Back to news

February 12, 2018 | Local, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR

Les militaires du monde s’intéressent aux recherches sur le givre de l’UQAC

Vingt-deux conseillers militaires de dix-neuf pays sont dans la région ces jours-ci pour visiter le Laboratoire international des matériaux antigivre (LIMA) de l'UQAC, le seul laboratoire au monde qui se spécialise sur la question.

Car le givre est un ennemi contre lequel bombes, obus, balles et autres projectiles sont généralement inefficaces, alors que sa présence peut constituer une sérieuse menace.

« On a beaucoup de conseillers militaires étrangers qui sont des pilotes, ou qui sont rattachés d'une façon comme d'une autre à l'aviation », précise le capitaine Christian Courtemanche, officier de liaison diplomatique au sein des Forces canadiennes. « Le dégivrage d'avion, et le dégivrage d'ailleurs de vaisseaux maritimes et tout, c'est quelque chose qui intéresse tous les pays, surtout avec les changements climatiques des dernières décennies. »

Et contrairement à ce qu'on pourrait croire, le givre n'est pas un problème limité aux pays froids.

« Le problème de givrage en aviation ce n'est pas seulement pour les pays nordiques parce que ça se passe à haute altitude », ajoute le lieutenant-colonel Marc Ferron, directeur de liaison avec l'étranger. « Donc ça affecte pas mal toutes les forces armées représentées ici. »

L'intérêt que portent les militaires aux travaux du LIMA réjouit le directeur du laboratoire.

"Ils voient ce qu'on est en mesure de faire ou de proposer. Donc je pense que ça peut dans le futur, amener à certaines collaborations."

Christophe Volat, directeur du LIMA

C'est ce que croit aussi le lieutenant-colonel Ferron.

« Les attachés militaires sont très impressionnés par ce qu'ils ont vu », assure-t-il, soulignant que son rôle est justement de favoriser ce genre d'échanges.

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1083357/givre-uqac-armee

On the same subject

  • Canada's new fleet of supply ships get hit by another delay

    July 15, 2022 | Local, Naval

    Canada's new fleet of supply ships get hit by another delay

    Now, the first joint support ship won't be delivered until at least 2025, while the second is supposed to arrive in 2027.

  • A cyber war has started and Canada isn't ready to fight it, says report

    April 9, 2019 | Local, C4ISR, Security

    A cyber war has started and Canada isn't ready to fight it, says report

    Murray Brewster · CBC News Analysis says Canada lagging far behind its allies in responding to cyber warfare threat A new report questions how well prepared the Canadian military and the federal government are to fight a cyber war that, for all intents and purposes, has started already. The Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI), which represents major weapons and high-tech manufacturers, warns in a new report that, despite recent investments and policy papers, the country is lagging far behind its allies in preparing to fight a new kind of war. "The cyber threat to the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) permeates domestically through vulnerabilities in critical infrastructure, combat systems and equipment, and extends to where the military is deployed abroad," said the association's report, released Thursday. "Russia have proven their ability to launch attacks that cripple critical systems in seconds or quietly collect intelligence for years. The CAF has only recently received approval to engage in active and offensive operations at scale (though specialized activity has been present for years)." 'A genuine sense of urgency' To compile the report, researchers at CADSI conducted 70 interviews with government and military officials, as well as defence industry leaders. Christyn Cianfarani, the association's president, said the feedback was frank. "There's a genuine sense of urgency for Canada to advance in this space," she said. Even if the public doesn't feel the country is vulnerable, she added, "we could stand to be vulnerable by not moving forward very quickly." The report comes just weeks after a House of Commons committee heard that online attacks on Canada's financial system and other key infrastructure could become far more destructive as more militaries around the globe get involved in cyber operations. That testimony came from security expert and former CIA analyst Christopher Porter, an executive at the U.S. cyber security company Fireeye, Inc. He said the west's imposition of sanctions on "some countries" has in the past been met with denial-of-service attacks on financial services websites, but those attacks have only been disruptive. "In the future, they may respond with destructive attacks," he testified on Feb. 6. Cianfarani echoed that warning. "I think, if you look, other nations are attacking Canada," she said. "Other nations aren't just attacking Canada in a short-game play. They are attacking Canada and trying to influence things in our country in a long-game play." The defence association report also took aim at the federal government's ponderous procurement system, noting that adversaries and allies have "demonstrated their ability to deploy new cyber capabilities in months or weeks, while the CAF remains burdened by a years-long and sometimes decades-long procurement cycle." Time to 'blow up' the procurement system? Cianfarani said the procurement system has to "be blown up" and "torn apart" when it comes to acquiring cyber equipment and services. It should take six months, not 10 years, to get those kinds of products into the hands of cyber operators, she added. Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan's office declined comment and referred CBC News to the Communications Security Establishment, which defends the federal government's networks. While CSE spokesman Evan Koronewski did not address the specific criticisms in the industry association report, he pointed to the creation of the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security, which brings "operational security experts from across the Government of Canada under one roof" — something that is expected to deliver a more unified approach. "Although we cannot speak specifically to the Cyber Centre's capabilities, we are confident our men and women have the tools they need to deliver on their mission," Koronewski said in an email. The study found "government and industry lack the mutual trust required to effectively collaborate in the cyber defence of Canada" and proposed a series of remedies. "This distrust has been sown over time through a history of unproductive engagements, limited communications and inadequate mutual understanding of each other's capabilities," said the analysis. The Council of Canadian Innovators has delivered a similar message to the federal government on many occasions over the last two years, but Cianfarani said she believes that the upcoming federal election and the possibility of interference in it — foreign or otherwise — will focus the attention of both the public and decision-makers. "I think around an election is probably when we have the loudest voice, and it's when we're probably, as a country, the most vulnerable," she said. The report pointed to other countries, such as the United States, where cyber defence strategies are primarily driven by industry, supported by the academic community and funded by the government without bureaucratic limitations. "A similar approach for Canada could mobilize a strong, sovereign line of defence against rapidly evolving cyber threats," the report said. https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/a-cyber-war-has-started-and-canada-isn-t-ready-to-fight-it-says-report-1.5045950

  • SkyAlyne: A True Canadian Collaboration for FAcT

    October 31, 2019 | Local, Aerospace

    SkyAlyne: A True Canadian Collaboration for FAcT

    In May 2018, CAE and KF Aerospace joined together to form SkyAlyne Canada – a 50/50 joint venture to focus on developing and delivering military pilot and aircraft training in Canada. These two companies currently deliver all phases of pilot training to the Royal Canadian Air Force through the NATO Flying Training in Canada (NFTC) program and the Contracted Flying Training and Support (CFTS) program. These programs will come to an end in the next few years and Canada is looking to award a new contract to renew its existing aircrew training services through the Future Aircrew Training program (FAcT). Vanguard recently had the opportunity to speak with Peter Fedak, Program Solutions, SkyAlyne Canada. Can you tell us a little more about this joint venture between CAE and KF Aerospace? Peter Fedak: CAE and KF Aerospace are the current providers of all phases of military pilot training and air combat system operator training in Canada. Since we have the knowledge, experience, and credibility with the RCAF in providing these training services to them, we thought that by joining together we can provide the best solution for Canada. The best way to do that was to create an entirely new entity – a 50/50 joint venture – with two leading air training Canadian companies. That led to the birth of SkyAlyne, a true collaboration to bring the best solution for the future, provided by a truly Canadian organization. The expertise that we possess – right here in Canada – is a real benefit to Canadians and the RCAF. What are some of the top training challenges with the current programs? PF: With any government program, the most important thing to taxpayers is cost. In Canada, we have some unique environmental challenges that drive the cost up, like the weather, flying below 40 degrees Celsius or above 40. This requires infrastructure, aircraft requirements, and personnel to operate in these extreme temperatures. Another challenge is timing. The NFTC program will expire in 2023, with an option year to 2024. The timeline to engineer the transition, planning, and infrastructure is a challenge that we and the government recognize, but we are ready to face it. With our ongoing programs, we are well situated to seamlessly make the transition for Canada. If SkyAlyne is selected for the FAcT program, what are some of the capabilities that this joint venture will bring to the table? PF: A key part in the lead up to FAcT will be to maintain the existing training programs while transitioning to the new program. We have the employees, technical and infrastructure base with the current programs and the ability to seamlessly move between the two. The most valuable resource is people and under NFTC and CFTS, we have a true core human resources capability of trained, qualified and professional people that work under these programs every day and are committed to the success of the pilot training program for the RCAF. Having these personnel is a real core capability for us to maintain the production of pilots while moving forward. Can you share with us some of the lessons or takeaways from the CFTS program that you think would be important to incorporate into the FAcT program? PF: The key lesson is the relationship. We didn't create this program and then offer it to the RCAF. We are here because of the RCAF and the Government of Canada. We are here to support them by understanding the culture and people and building on that by working closely with them to keep the program moving forward. This is truly a long-term relationship, like a marriage. We are here for 22 years under this contract and looking for another 25 years. So, it's a matter of establishing and maintaining that trust going forward. That's the only way you can get through these long-term complex contracts – building a good relationship. Thanks for taking the time to speak with us. PF: Thank you very much for the opportunity. It's always a pleasure to speak about not only our current programs here in Southport, Manitoba and Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan but also the future opportunities to continue supporting the Government of Canada with our exciting new joint venture of SkyAlyne. To hear more about this topic listen to the podcast with Peter Fedak. https://vanguardcanada.com/2019/10/30/skyalyne-a-true-canadian-collaboration-for-fact/

All news