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February 22, 2024 | Local, Security

Minister Blair participates in Fifth North American Defence Ministerial meeting

Today, the Honourable Bill Blair, Minister of National Defence, met virtually with U.S. Secretary of Defense, Lloyd J. Austin III, Mexico’s Secretary of Defence (SEDENA), General Luis Cresencio Sandoval González, and Mexico’s Secretary of the Navy (SEMAR), Admiral José Rafael Ojeda Durán, for the fifth trilateral meeting of North American Defence Ministers (NADM).

https://www.canada.ca/en/department-national-defence/news/2024/02/minister-blair-participates-in-fifth-north-american-defence-ministerial-meeting.html

On the same subject

  • Government of Canada awards contract for inspection, repair and overhaul of service boats

    January 11, 2021 | Local, Naval

    Government of Canada awards contract for inspection, repair and overhaul of service boats

    NEWS PROVIDED BY Public Services and Procurement Canada Jan 08, 2021, 14:11 ET GATINEAU, QC, Jan. 8, 2021 /CNW/ - Through the National Shipbuilding Strategy, the Government of Canada is committed to providing members of the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) with safe and effective vessels required to protect Canadian sovereignty, while creating jobs and generating economic benefits for communities across Canada. Following an open and competitive process, Public Services and Procurement Canada, on behalf of National Defence, has awarded a $16.5-million contract to Zodiac Hurricane Technologies Inc., from Delta, British Columbia, for inspection, repair and overhaul work, on an as-required basis, on inflatable rubber boats and rigid (hull) inflatable boats. Inflatable boats provide a critical operational capability to all elements of the CAF. They are used to support a wide range of missions, including search and rescue, dive support, fishery patrols, boarding party operations, and the transfer of personnel and equipment. The essential maintenance and support services provided by this contract will ensure the CAF's fleet of inflatable boats remains capable of meeting current and future operational demands. This contract was awarded under the repair, refit and maintenance component of the National Shipbuilding Strategy, which provides economic opportunities for shipyards and suppliers across Canada. The contract will help create or maintain up to 23 jobs. Quotes "The Government of Canada remains firmly committed to the National Shipbuilding Strategy, and we are working hard to ensure that it continues to deliver important benefits for Canada. The strategy continues to provide meaningful opportunities for the Canadian marine industry, generating jobs and opportunities from coast to coast to coast." The Honourable Anita Anand Minister of Public Services and Procurement "The Canadian Armed Forces fleet of inflatable boats increases our reach and effectiveness during a wide range of operations at home and abroad. This contract will provide critical maintenance and support services to ensure our members remain well equipped to do the important job we ask of them, including emergency evacuations and transportation of personnel and equipment, while also investing in Canada's growing marine industry." The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan Minister of National Defence "Canada's growing marine industry plays an important role in protecting Canadians and supporting Canadian workers. This investment, under the Government of Canada's National Shipbuilding Strategy, will help the hard-working members of the Canadian Armed Forces do their job, while also creating jobs in Delta." The Honourable Carla Qualtrough Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Disability Inclusion Quick facts Work under this contract is expected to run from January 1, 2021, to December 31, 2023, with options to extend the contract up to three years. Work will also include tests and trials, disposal, storage, shipping and transport, as well as field maintenance and engineering support. The scope of work will be on an as-required basis, depending on the condition of the boats throughout their serviceable life. This contract will support the CAF's current fleet of inflatable rubber boats and rigid (hull) inflatable boats, the CAF's future dive boats, the Canadian Army's 12-man assault boats, and the new multi-role boats being acquired by the Royal Canadian Navy. National Defence currently operates a fleet of approximately 1,000 inflatable rubber boats and 260 rigid (hull) inflatable boats. Since the launch of the National Shipbuilding Strategy, approximately $7.95 billion in contracts has been awarded under the repair, refit and maintenance pillar of the strategy. Associated links National Shipbuilding Strategy Royal Canadian Navy Follow us on Twitter Follow us on Facebook SOURCE Public Services and Procurement Canada For further information: Cecely Roy, Press Secretary, Office of the Honourable Anita Anand, 343-549-7293, cecely.roy@canada.ca; Media Relations, Public Services and Procurement Canada, 819-420-5501, media@pwgsc-tpsgc.gc.ca Related Links www.tpsgc-pwgsc.gc.ca https://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/government-of-canada-awards-contract-for-inspection-repair-and-overhaul-of-service-boats-841786125.html

  • Canada Expediting Purchase of Air Defense Systems, Anti-Tank Weapons

    February 10, 2023 | Local, Land

    Canada Expediting Purchase of Air Defense Systems, Anti-Tank Weapons

    The Canadian military is reportedly expediting the acquisition of air defense and anti-tank weapon systems for its troops in Latvia.

  • Canada to purchase 25 used Australian F-18 jets if U.S. gives approval

    June 18, 2018 | Local, Aerospace

    Canada to purchase 25 used Australian F-18 jets if U.S. gives approval

    David Pugliese, Ottawa Citizen The Liberals had originally announced they would buy 18 used Australian jets to augment Canada's CF-18s. The extra aircraft will likely be stripped down for parts Canada has boosted the number of used Australian fighter jets it is purchasing to 25, but the deal still hinges on approval from the U.S. government. The Liberal government originally announced it would buy 18 used Australian F-18 jets to augment the Royal Canadian Air Force's CF-18s until new aircraft can be purchased in the coming years. It has added seven more aircraft to the deal, Dan Blouin, a spokesman for the Department of National Defence, confirmed Friday. Those extra aircraft will likely be stripped down for parts. It is not known yet if the seven aircraft will be flown to Canada or shipped, Blouin added. The exact cost of the aircraft, along with weapons and other equipment, is not yet known as negotiations are still underway, Procurement Minister Carla Qualtrough recently told journalists. The Liberal government has set aside up to $500 million for the project and that would cover the seven added jets. An Australian Senate hearing was recently told that Canada was presented with a cost proposal last year. “They accepted our offer in December, but they have also put in a further request for some seven aircraft for system testing, training and spares,” Australian Air Vice Marshal Cath Roberts told the hearing. The U.S. government is examining the deal and will have to give its approval before Australia can sell the F-18s to Canada, because the F-18s were built in the U.S. with American technology. Canada is hoping for the U.S. approval sometime in the summer. Although U.S.-Canada relations have hit a slump, with President Donald Trump vowing to punish Canadians over economic disputes, the DND does not expect that to affect approval of the fighter jet deal. Pat Finn, DND's assistant deputy minister of materiel, has said he expects a deal by the end of the year with deliveries of the Australian planes to begin in the summer of 2019. The government originally planned for the arrival of the first used aircraft next January. The government had originally planned to buy 18 new Super Hornet fighter jets from U.S. aerospace giant Boeing. But, last year, Boeing complained to the U.S. Commerce Department that Canadian subsidies for Quebec-based Bombardier allowed it to sell its C-series civilian passenger aircraft in the U.S. at cut-rate prices. As a result, the Trump administration brought in a tariff of almost 300 per cent against the Bombardier aircraft sold in the U.S. In retaliation, Canada cancelled the deal to buy the 18 Super Hornets. That project would have cost more than US$5 billion. In the meantime, the federal government expects to issue next year a request for proposals from aerospace firms who want to take part in the competition to provide Canada with 88 new fighter jets. That project, with a $19 billion price-tag, would see the purchase of a new fleet of planes that would replace both the CF-18s and the used Australian jets.A winning bidder is expected to be selected in spring 2021 and the first of the new aircraft would be delivered four years later. The last CF-18 will be retired in 2032. http://nationalpost.com/news/politics/canada-to-purchase-25-used-australian-fighter-jets-if-states-says-yes

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