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  • ASSESSING THE DAMAGE FROM CANADA’S FIGHTER REPLACEMENT FIASCO: NEW MLI REPORT

    May 10, 2019 | Local, Aerospace

    ASSESSING THE DAMAGE FROM CANADA’S FIGHTER REPLACEMENT FIASCO: NEW MLI REPORT

    OTTAWA, ON (May 6, 2019): In a hard-hitting new Macdonald-Laurier Institute report, MLI Senior Fellow Richard Shimooka takes a critical look at the government's approach to replacing Canada's aging fleet of CF-18 fighters. In the report, titled The Catastrophe: Assessing the Damage from Canada's Fighter Replacement Fiasco, he argues that Ottawa's performance on this file mirrors the SNC-Lavalin Scandal and the Mark Norman Affair. “At their heart, these two incidents represent attempts by the Liberal government to circumvent established processes to meet their partisan interests,” Shimooka explains. “This description is just as apt for the fighter program.” Canada is a participant in the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Program that has been developing the F-35s. These fighter jets were slotted to replace the RCAF's aging CF-18s, but after the program was mired in political scandal under the previous government, the Liberal government changed plans. “During the 2015 election campaign, the Liberal Party promised not to buy the F-35 jets, but instead to use a competition to identify and subsequently purchase a lower-cost competitor... this decision proved to be impossible, unethical, and potentially illegal,” writes Shimooka. From billions of dollars being wasted on a procurement process to fix a contrived capability gap to potentially threatening Canada's defence relationship with the US, the report finds that political interests have consistently been put above Canada's defence needs. Shimooka argues that “the decisions made [regarding fighter jet replacement] were purely for reasons of political interest: not a single one could be claimed as being in the country's national interest.” The “fiasco,” as Shimooka describes it, has caught the attention of both Canada's Office of the Auditor General (OAG) and senior US officials. According to documents never before seen by the public, the OAG had specifically cautioned the government against its chosen course of purchasing Australian Hornets as an interim measure in a draft report – and the final OAG report was heavily revised to obscure that recommendation. Worse still, letters from US officials reveal that “resentment and distrust towards the government of Canada had grown, particularly within the US Air Force.” These letters, which again have not been made public until now, outline the significant strategic and economic benefits that have already been accrued from being part of the JSF Program. Yet they also contain an implicit (but clear) threat that Canada could be kicked out of the Program – if Ottawa continues with its current policy of trying to obtain guaranteed industrial benefits that, by their very nature, are not allowed under the JSF Program. “There was a complete lack of logic of Canada's policy, which seemed to ignore basic facts about membership in the JSF program, including clear advantages in cost and capability that the F-35 provided.” Despite these persistent, high-level issues with the government's chosen approach on the fighter jet replacement, the file has avoided serious public scrutiny. Shimooka finds that this happened in large part due to the successful gag orders levelled by the government. “The government has also suppressed negative viewpoints within and outside the Department of National Defence, allegedly up to and including the deletion of portions of Memos to Cabinet that highlighted why certain decisions should not be taken.” Moving forward on the file may prove to be difficult; defence procurement woes have plagued Canada since Confederation, and the issues with the fighter jet replacement are deeper than just purchasing the right aircraft. Worse still, Shimooka says that the brunt of the burden of consistently poor decision-making in Ottawa will be borne by the RCAF itself. “While the negative consequences are clear for Canada as a whole," Shimooka explains, "no community has felt the impact more than the RCAF. As a result of this government's policies, its ability to conduct its most basic function, the defence of Canadian sovereignty and that of our allies, is diminishing rapidly.” “It is a sad state of affairs.” To read the commentary in full, click here. https://www.macdonaldlaurier.ca/assessing-damage-canadas-fighter-replacement-fiasco-new-mli-report/

  • Canada changing rules of competition for $19B fighter jet fleet to allow consideration of F-35: sources

    May 10, 2019 | Local, Aerospace

    Canada changing rules of competition for $19B fighter jet fleet to allow consideration of F-35: sources

    David Pugliese, Ottawa Citizen The Canadian government is changing the terms of the $19-billion competition to replace its aging fleet of fighter jets to allow the U.S. to enter its F-35 stealth fighter. The changes will allow for a more flexible approach in determining the value of the benefits bidders offer to Canadian defence firms, industry sources say, and come after a series of discussions with the U.S. government and threats by the Pentagon to withdraw the jet from consideration. Under the current terms, bidders were required to offer industrial benefits to Canada as part of the competition. That system, which would have disadvantaged the F-35, will now be amended, sources say. But those companies that do guarantee work for Canadian firms will receive more consideration under the new rules. U.S. officials had warned that the agreement Canada signed to be a partner nation in Lockheed Martin's development of the F-35 prohibits those partner nations from imposing requirements for industrial benefits in fighter jet competitions. “We cannot participate in an offer of the F-35 weapon system where requirements do not align with the F-35 Partnership,” U.S. Navy Vice-Adm. Mathias Winter told Canadian officials in a letter sent in December. Under the agreement, companies from the partner nations are eligible to compete for work on the F-35s, and contracts are awarded on a best-value basis. Over the last 12 years, Canadian firms have earned more than $1.3 billion in contracts to build F-35 parts. In a statement issued last week, Lockheed Martin Canada said that hundreds of Canadian jobs had been created by work on the jet. The firm noted that it continued to provide feedback to the U.S. government, which is involved with Canada in government-to-government discussions on the fighter jet program. The competition to win the Canadian contract for a fleet of 88 new fighter jets was launched on Dec. 12, 2017 and at this point four fighter jets are expected to be considered. Those include the F-35, the Super Hornet, the Eurofighter Typhoon and the Gripen. The Canadian government expects to award the contract in 2022. A request for bids for the new jets was scheduled to be released in conjunction with the CANSEC defence trade show in Ottawa at the end of the month, with bids to be evaluated by 2021. However, the government now admits that schedule is risky. In its latest update on major equipment projects the Department of National Defence said “The approved schedule is considered very aggressive,” and that “The project team is managing a number of risks which have the potential to impact schedule.” The document doesn't outline the specific risks but DND officials have acknowledged that figuring out how to deal with industrial benefits linked to the project could cause delays. The delivery of the first of the jets is expected in the mid-2020s, with the full capability available in the early 2030s, according to the DND document. The plan to purchase used Australian F-18s in the interim, the first already delivered, is also outlined in the document. It noted the final delivery of those jets is set for the end of 2021. https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/canada-changing-rules-of-competition-for-19b-fighter-jet-fleet-to-allow-consideration-of-f-35-sources

  • Feds look to ease requirements for fighter-jet makers after U.S. complaints

    May 10, 2019 | Local, Aerospace

    Feds look to ease requirements for fighter-jet makers after U.S. complaints

    By Lee Berthiaume, The Canadian Press OTTAWA — The federal government is planning to loosen its industrial requirements for fighter-jet makers in the $19-billion competition to replace Canada's aging CF-18s. The planned modification follows recent U.S. complaints that the previous criteria violated Canada's obligations as one of nine partner countries in the development of the F-35, one of the small handful of planes expected in the competition. Yet the proposed change has sparked complaints from some of the companies whose planes will be competing against the F-35, who say the new approach goes too far in the other direction. Canada has long required companies bidding on major defence contracts to commit to re-investing back into the country, with those unable to make such a contractual commitment seeing their bids tossed out. But in a presentation to companies on Thursday, the government said it plans to allow bids missing such a commitment in the fighter-jet competition — they will be just docked points in the assessment. The plan is intended to maximize the number of bids in the competition to buy 88 new jets while still aiming for the largest-possible economic spinoffs, a senior government official told The Canadian Press. The U.S. had threatened not to enter the F-35 into the competition if the requirement wasn't changed, noting that under the partnership agreement signed in 2006, companies in each member country instead compete for work. The threat was contained in a letter sent to the government from the head of the Pentagon's F-35 office in December and published in a report from the Macdonald-Laurier Institute think tank on Monday. Canada has contributed roughly $500 million over the past 20 years toward developing the F-35, while Canadian companies have won nearly $1.5 billion in contracts associated with the stealth fighter. Canada will also be able to buy the plane for less than non-members. The proposed new process will see the government evaluate bids on a scale, with 60 per cent of the points based on the plane's capability, 20 per cent on its full lifetime costs and the remaining 20 per cent on industrial benefits to Canada. Bidders can still guarantee that they will re-invest back into Canada if their jet wins the competition and get all 20 points - which is the likely approach for Boeing's Super Hornet, Eurofighter's Typhoon and Saab's Gripen. But those that can't make such a commitment will be asked to establish "industrial targets," lay out a plan for achieving those targets and sign a non-binding agreement promising to make all efforts to achieve them. The government will study those plans and assign points based on risk. This is the likely approach for Lockheed Martin and the F-35, which the U.S. has said could provide Canadian companies with billions in work over the next 50 years. The planned new approach has already stirred complaints from some of Lockheed Martin's competitors, who question why the F-35 should get points if the company can't guarantee re-investment back into Canada. There are also concerns about how the government will decide how risky plans to achieve "industrial targets" actually are, with one industry source saying that question is entirely subjective. Bidders were also told Thursday that the actual launch of the competition has been delayed until mid-July. Government officials had previously said they hoped the starting gun would be fired by the end of the month. Lee Berthiaume, The Canadian Press https://www.nationalnewswatch.com/2019/05/09/feds-ease-industrial-requirements-for-fighter-jet-makers-after-u-s-complaints/

  • US clears $3 billion Apache sale for Qatar

    May 10, 2019 | International, Aerospace

    US clears $3 billion Apache sale for Qatar

    By: Aaron Mehta WASHINGTON — The U.S. State Department has cleared a potential foreign military sale deal of 24 AH-64E Apache attack helicopters, in a deal that could be worth up to $3 billion. The proposed sale would double Qatar's previous procurement of AH-64Es, which are used for “close air support, armed reconnaissance, and anti-tank warfare missions,” according to a notice posted on the Defense Security Cooperation Agency's website Thursday. “The helicopters will provide a long-term defensive and offensive capability to the Qatar peninsula as well as enhance the protection of key oil and gas infrastructure and platforms.” The notification is not a guarantee of a final sale. Congress can still weigh in, and once cleared by the Hill, negotiations between customer and supplier often lead to different prices or quantities. Included in the sale are the 24 helicopter bodies, 52 T700-GE-701D engines; 26 AN/ASQ-170 Modernized Target Acquisition and Designation Sight (MTADS); 26 AN/AAQ-11 Modernized Pilot Night Vision Sensors; 2,500 AGM-114R Hellfire missiles; 28 M230 30mm automatic chain guns, as well as other equipment and training. Primary work will be done at Boeing's Mesa, Ariz., facility, Lockheed Martin's Orlando, Fla,, location and General Electric's Cincinnati, OH facility, as well as other locations. There are no known industrial offsets in the deal. https://www.defensenews.com/global/mideast-africa/2019/05/09/us-clears-3-billion-apache-sale-for-qatar

  • France: C'est confirmé, le Charles-de-Gaulle aura bien un petit frère

    May 10, 2019 | International, Naval

    France: C'est confirmé, le Charles-de-Gaulle aura bien un petit frère

    Florence Parly, ministre des Armées, a annoncé ce mercredi 8-Mai, sur BFMTV et la radio RMC, que la France travaille sur un projet de porte-avions. La France ne possède qu'un seul porte-avions, le Charles-de-Gaulle, actuellement en mission dans l'océan Indien, pour 18 mois. "Nous travaillons sur une nouvelle génération de porte-avions a déclaré Florence Parly au micro de Jean-Jacques-Bourdin. Puisque le porte-avions (le Charles-de-Gaulle) aujourd'hui déployé dans l'océan Indien est un élément extrêmement fédérateur y compris au plan européen". La ministre française des Armées a en revanche jugé prématurée la proposition allemande d'un porte-avions européen, soulignant que cela nécessitait un commandement européen compliqué à mettre en œuvre. " Je crois qu'on n'en est pas encore tout à fait là." "Il faut réfléchir d'abord à ce que pourraient être les conditions d'emploi d'un porte-avions européen", a observé Florence Parly. "Une chose est de le construire à plusieurs, une autre de le mettre sous un commandement européen. Là, c'est beaucoup plus compliqué", a-t-elle ajouté. Rappelons que le Charles-de-Gaulle a quitté son port d'attache toulonnais fin 2018 pour une mission de 4 mois. Long de 261,5 mètres, ce vaisseau-amiral français peut emporter 40 aéronefs, dont 30 avions Rafale. Sa construction avait débuté en 1987 pour remplacer le Clemenceau. https://www.nicematin.com/politique/cest-confirme-le-charles-de-gaulle-aura-bien-un-petit-frere-380954

  • Swiss Air 2030 program clears hurdle of external review — with tweaks

    May 10, 2019 | International, Aerospace

    Swiss Air 2030 program clears hurdle of external review — with tweaks

    By: Sebastian Sprenger COLOGNE, Germany — Switzerland should package the proposed buy of 40 or so combat aircraft as a unique track under the $8 billion Air 2030 program, according to a new study commissioned by the defense ministry. This, the study argues, will increase the chance the purchase will be approved in an eventual national referendum. The conclusion is part of a report by former Swiss astronaut Claude Nicollier, who was tasked earlier this year by the new defense minister, Viola Amherd, to critique the envisioned air-defense reboot. The recommendation speaks to the government's strategy of seeing the aircraft acquisition through a circuitous decision-making process in a country with a strong plebiscitary tradition. Buying the aircraft makes up the lion's share of the Air 2030 program, at roughly $6 billion. The purchase of ground-based, air-defense weaponry accounts for the rest. The current Cabinet plan is to pursue the aircraft and ground-based, anti-missile weaponry as a package deal, allowing the populace to vote on both segments en bloc in the likely event that a referendum is called. But advocates for new aircraft, which includes Nicollier, contend that the need for new planes is so great that the decision should be teed up without any distractions whatsoever. “In my opinion, it is wise to choose this track for the combat aircraft, after the past experiences of our direct democracy,” Nicollier wrote in his report. “It is ... useless to mix another weapon system to this next battle, which concerns only the plane and which promises, as usual, to be much more emotional than professional.” Nicollier's comment refers to a previous Swiss decision about replacing parts of its aging combat aircraft inventory, composed of F-5 Tiger and F-18 planes, five years ago this month. At the time, the population voted down the government's pick of the Saab Gripen E following a grueling campaign by advocates and opponents that quickly left the realm of national security arguments. Some believe that putting a specific aircraft model out for a referendum contributed to the program's defeat, a mistake that the defense ministry wants to avoid at all costs this time around. According to a statement on the ministry's website, Nicollier's analysis, submitted in French, recommends that the population should get the chance to vote on the aircraft acquisition only in general terms, leaving the choice of aircraft model up to the government later on. The competitors for the aircraft procurement are Airbus with the Eurofighter Typhoon, Lockheed Martin with the F-35A, Boeing with the F-18 Super Hornet and Dassault with the Rafale. Saab and its Gripen E also are taking another go at it. Nicollier's report will probably be seen as good news for the industry contenders. For one, it supports the idea that Switzerland must quickly act to modernize its abilities to control the national airspace at a time when traditional geopolitical fronts in Europe are becoming murky. In addition, it proposes a path for the aircraft acquisition that appears mindful of lessons learned from the Gripen debacle of 2014. Cabinet officials are expected to debate the Nicollier report in the weeks ahead and determine how its recommendations will shape the Air 2030 program, a Swiss defense ministry official told Defense News. https://www.defensenews.com/global/europe/2019/05/09/swiss-air2030-program-clears-hurdle-of-external-review-with-tweaks

  • Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - May 9, 2019

    May 10, 2019 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security, Other Defence

    Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - May 9, 2019

    AIR FORCE United Launch Services, Centennial, Colorado, has been awarded a $149,376,775 firm-fixed-price modification (P00002) to previously awarded contract FA8811-19-C-0002 for National Security Space Launch Delta IV heavy launch services. This modification provides for launch vehicle production services for National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) Launch Mission Two, the second of three planned NRO launch missions under this contract. Work will be performed in Centennial, Colorado; Decatur, Alabama; and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, and is expected to be complete by December 2022. This modification brings the total cumulative face value of the contract to $449,813,010. Fiscal 2019 missile procurement funds in the amount of $139,028,436 are being obligated at the time of award. Space and Missile Systems Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base, California, is the contracting activity. Systems & Technology Research,* Woburn, Massachusetts, has been awarded a $28,680,552 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract for research, development, operations and maintenance. This contract provides for the Dynamic Exploitation Modeling for Operational Systems (DEMOS) program, with an objective to implement automated tools for generating indications and warning and transition prototype systems to operational end users for a variety of missions. Work will be performed in Woburn, Massachusetts, and is expected to be complete by July 26, 2023. Fiscal 2018 and 2019 (Office of the Secretary of Defense) research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $4,955,000; and fiscal 2019 (Defense Intelligence Agency) operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $700,000 are being obligated at the time of award. Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8650-19-C-1030). UPDATE: An $18,300,000 contract announced on March 28, 2019, to Merex Aircraft Co. Inc., Camarillo, California (FA8212-19-D-0001), for the acquisition of A-10 flap assemblies has been terminated due to a bid protest. CORRECTION: The contract announced on May 2, 2019, for Engility Corp., Andover, Massachusetts (FA8650-19-C-6024), for research and development, included an incorrect award amount, as did a subsequent correction. The correct award amount is $58,296,527. DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY Engility Corp., Chantilly, Virginia was awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (HHM402-19-D-0003) with a maximum ceiling value of $106,000,000 for exploitation management support services to the Defense Intelligence Agency's (DIA) National Media Exploitation Center (NMEC), Bethesda, Maryland. This contract has a five-year base ordering period and five one-year options, with a June 1, 2019, start date and a potential completion date of May 31, 2029. Through this award, DIA will procure document and media management, program support, and related intelligence support services for NMEC. Work is to be performed in the National Capital Region. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $5,474,490 are being obligated for a cost-plus fixed-fee task order at the time of award. This was a competitive unrestricted acquisition and four offers were received. The Virginia Contracting Activity, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity. NAVY Airborne Tactical Advantage Co. LLC, Newport News, Virginia, is awarded $55,611,547 for modification P00018 to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price, cost reimbursable contract (N00019-15-D-0026). This modification exercises the fourth option year in support of the Contracted Air Services program. This modification provides contractor-owned and operated Type III high subsonic and Type IV supersonic aircraft to Navy fleet customers for a wide variety of airborne threat simulation capabilities. Work will be performed in Newport News, Virginia (44 percent); Point Mugu, California (37 percent); and various locations outside the continental U.S. (19 percent), and is expected to be completed in May 2020. No funds are being obligated at time of award, funds will be obligated on individual orders as they are issued. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. B3 Enterprises LLC,* Woodbridge, Virginia (N44255-17-D-4011); Iron Mike - Bristol JV, LLC,* Centennial, Colorado (N44255-17-D-4012); Macnak Construction LLC,* Lakewood, Washington (N44255-17-D-4013); Tompco Inc.,* Seabeck, Washington (N44255-17-D-4014); and Veterans Northwest Construction LLC,* Seattle, Washington (N44255-17-D-4015), are awarded a firm-fixed-price modification under previously awarded indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract to increase the maximum not-to-exceed amount by $50,000,000 for design-build or design-bid-build construction projects located primarily within the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Northwest (NW) area of operations (AO). The work to be performed provides for new construction, renovation, alteration, demolition and repair work by design-build or design-bid-build of facilities. Types of projects include, but are not limited to administrative and industrial facilities, housing renovation, child care centers, lodges, recreation/fitness centers, retail complexes, warehouses, housing offices, community centers, commercial and institutional buildings, manufacturing and industrial buildings and other similar facilities. With the award of this modification, the value of this contract is now $149,000,000. All work on this contract will be performed primarily within the NAVFAC NW AO which includes Washington (92 percent); Alaska (2 percent); Oregon (2 percent); Idaho (1 percent); Montana (1 percent); Wyoming (1 percent); and work for this contract may also be performed in the remainder of the U.S. (1 percent). The term of the contract is not to exceed 60 months, with an expected completion date of April 2022. No funds will be obligated at the time of award and no funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. Funds will be obligated as task orders are issued. Task orders have been and will be primarily funded by military construction (Navy); operations and maintenance (Navy); and Navy working capital funds. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website with 16 proposals received. These five contractors may compete for task orders under the terms and conditions of the awarded contract. NAVFAC NW, Silverdale, Washington, is the contracting activity. DAV-Force Inc.,* Norman, Oklahoma (N0003919D0026); GLOTECH Inc.,* Rockville, Maryland (N0003919D0027); INDUS Technology Inc.,* San Diego, California (N0003919D0028); and North American Consulting Services Inc.,* Point Pleasant, West Virginia (N0003919D0029), are each awarded a $40,433,013 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, hybrid, firm-fixed-price, cost-reimbursable-type, multiple award contract for communications security accounting and special inventory manager support services in support of U.S. security assistance and security cooperation programs. Work will be performed in various overseas locations based on the requirement for each task order placed. The ordering period is five years with an expected completion date of May 2024. Foreign military sales funds in the amount of a minimum of $5,000 per awardee will be obligated at the time of award via a task order to each awardee. Funds in the amount of $10,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured with small business proposals solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command e-Commerce Central website, with seven offers received. The Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, San Diego, California, is the contracting activity. Great Eastern Group Inc.,* Fort Lauderdale, Florida, is awarded a $12,220,564 firm-fixed-price contract with reimbursable elements, for logistic support of SBX-1 by the Offshore Support Vessel MV Hercules. This contract includes a one-year base period with three one-year option periods and an 11-month option period, which, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to $48,189,426. Work will be performed in Dutch Harbor, Alaska, and is expected to be completed by July 2020. If all options are exercised, work will continue through June 25, 2024. Research development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $3,734,457 are obligated at the time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was solicited as a small business set-aside with more than 50 companies solicited via the Federal Business Opportunities website and six offers received. The Navy's Military Sealift Command, Norfolk, Virginia, is the contracting activity (N3220519C3500). Rolls-Royce Corp., Indianapolis, Indiana, is awarded an $8,622,670 firm-fixed-price modification to previously-awarded contract N00019-17-C-0081. This modification is for the procurement of 10 MT7 marine turbine installation parts kit shipsets for the Landing Craft, Air Cushion (LCAC) 100 Class craft. This procurement is in support of the Ship-to-Shore Connector Program. An MT7 installation parts kit is one “shipset” (craft) consisting of four engine intakes, two right-hand engine exhausts and two left-hand engine exhausts. Work to be performed includes production of the installation parts kit shipsets and delivery to Textron Marine and Land Systems for the assembly of the LCAC 100 Class craft. Work will be performed in Indianapolis, Indiana, and is expected to be completed by January 2021. Fiscal 2017 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy) funding in the amount of $1,724,534; and fiscal 2018 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy) funding in the amount of $6,898,136 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity, working in conjunction with the Naval Air Systems Command. Northrop Grumman Systems Corp., Woodland Hills, California, was awarded $7,203,829 for modification P00001 to a previously awarded firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract (N0001919D0025). This modification provides for the procurement of up to 42 additional technical refresh mission computers for AH-1Z aircraft, including trainer units and spare units for the government of Bahrain under the Foreign Military Sales program. Work will be performed in Salt Lake City, Utah (55 percent); Baltimore, Maryland (25 percent); and Woodland Hills, California (20 percent), and is expected to be completed in December 2023. No funds will be obligated at the time of award; funds will be obligated on individual delivery orders as they are issued. The Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Maryland, is the contracting activity. (Awarded April 29, 2019) ARMY Ripple Effect Communications Inc.,* Rockville, Maryland, was awarded a $38,513,810 modification (P00005) to contract W81XWH-17-D-0003 for program administration and technical support services. Bids were solicited via the internet with 18 received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of May 22, 2022. U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity, Fort Detrick, Maryland, is the contracting activity. IronMountain Solutions Inc.,* Huntsville, Alabama, was awarded a $22,705,832 time-and-materials Foreign Military Sales (Afghanistan, Bahrain, United Arab Emirates, Tunisia, Thailand, Taiwan, Sweden, Egypt, Jordan, Latvia, Mexico, Saudi Arabia and Slovakia) contract for technical support services. Bids were solicited via the internet with three received. Work will be performed in Huntsville, Alabama, with an estimated completion date of May 8, 2020. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test, and evaluation; operations and maintenance, Army; and other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $22,705,832 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W31P4Q-17- R-0001). Tocci Building Corp, Woburn, Massachusetts, was awarded a $20,612,338 firm-fixed-price contract for replacement family housing design and build. Bids were solicited via the internet with six received. Work will be performed in Natick, Massachusetts, with an estimated completion date of May 10, 2021. Fiscal 2015 and 2018 Army family housing construction funds in the amount of $20,612,338 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Concord, Massachusetts, is the contracting activity (W912WJ-18-R-0006). Tsay/Ferguson-Williams LLC,* San Juan Pueblo, New Mexico, was awarded a $17,982,082 cost-plus-award-fee contract for operations and maintenance services. Bids were solicited via the internet with 13 received. Work will be performed in Fort Stewart, Georgia, with an estimated completion date of Jan. 31, 2020. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $4,579,182 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Mission and Installation Contracting Command, Fort Stewart, Georgia, is the contracting activity (W912WJ-19-C-0011). Quantitech Inc.,* Huntsville, Alabama, was awarded a $16,026,683 time-and-materials Foreign Military Sales (Afghanistan, Bahrain, United Arab Emirates, Tunisia, Thailand, Taiwan, Sweden, Egypt, Jordan, Latvia, Mexico, and Slovakia) contract for support services. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Huntsville, Alabama, with an estimated completion date of May 8, 2020. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test, and evaluation; operations and maintenance, Army; and other procurement, Army funds in the amount of $16,026,683 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, is the contracting activity (W31P4Q-16-R-0010). WASHINGTON HEADQUARTERS SERVICES Cherokee Nation Environmental Solutions LLC, Tulsa, Oklahoma, has been awarded a $15,100,000 firm-fixed-price contract. The contract expands existing mission critical chilled water distribution to provide mission critical cooling to mission critical rooms and equipment. The contract acquires design-build construction of a redundant chilled water loop in the Pentagon A-ring tunnels, risers for lateral distribution of chilled water, and a new secondary distribution pump. Work performance will take place at the Pentagon, Arlington, Virginia. Fiscal 2015 military construction funds in the amount of $15,100,000 are being awarded. This contract was a sole-source acquisition. The expected completion date is June 10, 2021. Washington Headquarters Services, Arlington, Virginia, is the contracting activity (HQ0034-19-C-0043). *Small business https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1843457/source/GovDelivery/

  • UK Access defence science and technology research

    May 10, 2019 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security, Other Defence

    UK Access defence science and technology research

    You can access defence science and technology research via our central repository, and submit your own research. Contents Access Dstl's published research Access wider defence science and technology research through Athena Find out about the latest research reports added to Athena Request full-text research reports Submit your research report to Athena Policy for re-use of information https://www.gov.uk/guidance/access-defence-science-and-technology-research

  • Canadian Admiral: Kids Won't Join the Navy if Ships Don't Have Wi-Fi

    May 9, 2019 | Local, Naval

    Canadian Admiral: Kids Won't Join the Navy if Ships Don't Have Wi-Fi

    Military.com | By Gina Harkins The next generation of Canadian sailors has grown up with phones in their hands, and they're not likely to give up their connectivity for life on the high seas. When working with industry partners designing the technology needed on future Royal Canadian Navy ships, leaders are putting internet connection high on the list, Rear Adm. Casper Donovan, director of the navy's general future ship capabilities, said Tuesday. "We have sailors who've grown up in a digital world -- they are digital," Donovan said at the annual Sea-Air-Space expo near Washington, D.C. "... When they embark on a Canadian surface combatant and we tell them to lock up their phone, they won't just go 'OK.' "They won't join the navy," he said. https://www.military.com/daily-news/2019/05/08/canadian-admiral-kids-wont-join-navy-if-ships-dont-have-wi-fi.html

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