? I think there’s still a long way to go. Cyber tends to be a very sensitive area for obvious reasons, oftentimes also harnessed within intelligence organizations. But we’re making progress. There is more sharing, information sharing in NATO as well as between allies bilaterally, than there was a few years ago. So I think people are realizing that we need international cooperation; and without international cooperation, we simply cannot succeed in this new domain. https://www.defensenews.com/smr/nato-priorities/2018/06/26/we-need-to-be-impatient-estonias-no-2-defense-official-dives-into-nato-priorities/

  • India Increasingly Diversifying Its Arms, Weapons Purchases

    16 mars 2020 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    India Increasingly Diversifying Its Arms, Weapons Purchases

    India was the world's second-largest importer of arms and weapons during 2015-2019, according to a report from Swedish-based think tank Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, or SIPRI. Saudi Arabia ranked as the top arms importer. Saudi Arabia, India, Egypt, Australia and China accounted for 36% of all arms imports over that five-year period. However, while Russia remained India’s most important source of arms, Moscow's share of the Indian weapons market has dropped from 72% to 56% since the 2010-2014 period. Still, India accounted for 25% of all Russian arms exports. After Russia, Israel (14%) and France (12%) were the top sources of weapons for India. The U.S. was India’s second-largest arms supplier during 2010-14 as security ties between the two huge countries grew into a strategic partnership. “However, in 2015-19 India continued with its policy of supplier diversification, and imports of arms from the U.S. were 51 % lower than in 2010-14," the report said. India has received a bewildering and diverse array of military equipment from many sources, including Scanter-6000 naval surveillance radar from Denmark; Embraer ERJ-145 jets for early warning and control system from Brazil; ACTAS sonar systems from Germany; Super Rapid 76-mm naval guns from Italy; and K-9 Thunder 155- mm artillery guns from South Korea. Still, overall arms imports by India and Pakistan declined by 32% and 39%, respectively, between 2010-14 and 2015-19. "While both countries have long-standing aims to produce their [own] major arms, they remain largely dependent on imports and have substantial outstanding orders and plans for imports of all types of major arms," the SPIRI report said. https://www.ibtimes.com/india-increasingly-diversifying-its-arms-weapons-purchases-2939839

  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - September 6, 2019

    9 septembre 2019 | International, Aérospatial, Naval, Terrestre, C4ISR, Sécurité

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - September 6, 2019

    DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY Science Applications International Corp., doing business as SAIC, Fairfield, New Jersey, has been awarded a maximum $950,000,000 fixed-priced, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for a variety of Federal Supply Group 80 items. This was a competitive acquisition with three offers received. This is a three-year base contract with two, two-year option periods. Locations of performance are Pennsylvania, California, Georgia, Texas, New Jersey and Arizona, with a Sept. 5, 2022, performance completion date. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2022 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE8EG-19-D-0103). BOH Environmental LLC, Houston, Texas, has been awarded a maximum $70,000,000 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment contract for specialized shipping and storage containers. This was a sole source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a two year base contract with three one year option periods. Location of performance is Texas, with a Sept. 5, 2021, performance completion date. Using customers are Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and federal civilian agencies. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2021 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE8ED-19-D-0001). General Electric Co., Lynn, Massachusetts, has been awarded a maximum $14,874,824 firm-fixed-price delivery order (SPRPA1-19-F-QH06) against a five year basic ordering agreement (FA8122-19-G-0001) for engine exhaust frames. This was a sole source acquisition using justification 10 USC 2304(c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a 43 month contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Massachusetts, with an April 30, 2023, performance completion date. Using military service is Navy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 Navy working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Aviation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111-5098. Pomp’s Tire Service Inc., New Berlin, Wisconsin, has been awarded a maximum $11,465,836 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for wheel end assemblies. This was a competitive acquisition with two responses received. This is a three year contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Wisconsin, with a Sept. 6, 2022, performance completion date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2021 Army working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Land and Maritime, Warren, Michigan (SPRDL1-19-D-0159). NAVY DLT Solutions LLC, Herndon, Virginia (N66001-19-A-0045); EC America Inc., McLean, Virginia (N66001-19-A-0119); Carahsoft Technology Corp., Reston, Virginia (N66001-19-A-0120); RightStar Systems Inc.,Vienna, Virginia (N66001-19-A-0022); Belarc Inc., Maynard, Massachusetts (N66001-19-A-0118); and Immix Technologies, McLean, Virginia (N66001-19-A-0121), are being awarded a multiple-award, firm-fixed-price Department of Defense (DoD) Enterprise Software Initiative (ESI) blanket purchase agreement (BPA) in accordance with the firms’ General Services Administration (GSA) Federal Supply Schedule contracts. This BPA provides for purchase of this category’s software products and services by the DoD, U.S. intelligence community, and Coast Guard. The overall estimated value of this BPA is $820,450,000. The individual agreements are awarded for multi-reseller and multi-publisher providers of commercial-off-the-shelf information technology asset management software; software maintenance support; information technology professional services; and related services in support of DoD ESI in the enterprise software category. The resellers/software publishers are: DLT Solutions (Netscout and Tripwire); EC America (Riverbed, Netscout, Commvault and Microfocus Solutions); Carahsoft Technology (Safenet, Zscaler, Datalocker, Hytrust, Nlyte Microfocus Solutions, Beyond Trust, and Oblong); RightStar (Nlyte); Belarc Inc.; and Immix Technologies (BeyondTrust and Microfocus Solutions). The ordering period will be for a maximum of 10 years from Sept. 6, 2019, through July 11, 2029. The BPA is issued under DoD ESI in accordance with the policy and guidelines in the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement, Section 208.74. This BPA will not obligate funds at the time of award. Funds will be obligated as task orders using operations and maintenance (DoD) funds. Requirements will be competed among the awardees in accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulation 8.403-3(c)(2), and the successful contractor will receive firm fixed-price orders. This BPA was competitively procured via the GSA E-Buy web site among 679 vendors. Eight offers were received and eight were selected for award. Naval Information Warfare Center Pacific, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity. Lockheed Martin Corp., Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Co., Fort Worth, Texas, is being awarded a $266,203,768 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract special tooling and special test equipment in support of F-35 Lightning II aircraft for the Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and non-U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) participants. Work will be performed in Fort Worth, Texas (50.30 percent); San Diego, California (13.18 percent); Orlando, Florida (7.30 percent); El Segundo, California (5.45 percent); Samlesbury, United Kingdom (5.23 percent); Papendrecht, Netherlands (3.90 percent); Cheltenham, United Kingdom, (2.49 percent); Rochester, United Kingdom (2.29 percent); Nashua, New Hampshire (1.95 percent); Phoenix, Arizona (1.66 percent); Williston, Vermont (1.47 percent); Marietta, Georgia (1 percent); Palmdale, California (0.73 percent); East Aurora, New York (0.59 percent); Endicott, New York (0.55 percent); Kongsberg, Norway (0.43 percent); Marion, Virginia (0.34 percent); Hauppauge, New York (0.30 percent); Boulder, Colorado (0.24 percent); Owego, New York (0.23 percent); Sylmar, California (0.22 percent); Mississauga, Canada (0.06 percent); Avon, Massachusetts (0.04 percent); Montmorency, Australia (0.02 percent); Garden Grove, California (0.02 percent); and Ontario, California (0.01 percent). Work is expected to be completed by July 2022. Fiscal 2019 aircraft procurement (Air Force, Marine Corps, and Navy); and non-U.S. DoD participant funds in the amount of $266,203,768 are being obligated at time of award, none of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This modification combines purchases for the Air Force ($117,424,737; 44 percent); Navy ($80,246,876; 30 percent); Marine Corps ($36,674,989; 14 percent); and non-U.S. DoD participants ($31,857,166; 12 percent). The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity (N0001919C0074). Harris Corp., Roanoke, Virginia, is being awarded a maximum $249,000,000 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for the purchase of Squad Binocular Night Vision Goggle systems; spare and repair parts; contractor logistics support; and test article refurbishment. Work will be performed in Roanoke, Virginia, and is expected to be complete by September 2024.Fiscal 2019 procurement (Marine Corps) funds in the amount of $328,203 will be obligated at time of award and funds will expire the end of fiscal 2021.This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with six offers received. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Virginia, is the contracting activity (M67854-19-D-1501). Orbis Sibro Inc., Mount Pleasant, South Carolina (N39040-18-D-0003); Q.E.D. Systems Inc., Virginia Beach, Virginia (N39040-18-D-0004), Delphinus Engineering, Eddystone, Pennsylvania (N39040-18-D-0005); and Oceaneering Intl., Chesapeake, Virginia (N39040-18-D-0006), are being awarded a combined cumulative $37,884,834 cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple-award modification to exercise Option Period One to provide non-nuclear production support for U.S. naval submarine projects/repairs. The services under these contracts cover marine electrician, industrial fire watch/laborer, marine pipefitter, outside marine machinist, marine painter, weight handler, marine ship fitter, shipwright, welder, sheet metal, marine insulator, abrasive blaster, deck time setter and sound tile setter for upcoming submarine availabilities. Work will be performed in Kittery, Maine, and is expected to be completed by October 2020. No funding will be obligated at time of award. The Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Kittery, Maine, is the contracting activity. QED Systems Inc., Virginia Beach, Virginia (N64498-19-D-4006); and McKean Defense Group LLC, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (N64498-19-D-4032), are being awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity type contracts with cost-plus-fixed-fee and firm-fixed-price line items for engineering and technical services in support of Naval Surface Warfare Center Philadelphia Division (NSWCPD) Hull, Mechanical and Electrical (HM&E) systems Modernization Program. The contract being awarded to QED Systems Inc. (QED) will be awarded for $19,847,942, and the contract being awarded to McKean Defense Group LLC (McKean) will be awarded for $21,458,714. Work under the QED contract will be performed in Virginia Beach, Virginia (20 percent); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (20 percent); and various Navy port locations worldwide (60 percent). The work under the McKean contract will be performed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (40 percent); and various Navy port locations worldwide (60 percent). Work at all locations is expected to be completed by September 2024. Fiscal 2019 Navy working capital funding in the amount of $100,000 ($50,000 per contract) will be obligated at time of award via individual task orders and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. In accordance with 10 U.S. Code 2304(a), these contracts are the result of a full and open competitive procurement via the Federal Business Opportunities portal, in which three offers were received. The Naval Surface Warfare Center Philadelphia Division, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the contracting activity. American Scaffold, San Diego, California (N55236-16-D-0001); and W.V. Construction Co.,* Jamul, California (N55236-16-D-0002), are each being awarded firm-fixed-price contract modifications to exercise Option Year Four of their respective previously-awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, multiple-award contracts to provide scaffolding services to the Southwest Regional Maintenance Center’s Commercial Industrial Services code in support of Navy ships and other government vessels within a 50-mile radius of San Diego, California, which may include Oceanside, California. American Scaffold is being awarded $10,869,649, and W.V. Construction Co. is being awarded $18,892,889. Each contractor shall provide management, administrative and production services, materials, tools, equipment and required support to accomplish scaffolding on board U.S. naval ships and other government vessels within a 50-mile radius of San Diego, which may include Oceanside, California. Scaffolding shall include rolling scaffolds, suspended scaffolds and tube-and-clamp-type scaffolds. Work will be performed in San Diego, California, and is expected to be completed by October 2020. No funding is being obligated at time of award. The Southwest Regional Maintenance Center, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity. AS and D Inc., Beltsville, Maryland, is being awarded a $16,118,830 cost-plus-fixed-fee modification to previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract N00173-14-D-2016 for engineering and operational support for the command, control, data collection and mission management operations at Blossom Point Tracking Facility (BPTF). Work will be performed in Welcome, Maryland, and is expected to be complete by Aug. 26, 2020. Fiscal 2019 working capital funds (Navy) in the amount of $194,791; fiscal 2019 operation and maintenance funds (Navy) in the amount of $322,000; and fiscal 2019 research and development funds (Air Force) in the amount of $486,000, will be obligated at time of award. Contract funds in the amount of $516,791 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Contract funds in the amount of $486,000 will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. CORRECTION: The Sept. 5, 2019, announcement of a $9,500,000 delivery order (N68335-19-F-0393) against a previously awarded basic ordering agreement (N68335-16-G-0028) for Oceanit Laboratories Inc.*, Honolulu, Hawaii, included the incorrect contracting activity. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, New Jersey, is the contracting activity. CORRECTION: The Sept. 5, 2019, announcement of a $107,067,910 contract for Hexagon U.S. Federal Inc., Huntsville, Alabama (N00024-19-D-4114) included an incorrect completion date. The contract’s expected completion date is actually September 2024. ARMY BAE Systems Inc., York, Pennsylvania, was awarded a $268,990,416 modification (P00015) to contract W56HZV-18-C-0133 for Bradley production. Work will be performed in York, Pennsylvania, with an estimated completion date of March 31, 2021. Fiscal 2018 procurement of weapons and tracked combat vehicles funds in the amount of $268,990,416 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity. Heritage-M2C1 Joint Venture,* Delta Junction, Alaska, was awarded a $40,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract to execute sustainment, restoration, and modernization projects. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 12, 2024. U.S. Army 413th Contracting Support Battalion, Fort Wainwright, Alaska, is the contracting activity (W912D0-19-D-0005). Professional Contract Services Inc., Austin, Texas, was awarded a $26,688,913 modification (P00023) to contract W9124L-17-C-0005 for non-personal services to provide labor and supplies necessary to manage and operate the Fort Sill, Oklahoma, Directorate of Public Works. Work will be performed in Fort Sill, Oklahoma, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 30, 2022. Fiscal 2020 operations and maintenance Army funds in the amount of $26,688,913 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Mission and Installation Contracting Command, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, is the contracting activity. PAE Government Systems Inc., Arlington, Virginia, was awarded a $26,022,182 modification (P00014) to Foreign Military Sales (Afghanistan) W56HZV-17-C-0117 for the National Maintenance Strategy Ground Vehicle Support effort. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work will be performed in Kabul, Afghanistan, with an estimated completion date of March 1, 2020. Fiscal 2019 Afghanistan Security Forces, Army funds in the combined amount of $26,022,182 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity. Lynxnet LLC,* Suffolk, Virginia, was awarded an $18,207,432 firm-fixed-price contract to operate and maintain the command and control and infrastructure operations for headquarters, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command. One bid was solicited with one bid received. Work will be performed in Fort Belvoir, Virginia, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 18, 2020. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $8,490,400 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W911W4-19-C-0010). General Dynamics Land Systems Inc., Sterling Heights, Michigan, was awarded a $14,986,238 modification (P00071) to contract W56HZV-13-C-0319 to provide labor and vendor costs to furnish and install two new horizontal boring mill machines. Work will be performed in Lima, Ohio, with an estimated completion date of March 7, 2022. Fiscal 2019 procurement of weapons and tracked combat vehicles, Army funds in the amount of $14,986,238 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity. Northbank Civil and Marine Inc.,* Vancouver, Washington, was awarded a $13,075,000 modification (P00001) to contract W9127N-18-C-0081 for rehabilitation, structural, mechanical, and electrical upgrades to tainter gate. Work will be performed in Detroit, Oregon, with an estimated completion date of May 1, 2022. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, civil funds in the amount of $13,075,000 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland, Oregon, is the contracting activity. Motorola Solutions Inc., Linthicum Heights, Maryland, was awarded a $10,173,475 modification (P00002) to contract W52P1J-18-D-0036 to upgrade and expand the Pacific Japan and Korea land mobile radio system, connect sites to the current joint Japan land mobile radio system and to upgrade the Army backup core infrastructure in Japan. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of May 24, 2023. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois, is the contracting activity. DEFENSE INFORMATION SYSTEMS AGENCY The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory LLC (JHU/APL), Laurel, Maryland, was awarded a non-competitive, single-award, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for essential engineering, research, and/or development capabilities, in line with the core competencies established by the assistant secretary of defense for research and engineering, which designated JHU/APL as a University Affiliated Research Center (UARC). The place of performance will be at JHU/APL, Laurel, Maryland; and at the Defense Information Systems Agency, Fort Meade, Maryland. The contract ceiling value is $245,000,000, funded by multiple appropriation types. The minimum guarantee of $5,793,933 is satisfied through the issuance of the first task order in conjunction with the contract, which is funded by fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds. This is a sole source award, and as such, only one proposal was received. The ordering period is Sept. 30, 2019, through Sept. 29, 2024. The Defense Information Technology Contracting Organization, National Capital Region, is the contracting activity (HC1047-19-D-0001). Trace Systems Inc., Vienna, Virginia, was awarded a single-award, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract in support of providing the full range of Mission Partner Environment (MPE)-compatible support services and associated equipment to design, implement and operate the MPE enterprise. The contract ceiling value is $98,000,000. At the time of award, the minimum guarantee of $500 will be obligated using fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funding. All other funding will be obligated at the task order level. The places of performance will be at contiguous U.S. and outside continental U.S. designated MPE Services (MPE-S) support sites including Washington, District of Columbia; Fort Meade, Maryland; Air Force facilities in Fairfax, Virginia; U.S. Africa Command, Stuttgart, Germany; U.S. Central Command, Tampa, Florida; Kuwait; Bahrain; Afghanistan; U.S. Southern Command, Miami, Florida; U.S. Northern Command, Colorado Spring, Colorado; U.S. Special Operations Command, Tampa, Florida; Joint Communication Support Element, Tampa, Florida; and U.S. Forces Korea, Youngsan Air Base, Osan Air Base, Kunsan Air Base, and Camp Humphries. Additional places of performance are to be determined based on customer requirements and real world events. The specific place(s) of performance will be specified in individual task orders. A competitive solicitation utilizing full and open competition was the basis for the single-award contract. Proposals were solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website and four proposals were received. The ordering period is five years from the date of contract award. The Defense Information Technology Contracting Organization, National Capital Region, is the contracting activity (HC1047-19-D-4002). AIR FORCE Alliant Techsystems Operations LLC - ATK Tactical Propulsion and Control, Rocket Center, West Virginia, has been awarded a $109,929,339 firm-fixed-price contract for Hard Target Void Sensing Fuzes (HTVSF). This contract provides for the full rate production of Lot 2 and Lot 3 HTVSFs, as well as spares, trainers, and support. Work will be performed in Rocket Center, West Virginia, and is expected to be complete by July 31, 2023. This award is the result of a sole source acquisition. Fiscal 2017, 2018, and 2019 ammunition procurement funds in the amount of $109,929,339 are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Hill Air Force Base, Utah, is the contracting activity (FA8213-19-C-0038). Bowhead Cybersecurity Solutions & Services LLC, Alexandria, Virginia, has been awarded a $19,689,460 firm-fixed-price contract for the Air Force National Tactical Integration Program. This contract provides for real-time, two-way interactive information exchange among the combined/joint force air component commander, other joint and Air Force customers, and the national intelligence community. Work will be performed at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas; Fort Meade, Maryland; Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio; Scott Air Force Base, Illinois; Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana; Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida; Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona; Fort Gordon, Georgia; Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina; Langley Air Force Base, Virginia; Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida; Hurlburt Field, Florida; Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii; and Creech Air Force Base, Nevada. The performance period includes four option periods with expected completion by Jan. 30, 2024. This award is the result of a sole source set-aside acquisition. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funding in the amount of $1,446,615 are being obligated at time of the award. The Acquisition Management & Integration Center-Detachment 2, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, is the contracting activity (FA7037-19-C-A009). *Small Business https://www.defense.gov/Newsroom/Contracts/Contract/Article/1954307/source/GovDelivery/

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