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August 2, 2019 | International, Aerospace, Naval, Land, C4ISR, Security

Contract Awards by US Department of Defense - Aug 1, 2019

DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Tesoro Refining and Marketing Co., San Antonio, Texas (SPE602-19-D-0506, $348,692,953); BP Products North America Inc., Chicago, Illinois (SPE602-19-D-0514, $315,599,804); Par Hawaii Refining LLC, Houston, Texas (SPE602-19-D-0510, $271,274,321); Valero Marketing and Supply Co., San Antonio, Texas (SPE602-19-D-0504, $260,554,844); Equillon Enterprises LLC, doing business as Shell Oil Products, Houston, Texas (SPE602-19-D-0509, $228,126,037); BP West Coast Products LLC, Blaine, Washington (SPE602-19-D-0512, $157,502,370); U.S. Oil and Refining Co., Tacoma, Washington (SPE602-19-D-0513, $156,746,055); Petro Star Inc.,* Anchorage, Alaska (SPE600-19-D-0505, $110,836,555); Phillips 66 Co., Houston, Texas (SPE602-19-D-0515, $58,246,377); Epic Aviation LLC, Salem, Oregon (SPE602-19-D-0508, $38,905,276); and Sinclair Oil Corp.,* doing business as Sinclair, Salt Lake City, Utah, (SPE602-19-D-0507, $38,197,366), have each been awarded a fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract under solicitation SPE602-19-R-0703 for various types of fuel. These were competitive acquisitions with 21 offers received. They are one-year contracts with a 30-day carryover. Locations of performance are Texas, Illinois, Washington, Alaska, Oregon, Utah, and the Rocky Mountain Region of the continental U.S., with an Oct. 30, 2020, performance completion date. Using customer is Defense Logistics Agency Energy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Energy, Fort Belvoir, Virginia.

Petro Star Inc.,* Anchorage, Alaska, has been awarded a maximum $52,630,968 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for JA1 jet fuel. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a one-year contract with a 30-day carryover. Location of performance is Alaska, with an Oct. 30, 2020, performance completion date. Using customer is Air Force. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Energy, Fort Belvoir, Virginia (SPE602-19-D-0517).

Sysco Raleigh LLC, Selma, North Carolina, has been awarded a maximum $49,019,871 fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment, indefinite-quantity contract for full line food distribution. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a 286-day contract with no option periods. Location of performance is North Carolina, with a May 16, 2020, performance completion date. Using customers are Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and federal civilian agencies. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 defense working capital funds. The contracting agency is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE300-19-D-3230).

Oshkosh Defense LLC, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, has been awarded a maximum $27,537,300 firm-fixed-price requirements contract for pneumatic tire wheel assemblies. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a three-year contract with no option periods. Locations of performance are Wisconsin and New Jersey, with a July 29, 2022, performance completion date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2019 through 2022 Army working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Land and Maritime, Warren, Michigan (SPRDL1-19-D-0130). (Awarded July 30, 2019)

U.S. TRANSPORTATION COMMAND

Crowley Logistics Inc., Jacksonville, Florida, has been awarded a contract modification, P00009, on contract HTC711-17-D-R003 in the estimated amount of $328,000,000. This modification provides continued surface transportation coordination services for the movement of freight within the continental U.S. and Canada under the Department of Defense Freight Transportation Services program to the Defense Logistics Agency and Defense Contract Management Agency. Work will be performed in the continental U.S. and in Canada. The period of performance is from Aug. 1, 2019, to July 31, 2020. Fiscal 2019 transportation working capital funds were obligated at award. This modification brings the total cumulative face value of the contract from $110,285,829 to $438,285,829. U.S. Transportation Command, Directorate of Acquisition, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, is the contracting activity.

AIR FORCE

Raytheon Co., Woburn, Massachusetts, has been awarded a $36,250,251, firm-fixed-price contract modification (P00014) to previously awarded contract FA8730-17-C-0010 for the Qatar Early Warning Radar (QEWR). This modification is for procurement and storage of obsolescent spares in support of QEWR sustainment. The modification brings the total cumulative face value of the contract to $1,094,776,076. Work will be performed in Woburn, Massachusetts, and is expected to be completed by August 2023. This modification involves 100% foreign military sales to the country of Qatar. Foreign Military Sales funds in the amount of $36,250,251 are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, is the contracting activity.

Summers Concrete Contracting Inc., Hahira, Georgia, has been awarded a ceiling $25,000,000 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for repair airfield pavements. This contract provides for repair or alteration of airport runways and taxiways construction requirements. Work will be performed at Moody Air Force Base, Valdosta, Georgia; and Sebring, Florida, and is expected to be completed by July 31, 2024. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition with three offers received. No funds are being obligated at the time of award. The 23d Contracting Squadron, Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, is the contracting activity (FA4830-19-D-A001).

Verdis-Takisaki JV, Coeur d'Alene, Idaho (FA4620-19-D-A007); National Native American Construction Inc., Coeur d'Alene, Idaho (FA4620-19-D-A010); Global-Northcon JV, Hayden, Idaho (FA4620-19-D-A011); and Imperial Construction NW LLC, Wapato, Washington (FA4620-19-D-A012), have been awarded a combined, not-to-exceed $23,000,000 indefinite-quantity multiple award task order contract for design-build construction efforts. Work will be performed at Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, and is to be expected to be complete by July 31, 2024. These awards are the result of a competitive acquisition and eight offers were received. Fiscal 2019 operation and maintenance funds in the amount of $500 are being obligated to each company at the time of award. The 92d Contracting Squadron, Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, is the contracting activity.

L3 Technologies Inc., Link Training & Simulation Division, Arlington, Texas, has been awarded a $10,411,380 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract task order modification (P00011) to the previously awarded FA8621-19-6251 task order for F-16 aircraft simulator training program services. This contract modification will provide aircraft concurrency requirements for the M7.3 Operation Flight Plan to deliver medium and high-fidelity simulation capability to train pilots for the F-16 aircraft platform. The modification brings the total cumulative face value of the contract to $28,440,800. Work will be performed at Arlington, Texas, and is expected to be completed by March 31, 2021. Fiscal 2019 research and development funds in the amount of $800,000 are being obligated at the time of award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, is the contract activity.

University of Dayton Research Institute, College Park, Dayton, Ohio, has been awarded a $9,800,000 cost-plus-fixed-fee, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract. This contract provides enhancement and improvement to the non-destructive evaluation capabilities for aerospace structures and components. This contract promotes discovery and provides increased accuracy, precision, reliability and optimization of the material state awareness of aerospace materials. Work will be performed at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, and is expected to be completed by Aug. 3, 2026. This award is the result of a competitive acquisition and three offers were received. Fiscal 2019 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $304,000 will be obligated at the time of award via task order 0001. The Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, is the contracting activity (FA8650-19-D-5230).

ARMY

Kinder Brothers Excavating Inc.,* Dexter, Missouri (W912EQ-19-D-0009); SYTE Corp.,* Chicago, Illinois (W912EQ-19-D-0007); Randy Kinder Excavating Inc.,* Dexter, Missouri (W912EQ-19-D-0008); and C&M Contractors Inc.,* Doniphan, Missouri (W912EQ-19-D-0006), will compete for each order of the $50,000,000 firm-fixed-price contract for all plant, labor, materials and equipment for construction of relief wells, repairs to existing relief wells and construction of earthen berms. Bids were solicited via the internet with four received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 20, 2024. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Memphis, Tennessee, is the contracting activity.

Sehlke Consulting LLC,* Arlington, Virginia, was awarded a $9,999,500 order-dependent contract for financial management support services. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work locations and funding will be determined with each order, with an estimated completion date of Aug. 9, 2024. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, is the contracting activity (W91CRB-19-A-0001).

P&S Construction Inc.,* North Chelmsford, Massachusetts, was awarded a $9,457,700 firm-fixed-price contract for construction of a small arms range at Westover Air Reserve Base, Massachusetts. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Westover, Massachusetts, with an estimated completion date of Dec. 9, 2020. Fiscal 2016, 2017 and 2018 military construction funds in the amount of $9,457,700 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville, Kentucky, is the contracting activity (W912QR-19-C-0020).

Nisou LGC JV LLC,* Detroit, Michigan, was awarded an $8,945,520 firm-fixed-price contract for construction of the aerial port facility at Grissom Air Reserve Base, Indiana. Bids were solicited via the internet with two received. Work will be performed in Grissom, Indiana, with an estimated completion date of Oct. 12, 2020. Fiscal 2015, 2017 and 2019 military construction funds in the amount of $8,945,520 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville, Kentucky, is the contracting activity (W912QR-19-C-0026).

Navistar Defense LLC, Lisle, Illinois, was awarded a $7,766,045 firm-fixed-price contract for 4x4 cargo trucks, 6x6 general transport truck, 6x6 30 ton recovery wrecker and medium tactical vehicles general transport truck spares. Bids were solicited via the internet with one received. Work will be performed in Lisle, Illinois, with an estimated completion date of Sept. 27, 2020. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance, Army funds in the amount of $7,766,045 were obligated at the time of the award. U.S. Army Contracting Command, Warren, Michigan, is the contracting activity (W56HZV-19-F-0455).

NAVY

Lockheed Martin, Mission Systems and Training, Baltimore, Maryland, is awarded $18,849,765 for cost-plus award-fee order N62786-19-F-0055 against the previously awarded basic ordering agreement N00024-15-G-2303 to provide engineering and management services for LCS-15 post shakedown availability. Lockheed Martin will provide support of the following: 62,462 man-hours level of effort; and to provide the work specification, pre-fabrication and material. Work will be performed in Moorestown, New Jersey (37%); Mayport, Florida (35%); Hampton, Virginia (14%); and Washington, District of Colombia (14%), and is expected to be complete by January 2021. Fiscal 2013 and 2019 shipbuilding and conversion (Navy); and fiscal 2019 other procurement (Navy) funding in the amount of $13,631,677 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair, Bath, Maine, is the contracting activity.

BAE Systems Land & Armaments LP, Minneapolis, Minnesota, is awarded an $8,411,293 cost-plus-fixed-fee delivery order for MK38 Gun Weapon System Repair Program support. This contract action is for labor, material and services required to support the Gun Weapon System Repair Program in pre/post testing, removal/installation, refurbishment, fleet technical assistance, maintenance, training and fleet modernization of MK 38 machine gun system. Work will be performed in Norfolk, Virginia (29%); San Diego, California (27%); Yokosuka, Japan (16%); Manama, Bahrain (7%); Rota Spain (7%); Everett, Washington (4%); Tacoma, Washington (4%); Pearl Harbor, Hawaii (4%); and Pascagoula, Mississippi (2%), and is expected to be complete by September 2021. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy); and fiscal 2019 weapons procurement (Navy and Coast Guard) in the amount of $1,050,000 will be obligated at the time of award, and $750,000 will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This delivery order was solicited as a sole source under basic ordering agreement N00174-18-G-0001 in accordance with 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1). The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division, Indian Head, Maryland, is the contracting activity (N00174-19-F-0420).

Leidos Innovations Corp, Gaithersburg, Maryland, is awarded an $8,208,133 performance-based, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity, firm-fixed-price contract for Micro-processor En-route Automated Radar Tracking System (MEARTS). The contract is for the acquisition of hardware, software, logistics and on-call help desk support for MEARTS. The contract includes a single five-year ordering period and one six-month option to extend services in accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Clause 52.217-8. The option period, if exercised, would bring the cumulative value of this contract to an estimated $8,737,303. Work will be performed in Charleston, South Carolina, and is expected to be completed by January 2025. An order utilizing fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance (Navy) funds in the amount of $605,690 will be obligated at time of award. Contract funds will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This requirement was not competitively procured because it is a sole-source acquisition pursuant to the authority of 10 U.S. Code 2304(c)(1) only one Responsible Source FAR Subpart 6.302-1). Naval Information Warfare Center Atlantic, Charleston, South Carolina, is the contracting activity (N65236-19-D-1001).

EFW Inc., Fort Worth, Texas, is awarded $7,228,544 for firm-fixed-price delivery order N68335-19-F-0006 against a previously issued basic ordering agreement (N00019-17-G-0014). This delivery order procures 15 Fast Characterization Tools, 15 Helmet Kit Modification Fixtures, 15 Ready Room Testers and 20 Night Vision Goggle Modification Kits for the V-22 Color Helmet Mounted Display System. In addition, this delivery order provides drawing packages and the upgrade of five Fast Characterization Tools. Work will be performed in Haifa, Israel (70%); and Fort Worth, Texas (30%), and is expected to be completed in October 2020. Fiscal 2017 aircraft procurement (Air Force); and fiscal 2019 procurement defense-wide funds in the amount of $7,228,544 will be obligated at time of award, $3,496,053 of which will expire at the end of the current fiscal year. The Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, New Jersey, is the contracting activity.

DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY

CoSolutions EIS JV LLC,* Sterling, Virginia, was awarded a labor hour contract (HMM402-19-F-0098) with an estimated total value of $10,000,148 to support intelligence training in Europe. Work will be performed at the Regional Joint Intelligence Training Facility at RAF Molesworth, United Kingdom; Patch Barracks, Stuttgart, Germany; and, on a temporary duty basis, at other locations in Europe and within the continental U.S. The expected completion date is July 31, 2024, if all options are exercised. Fiscal 2019 operations and maintenance funds in the amount of $1,713,015 are being obligated at time of award. This contract was solicited through a small business set aside and one offer was received. The Virginia Contracting Activity, Washington, District of Columbia, is the contracting activity.

*Small Business

https://dod.defense.gov/News/Contracts/Contract-View/Article/1923647/source/GovDelivery/

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  • U.S. Army Awards BAE Systems $318 Million for Next Generation M88A3 Recovery Vehicle

    September 18, 2019 | International, Land

    U.S. Army Awards BAE Systems $318 Million for Next Generation M88A3 Recovery Vehicle

    STERLING HEIGHTS, Mich.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The U.S. Army has awarded BAE Systems a $318 million contract to upgrade M88 recovery vehicles to the M88A3 configuration designed for single-vehicle recovery of the latest version of the Abrams tank. The new M88A3 configuration eliminates the necessity of using two vehicles to raise and move the tanks, which have increased in weight in recent years. “As the U.S. Army's primary recovery vehicle, the M88 plays a critical role in the Army's Armored Brigade Combat Team,” said Dennis Hancock, recovery programs director for BAE Systems' Combat Vehicles business. “We have partnered closely with the Army and industry partners to develop a solution that addresses the single-vehicle recovery gap. We are proud to continue to support the Army's recovery needs by providing a next-generation solution to effectively rescue disabled tanks from the battlefield.” The M88A3 configuration features an upgraded powertrain, suspension and tracks, increasing the vehicle's speed, survivability and reliability. The M88A3 also features a seventh road wheel to reduce ground pressure and new hydropneumatic suspension units (HSUs) that enable the track to be locked out for greater control when recovering vehicles. The contract is being awarded under an Other Transactional Authority (OTA) acquisition model for upgrading the M88A2 Heavy Equipment Recovery Combat Utility Lift Evacuation System (HERCULES) to the next generation M88A3 HERCULES. BAE Systems' M88 family of recovery vehicles has provided the Army with unprecedented capability for recovering stranded or disabled combat vehicles since the 1960s. Due to incremental weight increases of the Army's Main Battle Tank over the years, the M88A3's predecessor, the M88A2, is currently unable to safely perform single-vehicle recovery of the Abrams. BAE Systems has invested Independent Research and Development to develop the M88A3 for three years in an effort to identify, understand, and provide solutions to return to single-vehicle recovery of the tank. The work will be performed at BAE Systems' facilities in York, Pennsylvania; Aiken, South Carolina, Anniston, Alabama, and Sterling Heights, Michigan. https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20190917006045/en/

  • GAO backs use of commercial satellites to host military payloads

    July 31, 2018 | International, Aerospace

    GAO backs use of commercial satellites to host military payloads

    by Sandra Erwin “Using hosted payloads may help facilitate a proliferation of payloads on orbit, making it more difficult for an adversary to defeat a capability." WASHINGTON — The Pentagon should use commercial satellites as host platforms for military sensors and communications packages, says a new Government Accountability Office report released on Monday. GAO auditors investigated the pros and cons of “hosted payloads” and agreed with what private satellite operators have been saying for years: The military can save money and get capabilities on-orbit faster by hitching rides on commercial satellites. The industry has been building huge spacecraft that have extra carrying capacity, and hosting national security payloads is viewed as a profitable business that also helps the military fill a need. The report says there are national security benefits to deploying military payloads on commercial satellites. “Using hosted payloads may also help facilitate a proliferation of payloads on orbit, making it more difficult for an adversary to defeat a capability.” Since 2009, DoD has used three commercially hosted payloads, with three more missions planned or underway through 2022. In 2011, the Air Force created a Hosted Payload Office to provide expertise and other tools to facilitate matching government payloads with commercial hosts. GAO found that defense programs using hosted payloads are not required and generally do not provide cost and technical data, or lessons learned, to the Hosted Payload Office. Having that information would “better position DoD to make informed decisions when considering acquisition approaches for upcoming space system designs.” The Pentagon has not been too keen on hosted payloads for several reasons, GAO noted. There is a perception among some defense officials that matching government payloads to commercial satellites is too difficult. Another concern is that DoD's knowledge on using hosted payloads is “fragmented, in part because programs are not required to share information.” DoD officials who spoke with GAO identified “logistical challenges to matching government payloads with any given commercial host satellite.” For example, they cited size, weight and power constraints as barriers to using hosted payloads. Some individual DoD offices have realized cost and schedule benefits, but “DoD as a whole has limited information on costs and benefits of hosted payloads,” said the report. Officials at the Office of the Secretary of Defense told GAO that “matching requirements between government payloads and commercial satellites is typically too difficult for programs to overcome.” DoD's Hosted Payload Office is “developing tools designed to help address these challenges,” said the report. Defense officials also argued that budget and planning processes are a hurdle. “This can complicate alignment with commercial timelines because the development of a government sensor would need to be underway well in advance of a decision to fund a commercially hosted payload approach.” Officials told GAO that it is possible to align government and commercial timelines. For example, the Missile Defense Agency adopted the commercial host's schedule to ensure its Space Based Kill Assessment payload was ready for integration and launch without delaying the host satellite or missing its ride to space. Similarly, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has been able to align acquisition and development schedules with the commercial host. In its written comments in the report, DoD concurred with GAO's recommendations and noted that the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center had initiated a major reorganization and that under the new organization, the Hosted Payload Office had changed and may not be the appropriate office for centralizing DoD-wide hosted payload knowledge. Language in the Fiscal Year 2019 National Defense Authorization Act directs the Pentagon to seize oversight of military investments in hosted payloads. https://spacenews.com/gao-backs-use-of-commercial-satellites-to-host-military-payloads/

  • Fewer airmen, fewer bombs and delayed F-15s: Goldfein outlines effects of continuing resolution

    November 8, 2019 | International, Aerospace

    Fewer airmen, fewer bombs and delayed F-15s: Goldfein outlines effects of continuing resolution

    By: Stephen Losey With Congress flailing in its attempt to pass a budget and the prospect of a lengthy continuing resolution growing, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Dave Goldfein on Wednesday outlined how bad that would be. A year-long CR, funding the Air Force at fiscal 2019 levels, would cost the service the $11.8 billion increase called for in President Trump's proposed fiscal 2020 budget, Goldfein said at a breakfast hosted by the Air Force Association in Washington. “It's truly damaging for all the services, and certainly the United States Air Force,” Goldfein said. Even if a CR only lasts for six months, the effects would be significant, he said. The Air Force would lose $1.1 billion that would go to Boeing's development and production of new F-15EX fighters, postponing their acquisition and driving up prices, according to a fact sheet Goldfein distributed. It would also force the Air Force to keep flying F-15Cs for longer than it expected, resulting in further cost increases due to the extensive maintenance needed to keep the aging fighters, plagued by structural health issues, in the air. A six-month CR would also hit the Air Force's effort to re-arm. It would reduce munitions procurement by 1,000 tailkits to convert unguided bombs into guided Joint Direct Attack Munitions, as well as cut 99 Sidewinder air-to-air missiles and 665 Small Diameter Bomb II munitions. And that CR would cost the Air Force $188 million intended for improvements to almost one-third of its F-35 fleet. But a year-long CR would be even worse, Goldfein said, hitting airmen directly and limiting the planned 3.1 percent pay raise for troops. It would also scuttle the Air Force's plans to grow its total force end strength by 4,400, he said, which would hurt its efforts to grow vital — and undermanned — career fields such as operations, maintenance, space, cyber, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. Efforts to fix the pilot shortfall would take a hit, cutting $123 million from undergraduate flight training, Goldfein said. This would mean contractor instructor pilots would be reduced, a new maintenance training center's opening would be delayed, and trainer fleet maintenance would be delayed. A CR for all of fiscal 2020 would also delay the procurement of the GPS IIIF space vehicle to replace a satellite that has now been orbiting for twice as long as it was designed, which would place the Air Force in a contract breach. It would withhold $466 million in facility sustainment, restoration and modernization funds, as well as Defense Department emergency funding, slowing the efforts to recover from natural disasters at Tyndall and Offutt Air Force bases. In all, a six-month CR would delay the start of 26 new programs, 7 production increases, and eight military construction projects. A year-long resolution would prevent 88 new starts, 14 production increases and 41 military construction projects. F-22 sensor upgrades would also be delayed if a budget is not passed, the Air Force said. But as rocky as the 2020 budget process may be, Goldfein sees even darker days to come. “If you look at the projections of funding in the years ahead, many believe that [2021] may very well be the last really good year of funding," Goldfein said. “It may not be true. But it may go flat after that, or it may start coming down. And so, how do you achieve irreversible momentum if you have one good year left of reasonable resources before a potential downturn?” https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/your-air-force/2019/11/06/fewer-airmen-fewer-bombs-and-delayed-f-15s-goldfein-outlines-effects-of-continuing-resolution/

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